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Features

  • The Julie’s Helpers Memorial Scholarship Committee recently announced the recipients of the fourth annual scholarships, given to Navajo women who desire to serve their community and need help funding a challenging academic course of study.
    The recipient of this year’s $2,500 Julie’s Helpers Memorial Scholarship is Markie Bee, who is a senior at New Mexico Tech in Socorro.
    Bee is a single mom of a 3-year-old son, Orion Vicenti. “Being a single mom…it is a big relief getting any financial help,” she said.
    Bee is from Fruitland, a community between Shiprock and Farmington. She is working on receiving her bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering with plans to graduate in May. She hopes to serve the Navajo tribe by working with oil and gas industries to ensure more efficient processes and minimalize environmental damage to Indian Country. Her future plans are to achieve a master’s degree and return to Farmington to pursue a career in the petroleum industry.
    According to a press release, Bee has a passion for chemistry and has volunteered through the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) to encourage other Native American youth to pursue college degrees. She will be the first in her family to graduate from college.

  • The public can see and drive a variety of different robots at “Robotics Night” from 5 to 8 p.m., Friday at the Bradbury Science Museum. Robots from Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Hazardous Devices Team, the FIRST Robotics Clubs (high school and middle-school students), University of New Mexico-Los Alamos, First LEGO League and other local robotics enthusiasts are scheduled to be at the museum.
    Activities take place inside the downtown museum and in the surface parking outside adjacent to Central Avenue.
    Attendees can watch demonstrations on how the robots work and ask questions of robot operators. Also featured will be Sumo Bot battles. The Sumo robots are autonomous, battery-powered and controlled by an Arduino or a similar processor. Competitors will battle to push each other out of the ring with only their sensors and programming to guide them.
    For more information, visit lanl.gov/museum/events/happening-now.shtml.
     

  • Los Alamos
    East Park Pool Snack Bar, 111 East Road
    Date inspected: June 23
    Violations: One high-risk violation. Sanitizer at too high of concentration, which was corrected at time of inspection. Two moderate-risk violations. Thermometer needed inside refrigerator. Test strips needed for sanitizer.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    S-Site Café, TA-16, SM-192
    Date inspected: June 23
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Film Festival at Home, 3801 Arkansas Ave.
    Date inspected: June 23
    Violations: One low-risk violation. Restroom self closing device on door needs to work properly.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

  • Auto enthusiasts will
    emerge for Autumn Run

  • The Drury Plaza Hotel in Santa Fe is now officially open for business.
    “We have had a successful week welcoming our first group of guests,” said Tauseen Malik, general manager of the Drury Plaza Hotel in Santa Fe. “The feedback has been very positive, especially about our spacious, light-filled rooms and our great, friendly staff.  We pride ourselves on hospitality and for the ninth consecutive year, Drury Hotels has ranked in the top slot for Highest in Guest Satisfaction Among Mid-Scale Hotel Chains by J.D. Power. We are proud to be bringing that top service to Santa Fe.”
     The Drury Plaza Hotel in Santa Fe will be hosting numerous events this year. The hotel recently hosted the Women’s International Study Center’s symposium, with more than 300 panelists, including Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The hotel will also host to Santa Fe’s inaugural cyclocross event on Sept. 20.

  • Severe weather struck many times earlier this month as monsoon season started. A representative from the National Weather Service recently held a class at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center to conduct a SKYWARN™ Weather Spotter class.
    Meteorologists from the NWS taught the basics of severe local storms, to include thunderstorms, flash floods, downburst winds, tornadoes and more. They also spoke of NWS operations, important safety information and how to stay prepared.
    During the class, participants had the chance to talk to NWS representatives about becoming an official SKYWARN™ Weather Spotter.
    Weather spotters are the “eyes and ears” of the NWS and provide valuable weather reports. Those interested often include citizens, amateur radio operators, CERT and Citizen
Corps personnel, law enforcement, fire, transportation and public works staff. Spotter reports, coupled with radar, satellite and other data, has enabled the NWS to issue more timely and accurate warnings and statements for types of hazardous weather.

  • As the Holocaust and Intolerance Museum of New Mexico comes of age, it’s honoring children who never got the chance.
    Marking 13 years of advocating tolerance, the museum celebrates its Bar Mitzvah year remembering the 1.5 million children murdered under the Nazi regime, many of whom didn’t live to see their own coming of age.
    The museum board invites the public to join special event and reception, 2 p.m. Sunday, in Congregation B’nai Israel, 4401 Indian School, NE, in Albuquerque.
    “We dedicate our Bar Mitzvah year remembering the innocents who met a cruel and senseless death brought on by hate and intolerance,” said Jerry Small, a museum representative. “We must never forget in order to end these atrocities that continue even today in countries ravaged by war.”
    During World War II, Adolf Hitler’s army and collaborators killed more than a million Jewish children, tens of thousands of Romani (Gypsy) children, German youth with physical and mental disabilities, Polish children, and innocents residing in the occupied Soviet Union, according to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. The chances for survival for Jewish and some non-Jewish adolescents (13-18 years old) were greater, only because they could be deployed at forced labor.

  • Tickets are now on sale for the High Tea and Fashion Show. The show starts at 3 p.m. Aug. 30 at at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church, 2900 Trinity Drive in Kelly Hall. Fashions will be available for sale from Shop on the Corner, the Trinity on the Hill thrift shop. There will also be a silent auction with handmade items, gift certificates, time and talent donations and more. Tickets are $25, children 10 and under $10. Advance ticket purchases are recommended. To buy tickets call 662-5107.  
    All proceeds go to support two house building mission trips to Ciudad Juárez, Mexico this fall, one in October (House of Hope Women), one in November (Trinity Builders, co-ed team).
    The House of Hope and Trinity Builders house-building mission teams are sponsors for the fifth annual fundraising event.
    Just as last year, decorated tables, adorned with place settings and fresh flowers, will be the setting for the tea and homemade food items will be provided by team members and volunteers.
    Cups of tea will be served from “bottomless” teapots that will include black teas as well as a variety of herbal and flavored teas. Afternoon hats are encouraged and will certainly generate some lively conversation as friends chat and make new acquaintances at round tables of eight settings each.

  • Los Alamos County Library System has acquired the online resource National Geographic Virtual Library, which brings the world to any computer.
    The National Geographic magazine offers photographs and articles, ethnographic and cultural information, superb maps and serious scholarship. The complete archive of National Geographic magazine since 1888 is available now.
    This collection includes the National Geographic magazine and the National Geographic Traveler, as well as hundreds of books, maps, videos and images. A library card will give you unlimited access to:
    • National Geographic magazine Archive, 1888-1994
    • National Geographic magazine Archive, 1995-Current
    • National Geographic: People, Animals and the World
    • National Geographic Kids
    The online National Geographic is searchable by general topic, such as “The Environment,” “People and Cultures,” or “Animals,” as well as by story or magazine editions.

  • Los Alamos Middle School recently won a grant to hold a district wide poster contest to promote Keep New Mexico Beautiful (KNMB) that helped promote the local summer reading program. The posters were on display at Mesa Public Library while winners were selected from the entries. Chamisa art teacher, Renee Mitsunaga’s class had several submissions.

  • Dem meeting

    As a follow-up to Valerie Plame’s visit last week supporting Stephanie Garcia Richard, the movie Fair Game about her outing as a CIA operative by the Bush administration will be shown at 7 p.m. today at the Democrat Headquarters (next to Quiznos). An info session discussing volunteer opportunities will be at 6:15. All Democrats are welcome to come.

    Blood drive

    A blood drive will be held Aug. 21 and Aug. 22 at the First Baptist Church on Diamond Drive. Hours will be 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Aug. 21 and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 22. To sign up, call United Blood Services at 877-UBS-HERO or 505 246-1457.

    GOP meeting

    The Republican Party of Los Alamos will hold its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday at the UNM-LA Wallace Hall, Room 505. The program will be a forum on the proposed charter change to restructure county utilities. Advocates both for and against will present their cases and respond to questions. A regular business meeting will follow. The public is welcome. For more information, call Robert Gibson, 662-3159.

    Concert

     Tuesdays at the Pond Series. 7 p.m. today at Ashley Pond. Bronach Celtic Blues Band and the Belisama Dance group will perform.  

  • Live to work or work to live? That’s a question that some of us will be left pondering after the August presentation at the Los Alamos Mountaineers.
    The monthly meeting begins at 7 p.m. Wednesday at Fuller Lodge. The meeting starts with refreshments, reports on recent and upcoming LAM-sponsored trips, as well as a “safety minute” courtesy of one of the members.
    The feature presentation will be a talk by Lauren Heerschap will describe a recent trip, “The Right Place at the Wrong Time: Hot Limestone Climbing of Croatia and Slovenia.”
    Heerschap is an avid climber who bases many of her life decisions — where to live, where to vacation — around rock-climbing opportunities.
    A geology instructor at Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colorado, she uses her summers off to good advantage.
    In 2013, she and her husband, also a science teacher, spent about five weeks in Croatia and Slovenia climbing some of the best rock they have ever encountered. They climbed everything “from slabs to steep tufas to multi-pitch walls over 100 feet tall,” Heerschap said. “Only it was 90 degrees and 90-percent humidity every day!”

  • Well, it is that open house time of the year for our many schools and I hope this year you will stop by the Asset booths, or perhaps introduce yourself to our great many Asset Champions at each school.
    These folks are volunteers, paid in randomly delivered baked goods, who just know how important that assets framework is, in the lives of our youth.
    The 2014 Teacher of the Year, Sean McComb reminds us that involved parents are key in helping students succeed.
    One of the most enlightening items from Beth Mattey, a 27-year career school nurse is, “sadness is one of the most common illnesses seen in schools today. There is so much we sweep aside that needs to not just come to the center of attention, but actually be talked about with our kids.
    The Parade and American Profile supplements respectfully remind us of two of the most important things in helping our youth.
    It doesn’t cost a thing for each of us to intentionally build assets and the number of things done daily, without herald would astound you.
    Our bevy of builders this year includes some familiar faces and some new additions to the pool.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:
    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html
    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. weekends.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care.
    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    CATS
    George, Abby and Maddie — These are older, declawed cats who were surrendered when their owner’s health prevented her from keeping them. The shelter is currently working on getting to know them and would be happy to send them out together if possible — $35 for two, or $70 for all three!

  •  

    Bronach Celtic Blues band will take the stage at Ashley Pond 7 p.m. Aug. 19 for a one‑hour concert featuring modern twists on traditional jigs, reels and airs. Bronach Celtic Blues is a trio based in Los Alamos. The group includes Jonathan Dowell on electric mountain dulcimer, Tessa Dowell on bodhran (Irish drum) and pennywhistle, and David Sarnowski on guitar.

    This show is part of the summer “Tuesdays at the Pond” concert series by the Los Alamos Creative District.
    The group’s next concert will be at the Labor Day Festival, 1 p.m. Aug. 30 in Jemez Springs.
    For more information, visit facebook.com/BronachCelticBlues. 

  • Smith’s Marketplace donated $5,000 toward the new nature center to fund exhibits. Store Director Erik Boehm presented a check to Pajarito Environmental Education Center Executive Director Katie Watson Friday morning. So far, just over $1 million has been raised.

  •  

    Friday’s Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series show will be at Del Norte Credit Union, 1000 Trinity Dr. “We’re calling the evening ‘Co-op Night’ and we thank DNCU, Zia Credit Union, LA Schools CU, LA Food Co-op and the Española Community Market for their support of the Series and support of our town,” Coordinator Russ Gordon said.

    Friday’s concert is free of charge thanks to the sponsors in the community and starts at 7 p.m. The public is asked to bring their own chairs.
    The music will be by Guy Forsyth and his new band, the Hot Nut Riveters from Austin, Texas. Forsyth was the original lead singer of the Asylum Street Spankers and he called them “Texas’ original Recession Era band.”

    “That band played two of the most bizarre, fun and downright naughty concerts this town has ever seen,” Gordon said. “When I found out that Guy Forsyth was leading his own roots-rock and blues band about five years ago we booked that outstanding group three different times and they we’re tremendous musicians and great entertainers.”

  • The Los Alamos Co-op Market will host its first ever Truckload Sale this weekend as part of its Member Appreciation Days.
    The sale is scheduled for Saturday and Sunday at the co-op, located at the Entrada Business Park.
    Along with the sale — which will feature discounts on several items, including deli items — there will also be live music, chair massages, a bouncy house and scavenger hunt both days.
    The Co-op also has a pair of cooking classes scheduled, one coming up Tuesday and the other set for Sept. 9.
    Tuesday, Lisa Bakosi will host the Shop with the Chef class. Bakosi is a local nutritionist and author and will share recipes from her book, “Balance for Busy Moms.”
    Chemistry of Cooking is scheduled for Sept. 9. In that class, Ray Joggerst will speak about emulsions, dispersions, protein denaturation and what makes foods gel.
    Joggerst’s class is being held in conjunction with the Los Alamos Science Fest.
    Both classes begin at 6 p.m.
    For more information on the Co-op, visit its website, losalamos.coop, or call 695-1579.

  • The League of Women Voters’ monthly community event, Lunch with a Leader will feature Los Alamos Monitor publisher, Ben Carlson. The talk will start at 11:45 a.m. Aug. 19 at the Mesa Public Library.
    Carlson joined the Los Alamos Monitor in February 2014 as the newspaper’s publisher. The Landmark Community Newspaper asked him to relocate from Central Kentucky following the resignation of Keven Todd.
    Carlson is a native of Western New York and a U.S. Air Force veteran. He met his wife, Cyndie while in the service. They have five children and two grandchildren.
    His previous work experience includes being editor of The Brunswick Beacon in Shallotte, North Carolina, senior editor of CBS Sports.com in Fort Lauderdale, editor of the Livingston County News in Geneseo, New York, sports editor of the Rochester Free Press in Rochester New York, and sports editor of The Evening Tribune in Hornell, New York.
    Along with numerous awards for news and opinion writing, Carlson was the 2013 Kentucky Sheriff’s Association Citizen of the Year and has served in a variety of civic capacities, including Chamber of Commerce board member and leadership roles in Rotary, Kiwanis and the American Red Cross.

  • Santa Fe is home to four centuries of Spanish-American heritage, the Southwest’s premier art scene and a vibrant assortment of brunch locations. Ranging from French to Mexican and Southeast Asian cuisine, Santa Fe’s culinary scene is all about new ways to spice up the classics, including American bacon and eggs, Tex-Mex huevos rancheros and breakfast burritos. No other locale brings together Southwestern charm and culinary savvy like America’s second oldest city.

    Pantry Restaurant
    Nothing typifies down to earth, homestyle Santa Fe cooking more than the family-owned Pantry Café. New Mexican specialties include eggs with chorizo, omelettes stuffed with chile relleno, huevos rancheros and huevos consuelo. More classic brunch fare from oatmeal, granola, pancakes and French toast leaves little more to be desired, while the breakfast steak promises to satiate even the most voracious ranchero.
    Alongside lunch options spanning burgers, sandwiches and salads, an entire menu section is devoted to “New Mexican Traditions,” ensuring an authentic taste of the southwest.
    Now entering their sixth decade of service to Santa Fe, the Pantry is a pillar of New Mexican brunch. 1820 Cerrillos Road.

    Palacio Café