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Features

  • By Kelly Dolejsi
    Special to the Monitor

    The more depressing something is, the harder we need to laugh, and “Paper Moon” (1973, rated PG) offers just the right combination of anguish and glee. Check it out at 6:30 p.m. Thursday in Mesa Public Library’s upstairs meeting-room theater.

    Director Peter Bogdanovich’s Depression-era comedy begins in a Kansas cemetery. Nine-year-old Addie Loggins (Tatum O’Neal) has just lost her mother. When traveling salesman Moses Pray (Ryan O’Neal) arrives to pay his respects, Addie’s neighbors talk him into driving Addie to the home of her only living relative, an aunt in St. Joseph, Missouri.

    Pray has the parenting skills of a popped balloon, but off they go, and he immediately uses her tragic situation to the profitable tune of $200. It’s the start of a propitious partnership for both Addie and “Moze,” as long as you don’t think for a second about Addie’s future. 

  • The annual Breakfast with Santa, sponsored by the Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos, with a large contribution from Del Norte Credit Union, will be held this Saturday from 7-11 a.m. at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.
    The breakfast is free. In return, attendees are requested to donate either non-perishable food items or money.
    Food collected will be used by LA Cares to feed local families in need. Money donated will be used for the Kiwanis/CYFD Foster Children Christmas party. Any money left over from the Foster Children’s party will be used to make up food baskets, which will also be distributed to those in need.
    Come out and see Santa and enjoy a good breakfast and a morning of good cheer in the true Christmas spirit.
     

  • THURSDAY
    Nature Yoga at 5:15 p.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Cost is $15 for non-members, $12 for members.
    FRIDAY
    Join the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra at 7 p.m. for a Holiday Pops Concert at Crossroads Bible Church.

    Feature Film and Talk: “Exploding Universe” at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Voyage through space and discover explosive events that shaped the Universe and hear from astrophysicist Dr. Rick Wallace. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.

    Los Alamos Garden Club annual fresh Christmas Wreath Sale, from 9 a.m. until they are sold out, in the lobby of the Los Alamos National Bank. The wreaths are made of fresh green cut in the Jamez Mountains. The proceeds from the sale support a scholarship fund. The club awards a scholarship to a local  graduating senior each year. For more information, contact Sally Warner at 662-9473.

    Ribbon Cutting for Bradbury Association Kiosk at 11:30 a.m. The non-profit Bradbury Science Museum Association, which will operate a kiosk inside the Bradbury Science Museum selling tourist friendly items, is having its ribbon cutting inside the museum.

  • As we have just spent some glorious time celebrating Thanksgiving, I hope that is just the start of your thankfulness.
    As we approach a new calendar year, more than in year’s past, we need to celebrate the little and big things that make life great.
    We need to talk about the good and not let the bad creep into daily life. There are many obstacles as we navigate each day, but we must set the tone for positivity.
    We need to highlight something each day that should be elevated into conversation. It is easy to let someone bring you down, but flip the story and bring someone up instead of down.
    If you can’t think of one, find a few simple phrases that may put someone on the spot to come up with a good story.
    Tell me about your favorite book? Tell me something fun about your grandson? What did you do over the holiday break? What are you looking forward to for the next holiday break?
    Have you thought of any good presents to give or receive this year? What’s the best handmade gift you ever received? What is a good movie you have rented lately? What’s a good idea for dinner tonight?
    It is easy if you think about it, you take something you really want to know, put a positive question around it and there you go.

  • Art exhibits
    “Oblique Views: Archaeology, Photography and Time.” Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, 710 Camino Lejo, Santa Fe. Photographer Adriel Heisey re-photographed some of southwest’s most significant archeological sites that Charles Lindbergh and his wife, Anne, photographed in 1929. Exhibit runs through May 2017.

    Zane Bennett Contemporary Art announces form & concept, a nonprofit arts organization founded to push and explore the boundaries of perceived distinctions between art, craft and design. The programming acts as a conversation between these disciplines, supporting contemporary creative practice through exhibitions of regional and international artists. Form & concept serves the community through its educational programming by producing artist residencies, workshops, lectures and other events.

    “Visual Poetry: Bill Barrett Sculpture” at the Santa Fe Botanical Garden at Museum Hill. The exhibit will showcase 16 sculptures by the nationally and internationally recognized sculptor Bill Barrett, who is based in Santa Fe and New York City. The show will be on view within the Botanical Garden, 715 Camino Lejo, and is included in the general admission cost. The show will run through May 14, 2017.

  • In what has become a popular seasonal tradition in Los Alamos, the musicians of the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra will again present the annual Holiday Concert at 7 p.m. Friday at the Crossroads Bible Church.
    Under the baton of conductor Tjett Gerdom, the full symphony will play popular versions of well known seasonal tunes.  
    The concert will also include excerpts from Bizet’s L’Arlesienne Suite No. 2 and from Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite.
    An appealing feature of this special concert is the free raffle drawing, open to anyone in the audience – young or old.
    The winner will stand on the podium, take the baton from maestro Gerdom and lead the orchestra in “Jingle Bells”
    A sing-along is also included in this concert.
    Doors for the concert open at 6:30 p.m.  
    The concert is a gift from the orchestra to the community.  
    There is no charge although donations will be gratefully appreciated.

  • Join the holiday fun with the BESC Hillstrummers ukulele group playing several December Holiday Singalongs.
    The first was enjoyed by diners attending the two Thanksgiving luncheons at the BESC on Nov. 18.
    The following singalongs are scheduled:  
    • 10 a.m. Friday in the day room at Sombrillo Nursing Home.
    • 10:45 a.m. Saturday in the Pajarito room at Fuller Lodge during the WinterFest Open House.
    • 11 a.m. Dec. 9 in the produce lobby at Smith’s Marketplace.
    • 10 a.m. Dec. 15 at the indoor Farmer’s Market at Fuller Lodge.
    The group’s talented director Kathleen Galbraith has driven over 3,600 miles from the Chama area this year to conduct spring and fall classes for over 45 students.
    Between class sessions, the group practices informally year round at the BESC for fun.
    Come and sing some of your favorite Holiday tunes accompanied by this fantastic little instrument.

  • BY DEBBIE STONE
    Special to the Monitor

  • Right about now, some residents are getting their floats ready for the annual Los Alamos Holiday Lights Parade. They are also making luminarias, and Santa is transforming the Sheriff’s Posse Lodge into his workshop.
    It’s that time of year again when WinterFest comes to Los Alamos. The festivities will begin this Friday with the Los Alamos LDS Church’s annual Creche Show. Nativity scenes featuring the Christ child, will be on display at the church starting Friday night. The event, which has been a crowd favorite for over 20 years, promises to delight attendees again this year. Nativity scenes from many different cultures across the world will be displayed. Those wishing to lend their creches for display are encouraged to visit the church early Friday morning. They can pick them up after the show ends on Saturday at 4 p.m. The event goes from 2 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Friday, and from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. It will be at the Los Alamos LDS Church, 1967 18th Street.

  • The time has come to look to the future and the holiday season. Head on over to kick start the joy of the holidays at the annual Festival of Trees at the Betty Ehart Senior Center from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday.
    The trees are up and on display now through Thursday during normal business hours with a grand finale Saturday for final bidding.
    More than 70 items, including trees, wreaths, ornaments and decorations on display and available through silent auction and bidders need not be present to win. The Saturday showcase will feature a craft fair, free pictures with Santa and musical talents of local artists.
    While admission is free, donations of lunch and snack items or pre-packaged cookies are a suggested donation to benefit local school children.
    The funds raise money for two local non-profits, the Los Alamos Retired and Senior Organization (LARSO) and Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA).
    “There is a bear tree with a sign that says ‘Don’t feed the bears – they are already stuffed,” says LARSO Executive Director Pauline Powell Schneider. “There are trees with birds, snowmen, angels, Sweet Christmas, it’s a Gingerbread World, wreaths that are rustic, some that sparkle, others with berries or holly, and centerpieces with snowmen and candy canes.”

  • The Los Alamos Historical Society announced its 2016-2017 lecture series, “Multiple Perspectives of the Atomic Bomb.”
    Visit losalamoshistory.org for a listing and schedule of lectures and events.
    The lectures are at Fuller Lodge on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m., unless noted otherwise.
    The Los Alamos Historical Society’s November lecture will feature a panel on the Manhattan Project National Historical Park, including the first Los Alamos appearance of new MPNHP Superintendent Kris Kirby.
    The lecture is set for 7 p.m. Nov. 15 at Fuller Lodge
    The Manhattan Project National Historical Park was established in November 2015 to preserve portions of three World War II sites where the United States developed the first atomic weapons.
    Managed in partnership with the Department of Energy, the three sites that make up the park are located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Los Alamos and Hanford, Washington.
    Kirby is a veteran National Park Service employee, most recently designated as permanent superintendent of the new park. She has extensive experience in NPS partnerships, including her most recent assignment at Yosemite National Park as chief of Business and Revenue Management. Before that, she served as chief of commercial services at Lake Mead National Recreation Area and previously worked in concessions management at Glacier National Park

  • The Santa Fe Symphony will ring in the holidays with “Carols and Choruses” in the majestic Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi Dec. 2.
    The audience will be able to sing along to some of the most beloved Christmas carols of all time as they enjoy the angelic voices of The Symphony Chorus, accompanied by the glorious sounds of The Symphony Brass and organ. This concert starts at 7 p.m. and is the symphony’s gift to the Santa Fe community during the holiday season.
    No tickets are required. Admission is free.
    The Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi is located at 131 Cathedral Place in Santa Fe.
    Executive Director Gregory Heltman notes “members of The Symphony Brass are passionate about their instruments and music.” Over the years, the group has performed at many community and donor events as well as their holiday appearances at the Cathedral Basilica.

  • Bandelier National Monument, Valles Caldera National Preserve and Manhattan Project National Historical Park have announced that the National Park Service and other federal agencies will offer one more Fee Free Day this year on Thursday, Veterans Day.
    On that day, federal areas nationwide, including Bandelier and the Valles Caldera, will offer free admission to everyone. Manhattan Project NHP has no entry fee.
    Veterans Day began as Armistice Day, celebrating the end of World War I on Nov. 11, 1918. In 1954 it was officially renamed Veterans Day in the U.S. to expand it to honor all veterans, not just those who fought in World War I.  It still coincides with the Armistice Day holiday celebrated in many other countries. 
    As Bandelier Superintendent Jason Lott said, “Veterans Day is a very appropriate day for the parks to honor all our veterans, by inviting people all over the country to enjoy and celebrate the lands that these brave men and women have valiantly protected and defended.”  
    The Manhattan Project NHP is open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays.
    At Bandelier, the shuttle service has ended for this year, so visitors should just drive on down to the parking lot at the monument Visitor Center. 

  • Pajarito Environmental Education Center will host artist Lisa Coddington, who will teach a two-day workshop on drawing and watercolor using botanical and natural subjects. The class will be held from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the Los Alamos Nature Center.
    Coddington’s class is open to all, from beginners to advanced artists.
    Participants will explore pencil and watercolor techniques that portray plants and animals in this hands-on workshop. With easy to understand demonstrations and Master artist examples, Lisa will work to reinforce confidence in creating dimensional Autumn-themed subjects.
    A minimum of eight students is required for the class, so those interested in the workshop are encouraged to register on the PEEC website by Thursday. Otherwise, the class will be canceled if there is not enough interest.
    Artist/instructor Coddington earned her master of art degree at Syracuse in Illustration. She has illustrated a children’s book and has received commissions by regional and national firms for her artwork and art instruction.

  • A Los Alamos punk rock musician hopes to shake up the classical music world with three compositions he has produced into YouTube videos.
    K.L. Fortson hopes his creations will make people think differently about orchestral music.
    The videos of “Untitled for Guitar and String Quartet,” “Arecibo Calling Kafka” and “Whales Floating Belly Up” can be found at klfortson.com.
    Classical music is a bit of a departure for Fortson, who has toured extensively for punk rock bands before embarking on the project.
    “I wanted to do more complex music, and I also wanted to more non-lyrical music,” he said. “I was also drawn to the fact that it doesn’t have any concrete meeting.”
    Fortson is a 2006 graduate of the University of New Mexico. He majored in criminology and has always been interested in the arts, especially music and painting.
    “I took a class called ‘Deviance’ based on the name. It sounded really fascinating. I just liked how psychology, sociology and business were really studying the same facets of humanity but through a different lens,” he said. “I’ve always liked propaganda and media, and that’s what drew me to those.” Those interested can find more of his art on the website.

  • The Pajarito Astronomers will host the last county-sponsored dark night at 5:45 p.m. Nov. 5 at Spirio Soccer Field at Overlook Park in White Rock, weather permitting.
    The public is invited to come out, wander among the telescopes, and star gaze. Five planets will potentially be visible during the evening: Venus, Mars, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. There will be a tour of the late-summer and fall and early-winter constellations, and there will be telescope views of double stars, star clusters, nebulae and galaxies.  
    The public is invited and encouraged to attend. Viewing will end before midnight. Call Steve at 662-3252 for information.

  • Performers will present  exerpts from “The 1940s Radio Hour” performed by members of the cast of the Little Theatre at the noontime Brown Bag Lunch Nov. 2 at Fuller Lodge.
    Attendees will hear eight big band-era songs and will get a peek from a scene in the show.
    Laurie Tomlinson is the director and Gretchen Amstutz is the musical director for this musical comedy. Tomlinson and Amstutz have co-directed many musicals together, including “Annie Get your Gun” in 2007, “The Sound of Music” in 2009, and “Into the Woods” in 2011 for the Los Alamos Light Opera. “The Spitfire Grill” was their first musical collaboration at the Little Theatre. They have also collaborated together as a director-producer combo, bringing “The Woman in Black” and, most recently, “Steel Magnolias” to the Little Theatre’s stage.
    “The 1940s Radio Hour” is a musical play written by Walton Jones that is full of music of the era, dancing and old-time sound effects. The play portrays the final holiday broadcast of the Mutual Manhattan Variety Cavalcade on the New York radio station WOV in December 1942.
    The audience may recognize many well-known songs of the 1940s, such as “The Lady is a Tramp,” “Blue Moon” and many more.

  • TODAY
    Gentle Walks at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.

    Fourth Friday Fractals at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. See fractals in nature as a full-dome planetarium show! Cost is $10 for adults, $8 for children. More information at peecnature.org.

    Trick–or–Treat on MainStreet will haunt downtown Los Alamos from 4 p.m. on Central Avenue, between 15th to 20th streets.

    High Tech Halloween at the Bradbury Science Museum from 4-6:30 p.m. Interactive demonstration of a vacuum chamber, a simulated chain reaction using lights and optics and a “Critter Alley.”

    Pet Costume Parade starts at 5:30 p.m. on Central Avenue. Participants should meet at the Ashley Pond Elephant statue by 5:15 P.M. Festivities will continue at the Family Y for a costume climb from 6-8 p.m.
    SATURDAY
    Pumpkin Carving Contest at 10 a.m. at Smith’s Marketplace.

    Masquerade Recital and annual Pumpkin Glow from 6-9 p.m. at Fuller Lodge.

    Halloweekend Dance from 6:30-9 p.m. at Fuller Lodge.

  • The Los Alamos High School Olions, the theatre club at Los Alamos High School, won six awards last weekend at the New Mexico State University High Desert High School Theatre Festival and New Mexico Activities Association State High School One-Act Production Competition.
    Olions took first place in the NMAA One-Act Production competition and first place for the best backstage crew.
    Brad Parker was also awarded the Ovation Award for Administrators and Volunteers, Chas Shay was awarded an Ovation Award for Inspirational Teachers, Dylan Mauldin was selected to be a part of the All-Festival Cast, and Sydney Shelton won third place for her poster design.
    Dylan Mauldin, Joseph Sarrao and Elia Vasquez made up the cast, and Jerome Colletti, Tory Hughes, Daniel Sarrao, Opale Schappert and Sydney Shelton made up the crew.
    Olions will be performing the award-winning one act “Words, Words, Words” by David Ives the first weekend in December along with three student-directed one acts.
    Olions will be performing “The 39 Steps by Patrick Barlow” Nov. 3 through Nov. 5, Nov. 18, and Nov. 19.
    Both performances will take place in the Topper Theatre Blackbox at LAHS.

  • JERUSALEM (AP) — In the innermost chamber of the site said to be the tomb of Jesus, a restoration team has peeled away a marble layer for the first time in centuries in an effort to reach what it believes is the original rock surface where Jesus’ body was laid.
    Many historians have long believed that the original cave, identified a few centuries after Jesus’ death as his tomb, was obliterated ages ago.
    But an archaeologist accompanying the restoration team said ground penetrating radar tests determined that cave walls are in fact standing — at a height of six feet and connected to bedrock — behind the marbled panels of the chamber at the center of Jerusalem’s Church of the Holy Sepulchre.
    “What was found,” said National Geographic archaeologist Fredrik Hiebert, “is astonishing.”
    The work is part of a historic renovation project to reinforce and preserve the Edicule, the chamber housing the cave where Jesus was entombed and resurrected. It is the centerpiece of one of Christianity’s oldest churches and one of its most important shrines.
    “I usually spend my time in Tut’s tomb,” said Hiebert about the Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun’s burial site, “but this is more important.”