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Features

  • Get those cameras ready, polish those smiles and say cheese. Or tuna. Or kibble.
    Friends of the Shelter is accepting photo entries for the 2015 Shelter Alumni Calendar through Sept. 6.
    Pet owners who have adopted a shelter animal, or an abandoned or homeless animal are invited to send a photo and a brief story about their pet. Pet owners whose pets were featured in last year’s calendar are welcome to submit new photos of their pets for this year’s calendar.
    Entry forms are available at Animal Clinic of Los Alamos, Ridgeview Veterinary Hospital, Pet Pangaea and the Los Alamos Animal Shelter.
    The entry forms include entry information, as well as tips on getting great photos of your pet. Entries can be submitted by mail to Friends of the Shelter, P.O. Box 1402, Los Alamos 87544, or electronically to virginiaking65@gmail.com, or via the shelter’s website at lafos.org.
    Friends of the Shelter, a humane organization based in Los Alamos is trying to improve the quality of life for unwanted pets and find homes for homeless animals.
    FOS works closely with the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter, local veterinarians and other humane societies.

  • This year marks the 22nd Annual Butterfly Count in Los Alamos County, but this year the count carries a special meaning. This is the first such count since the passing of Living Treasure Dorothy Hoard, who initiated the Los Alamos County annual butterfly counts more than 20 years ago.
    As such, the annual butterfly count will from now on be known as the “Dorothy Hoard Memorial Butterfly Count.” On Aug. 8, New Mexico butterfly guru Steve Cary will lead the count. In preparation for the count, butterfly enthusiast Roy Michelotti will present “Butterflies You Might See in Los Alamos, and Some Fun Facts About Butterflies” Aug. 5 at PEEC.
    The count this year will be from 9 a.m. to about 3:30 p.m. Aug. 8. Cary will identify butterflies and discuss their habits and life histories with count participants. Butterflies in three different habitats will be counted — mesa top, streamside and high altitude. 
    The count will be at Burnt Mesa in Bandelier on N.M. 4. The group will then move on to Cañon de Valle on N.M. 501 (West Jemez Road), expecting to arrive at about 10:30 a.m. At around noon, the group will go up to Camp May to have lunch and then continue counting until 3:30 p.m.

  • The historic D.H. Lawrence Ranch in Taos County will now be open to the public, thanks to a cooperative agreement between the University of New Mexico (UNM), D.H. Lawrence Ranch Alliance and the Taos Community Foundation.
    The ranch, which has been closed to the public since 2010, is accessible from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday through October.
    The Taos Community Foundation established a grant to hire a UNM staff member who will provide public tours and information of the property. The Taos-based D.H. Lawrence Ranch Alliance is also working with UNM-Taos to create a volunteer docent program to staff the ranch on a regular basis. In fact, UNM-Taos is offering a course designed to acquaint prospective docent volunteers with the ranch and the writer. Visit taoscf.org/dh-lawrence-ranch for details.
    Lawrence was a renowned 19th century writer revered for his achievements in other artistic forms including travel writing, journalism, drama and painting, among others. Nine of his oil paintings have been on display in the La Fonda Hotel in Taos since his death. Lawrence is best known for his works, “Sons and Lovers,” “The Rainbow,” “Women in Love” and “Lady Chatterley’s Lover.”

  • Los Alamos
    Rose Chocolatier, 991 Central Ave.
    Date inspected: June 10
    Violations: One low-risk violation. Restroom door needs to be self closing.
    Status of Establishment: Approved for opening. No follow up required.
    Pojoaque
    Pojoaque Valley Little League, address not available
    Date inspected: June 11
    Violations: Three high-risk violations. Food stored at improper temperatures, which was corrected at time of inspection. Sanitizer ammonia levels are too high, which was also corrected. Three compartment sink needs two inch air gap between sink and wall. One moderate-risk violation. Crock pots used must be NSF. Two low-risk violations. Hood and vents need to be turned. Screen doors need to be replaced.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. Follow up required on Aug. 20.
    Santa Fe
    Santa Fe High School, 2100 Yucca Road
    Date inspected: June 6
    Violations: One high-risk violation. Food temperatures in danger zone, milk sitting in sun waiting to be loaded. One moderate-risk violation. Ice machine has grime build up. Two low-risk violations. Food storage item boxes on floor, must be six inches off the floor. Coolers are loaded with food out side.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. Follow up required on June 16.

  • The Pajarito Environmental Education Center will be holding a four-week course beginning Wednesday, in which two local experts, Terry Foxx and Craig Martin, will teach the group how to identify wildflowers. The course will combine classroom learning with fieldwork, so that participants will come away with the ability to distinguish wildflowers on their own.
    Each session will be from 5:30-7:30 p.m. The first class on this Wednesday will be a classroom session at PEEC, and the remaining three sessions (Aug. 6, 13 and 20) will be conducted in the field. The group will go to different elevations to see plants that grow in different habitats, for example Camp May, Ponderosa Pine and Piñon-Juniper. Participants should dress for hiking, bring water and other materials. The hikes will be easy and generally very slow, because the group will be talking about various plants and spending time working with keys and text.
    The cost for all four sessions, including a materials fee, is $58 for PEEC members, and $70 for non-members.
    Advance registration is required and only 15 spots are available, so those interested are encouraged to sign up soon by visiting PajaritoEEC.org, emailing Programs@PajaritoEEC.org, or calling 662-0460.

  • First of all, as an adult, I apologize to all students for the rash of commercials for back to school.
    Can you imagine if we had to see commercials for all of the things we have to do at work, over and over again?
    Yes, the time is almost here, but it seems so very early.
    Registration for middle school is Friday and Monday, with a great orientation on Aug. 12 and high school registration is Aug. 5-6.
    Elementary schools are getting ready for the meet the teacher and the days when families can drop off the multitude of school supplies. Oh, those are some really fun days when the whole family can enjoy the gatherings.
    This year the middle school has a great new program for the incoming seventh graders and the high school has one for freshmen.
    Staff members have been taking classes and putting plans in place for new programs and projects.
    A great deal of landscaping has taken place to trim the weeds, plant new things and add some new items for the upcoming school year.
    Custodian and facilities staff have been working hard, painting, cleaning and waxing to put a shine on everything in sight.
    Now the rest is up to parents and caregivers. After a bit more time for fun, it will be time to get a few things in order for the big day.

  • July 27-Aug. 2, 2014
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

  •  

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:

    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html

    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. weekends.

    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care.

    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.

     

     

    CATS

    Bindi — A 10-month-old spayed female, tabby with white. She came to the shelter from Taos. This petite girl loves to play, but she also enjoys taking naps in the sun once she’s worn out from playing. She is a very small kitty and most likely will remain petite. Initially shy, she has now warmed up, thriving on making new kitty friends and greeting shelter visitors.

     

  •  

    Today 

    Downtown Dogs. A weekly walking group for dogs and humans. The walk starts from Pet Pangaea at 6 p.m. on Thursday nights for a stroll around downtown Los Alamos. Bring a leash, no longer than six feet.

     

    Authors Speak Series. Steven F. Havill. Novelist will discuss recently released “Night Zone, a Posadas County mystery.” 7 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library Upstairs Rotunda. 

     

    Book signing and discussion. “New Mexico’s High Peaks,” by Mike Butterfield. 4 p.m. at the Los Alamos Historical Society.  

  •  Registration is open now for the First Glass Fusing Class from noon-2:30 p.m. Saturday at Bullseye Glass Resource Center in Santa Fe. 

    Participants can learn art glass techniques, relax, create and donate to Self Help, Inc. all at the same time.

    Based on the number of participants registered for this class, Bullseye Glass will donate up to $800 to Self Help, Inc., a nonprofit organization founded in 1969 and dedicated to assisting people in need.

    The First Glass Fusing Class is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of creating glass objects in the kiln. Class participants use a wide range of glass colors, shapes and styles to create an 8-inch by 8-inch plate. 

    No experience is necessary, and all materials and instruction are covered by the tuition. 

  •  

    A call for auditions is being held for “And Then There Were None,” by Agatha Christie at the Los Alamos Little Theater. 

    Times are 2-4 p.m. Aug. 3 and 6-7 p.m. Aug. 6 at the Performing Arts Center main theater, and 7-8 p.m. Aug. 6 at the Performing Arts Center Green Room.

    Auditions can also be by special appointment with the director. Contact Dennis Powell at dennis.powell@yahoo.com. 

    During auditions, the use of accents is optional. Participants are encouraged to attempt an appropriate accent for the character, but it is not mandatory. 

  •  Organizers of the newest cyclist-centric festival to hit Los Alamos — “Rock-n-Roll EnduroFest” — are hoping that the event will gain speed among festival goers with many family-friendly activities for cyclists and non-cyclists alike, including guided rides, kids races, live music, microbreweries and bike races. 

    The event is slated for Aug. 1-3 at Pajarito Mountain Ski Area. 

    “The trails surrounding Los Alamos and the Pajarito Mountain Ski Area trail system are mostly an undiscovered gem for all types of mountain biking,” said organizer Steve Watts. “We wanted to showcase our trails, our people, and our orientation around fun and adrenalin sports by putting on this family friendly event. We also enjoy good food and handcrafted beer, so we had to sneak these into the weekend’s events.”

  • When you look at tiny Missy, it’s hard to see how someone could throw her out of a moving vehicle in Española. But, two weeks ago, someone did and the 7-week-old kitten was lucky to escape with only minor injuries.
    Although a witness was able to write down the license plate number, local authorities have been unable to track down the driver, and the tiny tabby is recovering in foster care.
    But, like Missy, the staff at Española Valley Humane Society wants to move past the tragedy and focus on the kitten’s future. “We don’t know who did this to Missy, but it is certain that it was someone who did not love her. So, now it is time for us to find her someone who does,” said Linda Sanchez, foster care coordinator.
    And that’s exactly what shelter staff plans to do. At the Seventh Annual Santa Fe Kitten Festival, the shelter plans to have nearly 100 cats and kittens up for adoption at two locations, all in search of permanent, loving families.
    Missy will be there, but so will Peony, a 10-month-old Tortoiseshell kitten who was surrendered by her owner nursing four kittens of her own, and Jake — one of four polydactyl kittens.

  • Santa Fe
    La Comida de Los Niños, 1121 Alto St.
    Date inspected: June 5
    Violations: One moderate-risk violation. Thermal test strips not available.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Izanami, 3451 Hyde Park Road
    Date inspected: June 8
    Violations: Five high-risk violations. Refrigeration units out of temperature. Wet rag out of sanitizer bucket. Employee drinks over food prep area. Ice scoop has food build up. Freezer holding food with a date of May 15 when it is not frozen. Prep area is under drain lines.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. Follow up from previous inspection. No further follow up required.

    Five and Dime, 58 E. San Francisco St.
    Date inspected: June 8
    Violations: Three low-risk violations. Ice cream wet wall with leak. Peeling paint in food prep area. Ceiling in dry storage is in need of repair.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

  • The Valles Caldera National Preserve will host the Jemez Mountains Storytelling Jamboree from 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday at the Valle Grande staging area located just inside the preserve’s main entrance. There is no admission charge to attend the jamboree.
    The jamboree is the highlight of the 2014 birthday celebration that commemorates the creation of the Preserve.
    On July 25, 2000, President Bill Clinton signed the Valles Caldera Preservation Act, which created the Valles Caldera Trust and the Preserve. The three-day birthday celebration begins Friday and runs through Sunday.
    Storyteller and librarian Steven Plá returns this year to emcee the storyteller event and to perform along with five other storytellers.
    Plá believes that “the magic of story helps people understand each other and the fascinating and diverse worldwide community.”
    This year’s amazing storyteller line-up includes Emmy Award winning writer, producer and performing artist, Indiana Bones (aka Mike McCartney); puppeteer Brenda Hollingsworth-Marley, living history performer Linda Batlin, folklorist Kay Negash, and Pueblo of Jemez storyteller Paul Tosa.

  • Look up on a summer night in Los Alamos and there is so much to explore. That’s exactly why the Pajarito Environmental Education Center decided to host a star party for its final Summer Family Evening of 2014 on July 29.
    Those wishing to attend should meet at PEEC by 8:30 p.m. to drive to the viewing site.
    The star party will have learning opportunities for both kids and their parents, with instruction and stories by Chick Keller.
    The summer sky shows off the Milky Way, which is the galaxy seen edge-on from its center way out into its spiral arms. 
    During the star party, Keller will talk about what we know of the galaxy’s spiral shape and show where dust clouds obscure much of it.
    The group will have a chance to look at objects and discuss what’s going on in the night sky, such as star formation, age-old remnants, clusters, nebulae and more. And of course, they will be able to look at whatever planets are in the sky, certainly Mars and Saturn.
    In case of rain, this program will be rescheduled for July 30. The event is free to attend, and no advance registration is required.
    To learn more about this and other PEEC programs, visit PajaritoEEC.org or contact 662-0460 or Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.  

  • Volunteers from the Pajarito Environmental Education Center and the Wildlife Center in Española teamed up for “Animals of the Southwest” July 11 at Bradbury Science Museum. 

  • Today is one of those days where my column might annoy you. I heartily welcome your eye roll.
    Today I’m going to ask you to have conversation with your kids.
    Summer time is a time to decompress, relax, spend time doing things because there is more free time. I’m not talking about school personnel; I’m talking about our youth.
    I know it might not be easy and perhaps you haven’t done it in a while, but as long as they still live in your home, there’s always a chance to begin a dialogue.
    As school is two and a half weeks away, perhaps start by asking them what kinds of things they think they might need. When kids are in the older grades, there’s not always a list of supplies to get you started.
    When kids are younger, it is easy to take them to annual physicals, the dentist and other appointments to allow us to keep tabs on them, but that gets a little harder for some when as the years go by.
    As kids become teens one of the best parts about the Children’s Clinic is that they have the parent step out and they ask youth some pretty important questions that may lead to some good conversation, too.
    Big problems don’t start big; there are often signals, issues, or light bulbs that go on along the way.

  • The second annual Los Alamos Beer Co-op Fiesta is on Saturday at Pajarito Mountain Ski Area. The Fiesta features lift-served biking and hiking from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., as well as a New Mexico brewers fest with live music from Felix y Los Gatos, noon to 6 p.m. Atomic City Transit Shuttle will run from Sullivan Field every half hour from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    As part of the Fiesta, other Los Alamos cooperative businesses will attend to support the community and fellow cooperative. Representatives of the co-ops will be on hand to provide information about their cooperative business and to explain why everyone should “Keep it Co-op, Los Alamos.”
    Co-ops in Los Alamos include:
    • Los Alamos Beer Co-op (brewery/tap room)
    • Los Alamos Co-op Market (grocery)
    • Little Forest PlaySchool (child care/education)
    • Del Norte Credit Union (financial)
    • Los Alamos Schools Credit Union (financial)
    • Zia Credit Union (financial)
    Tickets are $10. For more information visit losalamosbeer.coop