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Today's Opinions

  • Green across the border

    The Greener Side is in a pre-fab metal building that looks something like a failed truckers’ pornstop, just off the interstate outside Pueblo, Colo. There’s no billboard and only the adjacent greenhouse, surrounded by a chain-link fence topped with strands of barbed wire, tips off the astute shopper that this is the first legal retailer of “recreational” marijuana north of Uruguay.
    Half the cars in the parking lot are from out of state, mostly from Oklahoma, Texas and Kansas. A security guard swipes my New Mexico license through a card reader, confirming that I’m legally eligible to buy up to one-quarter ounce of marijuana for my personal use, and I join the line of customers inside.
    With its cheap paneling and hard plastic chairs, the tiny anteroom resembles a cut-rate dentist’s waiting room, but the atmosphere is much more cheerful. For about half the customers this is a first-time experience, and everybody is studying the menu on the wall and discussing the pros and cons of the various strains on offer.

  • Web presence begins with a strong marketing strategy

    Building a business website is much like any other construction project: The better the foundation, the better the results — and the savings in time and money.
    While laying the groundwork for an online debut, the business owner should consider how a website furthers the overall marketing strategy and how much of a website presence is needed to accomplish the company’s goals. A simple, highly navigable website with key information is essential when starting out. If the foundation is laid correctly, the website can expand as the company grows.
    Many businesses overextend themselves by trying to be full-service sites. Delivering multiple web-based services — a blog, a chat helpline or an online store — requires a substantial commitment of human and financial resources. If that commitment isn’t there, customers will know, and their frustration can create the perception — founded or not — that the business’ services are as unreliable as its website.
    That’s why it’s important to create a web strategy that flows from the business and marketing plans of the company. Potential clients don’t just visit a company’s website to get hours and offerings. They check to see if the business has its act together.

  • Treatments for bone cancer in dogs

    Osteosarcoma (OSA), the most common bone cancer, represents about 85 percent of bone tumors in dogs.
    These aggressive tumors spread rapidly and once diagnosed, should be taken very seriously.
    “OSA commonly affects the limbs of large or giant breed dogs, but can also occur in other parts of the skeleton, such as the skull, ribs, vertebrae and pelvis,” said Dr. Rita Ho, veterinary intern instructor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.
    Animals with limb osteosarcoma typically show signs of swelling at the affected side and associated lameness, depending upon the animal’s unique condition and tumor location.
    The tumors typically form at or near growth plates, and occasionally, the animal will exhibit a growth on their body, or painful inflammation near the site of the tumor. If swelling does exist, it is likely due to extension of the tumor into the surrounding tissues.

  • Kite Festival had many supporters

    The Los Alamos Arts Council wishes to thank the many people who came together to make the 17th Annual Los Alamos Arts Council Kite Festival sponsored by Los Alamos National Bank such a great success. The festival could not have happened without the support of so many people. We want to thank LANB, the sole sponsor, for generous funding, easy to build flyers, and T-shirts.
    We also want to thank the numerous volunteers from LANB, Los Alamos High School ROTC, National Honor Society, the county Parks and Recreation Department and various other groups and individual volunteers. All of you made a huge difference in the number of kites we were able to build and decorate each day. Thank you to those that helped with set-up and take-down, as well as the small odds and ends that happened behind the scenes. Each of you contributed to success, and we thank you for all that you did.
    We are grateful to several kite enthusiasts from out of town who brought beautiful and unusual kites and banners to make the event more colorful. Of course, we also want to thank the members of the community for coming out to make a kite, fly a kite, listen to the music, or just look at the awesome view in the sky.

  • Save Chaco Canyon

    We are fortunate to have so many beautiful places in New Mexico. Unfortunately, we have a looming threat to one of the places we hold so sacred.
    Chaco Canyon is at risk of fracking. There are only four places in the United States that have a dark sky designation. Chaco Canyon earned this designation last month, making it perfect for stargazing.
    If we don’t stand up as a community, one of New Mexico’s national parks could be obstructed with fracking rigs, their ominous lights and constant cranking and grinding, possibly ruining part of ancient New Mexico.
    We need to stand up, New Mexico. We cannot let the oil and gas giants take something so precious not only to New Mexico, but to the United States and the entire world.
    Chaco Canyon is also a World Heritage Site.
    I strongly encourage the Bureau of Land Management to keep fracking away from Chaco Canyon.
    Andrew Weinman
    Los Alamos
     

  • Earth Day was a great day

    It was a momentous day as the Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC) put on its 14th annual Earth Day Festival on May 3, because if all goes according to plan, it will be the last Earth Day festival that PEEC will celebrate at its current Orange Street location.
    By Earth Day next year, PEEC hopes to be settled into its new home at the Los Alamos County Nature Center, located on Canyon Road, slated to open next spring.
    Once again, this year PEEC welcomed the Santa Fe-based Clan Tynker, a popular Vaudeville circus group that encourages audience participation and always delights with its antics. Clan Tynker performed two shows. In between Clan Tynker’s performances, the Hill Stompers got the audience up on their feet and enjoying their always lively music and dance.
    There were information and activity booths from more than 25 organizations. We wish to thank every exhibitor for being a supporter of the Earth Day Festival.
    We are also grateful for the food vendors — Dosa Dosa and Taste of New York. The long lines at their stands were evidence of their good food. In addition, the Los Alamos Co-Op Market sold ice cream, which was appreciated by all on what turned out to be a rather warm day.

  • Doctor's absence a loss to Los Alamos

    I will be forever grateful for the wonderful care Dr. Peter Lindberg gave my mom a few years ago for her many and varied complex health issues. His absence from the Los Alamos Medical Center is our loss.
    Peggy Bradberry
    White Rock
     

  • How can we mandate mammaric modesty?

    The other day, I was sitting in the park and I saw the most disgusting thing. A woman was feeding her hungry baby.
    OK, I know how that sounds, but it was really horrible. There I was, enjoying a pleasant afternoon in the sun, and the next thing I know, this woman picks up her kid, pushes her blouse to the side, and shoves her baby’s face up against one of her breasts. He was lapping it up like a piglet. 
    Boy, if that doesn’t turn your stomach, I don’t know what will!  Sure, no one wants a baby to go hungry, but couldn’t she have the decency to find some deserted area of the park, or maybe go into a nearby building and do that in the bathroom?  If a woman can’t afford infant formula, she shouldn’t be out in public to begin with, right?
    Really, we need some laws to address stuff like this!
    Oh wait, we do have laws like that. Forty-eight states protect the rights of a nursing mother to breastfeed her child in public.
    West Virginia and Idaho haven’t yet seen fit to join the civilized crowd.
    The human race has been raising babies on mother’s milk since forever. But then in 1867, Justus von Liebig invented infant formula, and “decent society” quickly threw a modesty blanket over nursing mothers.