.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • DPU must accommodate present, future residents

    We are one of the 36 households or businesses in Los Alamos that have purchased solar panels to generate electricity. Recently, the Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities (DPU) has put out information suggesting that electricity generated by the County’s solar panel owners provides miniscule benefits to the community while unfairly burdening other customers. One Board of Public Utilities member was quoted in the Los Alamos Monitor as saying that being carbon neutral is not in the best interest of the ratepayers.
    We disagree completely with this statement. Everyone sees the trees dying around us. Partly this has been caused by the drought, and partly by the trees struggling to deal with rising temperatures during the drought. Our local climate scientists believe that most of our trees will be dead by 2050. By 2099, Los Alamos will have the temperatures that Albuquerque has now. We may be living exponentially, but we will be doing it indoors with air conditioning and outdoors with no trees and no ski area.

  • Remember N.M.'s last Republican speaker?

    New Mexico and Texas were fighting over water. Wildcatters were busy in southeastern New Mexico, while uranium drilling was under way near Grants. And Albuquerque passed a strong new civil rights ordinance.
    This was New Mexico in 1952, when voters liked Ike so much that they tilted Republican in a presidential election for the first time since 1928. They re-elected Republican Gov. Ed Mechem and sent Republicans to the state House of Representatives in record numbers. A Raton rancher became the first Republican Speaker of the House since 1929.
    After a similar sweep this month, a Republican speaker will take the gavel for the first time since 1953, so it’s time to remember Alvin Stockton.
    In 1869, Stockton’s grandparents acquired four square miles around the stage station they operated on the Santa Fe Trail from Lucien Maxwell. Stockton grew up on the family ranch and got an accounting degree from Denver University.
    Elected to the House in 1951, he served four years, becoming an authority on New Mexico’s tax system. It was once said, “If you really need to get something done on behalf of agriculture in the state Legislature, you go to Alvin Stockton.” As speaker, he was so well regarded that members passed a resolution commending him for leadership and impartiality.

  • Future with Common Core math

    Luckily John Pawlak will not have to worry about students using calculators in math in the future. When they are indoctrinated with Common Core math they will be given word problems such as this: “Juanita want to give bags of stickers to her friends. She wants to give the same number of stickers to each friend. She’s not sure if she needs 4 bags or 6 bags of stickers. How many stickers could she buy so there are no stickers left over?”
    You don’t even need to use a calculator to find the answer. Just pick a friendly number, as second graders are requested to do in Common Core math.
    Jacqueline Krohn
    Los Alamos

  • Rio Grande Foundation responds to attack

    In a recent letter attacking my organization, the Rio Grande Foundation, Jody Jones fails to make a single statement on the issue of whether Washington or New Mexico would do a better job managing lands in our State that are now controlled by Washington.
    Rather, she spends her entire letter attacking my organization and anyone affiliated with it, even going so far as to advocate for censorship! The political left has become quite hostile to free speech in recent years.
    To be clear, the Rio Grande Foundation is based in New Mexico. I have personally been to Los Alamos many times to speak to Rotary groups and the like. We have hosted speakers from ALEC and a wide variety of organizations of a free market bent, but often with differing viewpoints.
    Our most recent opinion piece merely critiqued New Mexico Senator Martin Heinrich for accusing advocates of “devolution” of some federal lands to state control when it is Washington that has taken several large tracts of land throughout the state.
    I respect differences of opinion. I’d love to hear from Jones and others what special knowledge or resources that bureaucrats in Washington have for better managing our lands than people right here in New Mexico. Alas, instead of a factual argument, we got name-calling.
    Paul J. Gessing
    President, Rio Grande Foundation

  • The people survive campaign spending

    An hour passed from our 3:05 p.m. polling place entrance until we left. The line of voters ahead of us had about 55 people. It was quiet. People chatted. One set of parents, new to the neighborhood and slightly nonplussed by the length of the line, tended their toddler.
    All of us were at the end of the process of campaigns spending a great of money to get our attention on behalf of a particular candidate. I read that a couple of legislative races crossed the $100,000 mark in spending by each candidate. Yet no one seemed addled or discombobulated by the spending. No one walked around the polling line mumbling, “Thank God, it’s over.”
    No doubt, calls for further regulation of campaign spending will continue from the do-gooders on the left (and a few on the right) who think that good behavior can be regulated into being. These people hate money and believe that people such as the firefighter in line behind me are too stupid to sort through messages and make a decision.
    Our Sen. Tom Udall is one of the leaders in this approach with his scary proposed amendment to the Constitution.

  • Chattering about Susana

    So Susana Martinez came out of her recent reelection campaign pretty much as just about everyone had expected.
    Way back when they were still making glitzy movie musicals, the wondrous Marilyn Monroe won hearts and superstardom with the proposition that “Diamonds are a Girl’s Best Friend.”
    Well over a half-century later, New Mexico’s governor for-four-more-years will tell you that if you’re going to strut your stuff today — at least in electoral politics — there’s no better friend than a big, fat campaign treasury, the bigger and the fatter the better.
    From start to finish Martinez had so much cash on hand that her campaign came off as unnecessarily squandering its resources.
    Certainly that was the case in the final weeks of her campaign, long after it was abundantly clear that she had locked it up, but nonetheless continued to sling the high-priced attack TV ad mud with an abandon that appeared almost gleeful.
    Gary King never had a chance.
    The first negative ad Martinez leveled against the erstwhile Democratic nominee prominently featured remarks once made by the state Democratic Party chairman to the effect that King was one of the worst attorneys general in state history.

  • Letters to the editor 11-9-14

     

    Understanding what peace means

    In the theater, the overture is the moment when everything begins. It gently directs our attention to the stage. It helps us willingly suspend disbelief and enter the world of possibility. The overture says, “Hush, pay attention, something wonderful is about to happen.”

    On Oct. 27, the White House released a letter (full text posted at thecommunity.com) that created in me almost exactly that feeling of wonder and anticipation. Perhaps this feeling is even better because this possibility is very real. What if now is the time when we can end, peacefully and permanently, the awful practices of “extraordinary rendition” and “enhanced interrogation techniques?”

  • We need to take care of our veterans

     

    Let me to first state the obvious. Veterans Day is for those who return from war. Memorial Day is for those who have not survived. Two days to remind us in a multitude of ways how to remember and also act. Our veterans need us now.

    On Veterans Day, it’s one day to think hard. What do we contemplate when we launch into war? Do we plan for the seemingly endless painful plight of veterans — their families, friends and communities?