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Today's Opinions

  • Pet Talk: Tips for enjoying the outdoors with a pet

    For those who enjoy the great outdoors, camping during the springtime can be a perfect weekend getaway. However, if you don’t want to leave your four-legged friends behind while setting out on your adventure, try bringing them along.
    “Many campgrounds allow pets, with certain rules and regulations,” said Dr. Mark Stickney, clinical associate professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.
    Often, the rules regarding pets can be seen posted on their website, and if not, questions can be easily answered over the phone. However, it is not advised that you show up with your pet without prior research and consent.
    “Most rules will include things such as having your pet on a leash, making sure they are supervised at all times, and requiring proof of vaccinations,” Stickney said. “Even if they don’t require health records or vaccination certificates, it’s a good idea to bring them along just in case.”

  • A cost checklist for a getting a new furry friend

    Premium food, state-of-the-art veterinary care and creature comforts most humans would envy are now a regular part of life for many American pets.
    That’s why prospective pet owners should consider financial planning before bringing home a dog, cat or other breed of animal.
    For those considering purchasing or adopting a pet, do thorough research first about what owning that animal will cost. The wide range of products, services and advanced medical options for American pets have pushed U.S. pet industry expenditures to almost $60 billion in 2014, nearly double the amount in 2004.
    With pet ownership tripling since the 1970s according to The Humane Society of the United States, it is no surprise that advanced pet products and services at high price points are making it very easy for many pet owners to overspend.
    Prospective pet owners should begin their research with an idea of first-year costs.
    The ASPCA publishes an annual estimate for a variety of pets. Purchase and adoption costs may vary based on breed, so read as much as you can about a specific pet choice.

  • Two manufacturers share machines, expertise with outside entrepreneurs

    Any entrepreneur with a product idea or prototype can find someone to build it in New Mexico.
    Two companies that do just that for a variety of clients are Marpac, a maker of devices that secure medical tubes and collars, and TEAM Technologies Inc., which designs and fabricates products that require advanced engineering and electronics.
    Both Albuquerque companies opened their doors for New Mexico Manufacturing Day activities last fall and plan to participate again this year.

    From full service to a single stitch

  • Doing the math on math

    The orphanage door was locked and the only way to open the door was to punch in a cryptic key, the deranged design of an eccentric locksmith.
    The key was a zero of a quartic equation displayed above the door, a labyrinth of logic for your average citizen.
    As smoke billowed from the rooftop, firefighters were unable to get inside to rescue the children.
    The fire chief yelled out, “Quick! We need to know how to determine the x-intercepts for this quartic!”
    Fortunately, I was ready, armed with the algebraic knowledge that allowed me to recognize the quadratic form embedded in the esoteric equation. I quickly derived the root, entered the key and rescued the children!
    OK, so this didn’t really happen. I’m still waiting for my chance to be an algorithmic hero, but I’m sure that one day, knowing how to factor a polynomial will be a life-changing event.
    When studying new concepts, my math students always ask, “What am I going to ever use this for? What good is it?”
     I could tell them, “Well, it keeps me employed,” but if that were really the reason, I’d be the first to say we shouldn’t teach it!
    So why do we study math? Or more to the geometric point, why do we study the math we study?

  • A deepening divide



    For those pining for a Democratic Party that tries to represent more than the whims of the rich and powerful, these are, to say the least, confusing times.
    On the presidential campaign trail, Hillary Clinton has been promoting standard pro-middle class rhetoric, yet also has been raking in speaking fees from financial firms.
    One of her potential primary challengers, former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley, has been sounding anti-Wall Street themes, but only after finishing up two terms in office that saw his state plow more public pension money into Wall Street firms, costing taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars in financial fees.
    Similarly, in Washington, the anti-Wall Street fervor of those such as Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren sometimes seems as if it is on the ascent — that is, until big money comes calling.
    Indeed, on the very same day Reuters reported on big banks threatening to withhold campaign contributions from Democratic coffers, Democratic lawmakers abruptly coalesced around Charles Schumer as their next U.S. Senate leader.
    CNN captured in a blaring headline how unflinching an ally the New York senator has been to the financial elite: “Wall Street welcomes expected Chuck Schumer promotion.”

  • No new taxes vs. no new debt: The standoff

    Deciding which public works projects to fund, even in a good year, exposes our fault lines — political, rural-urban, and governmental — but it also validates need.
    The whittling for this year’s failed capital outlay (pork) bill was more hard-nosed than usual.
    From the $200 million-plus hog, the governor asked for $60 million in capital outlay: $45 million for roads and $15 million for the economic development closing fund.
    State Bill 159 emerged from the Senate Finance Committee and passed the Senate unanimously. It included $45 million for roads, an attempt to accommodate the governor, and money for local projects of all 42 senators and 33 House Democrats.
    But not House Republicans. This is because the Democratic majority in the Senate, the Republican majority in the House, and the governor couldn’t agree.
    Senate Finance Committee Chairman John Arthur Smith, D-Deming, has said the state is up to its eyeballs in road debt. He refused to approve any more without a new funding source, namely an increase in fuel taxes.
    In committee, some Republicans weren’t opposed, but the governor, positioning herself for the national stage, was adamant.
    No new taxes vs. no new debt. Stalemate. When diplomacy fails, manipulation takes its place.

  • Medicare hospice benefit helps terminally ill patients, families

    Choosing hospice care isn’t about giving up. It’s about making every day count.
    Terminally ill people who make the choice receive care for their physical, emotional, social and spiritual needs. They’re no longer seeking a cure, but they do want to live out their last weeks and months as comfortably as possible and with dignity.
    Unfortunately, many people with Medicare aren’t aware of the hospice benefit.
    Hospice programs follow a team approach. The specially trained team typically includes doctors, nurses, counselors and social workers, among others. A doctor and nurse are on call 24-7 to care for you and support your family when you need it.
    The hospice benefit allows you and your family to stay together in the comfort of your home, unless you require hospital care. If your hospice team determines you need inpatient care at some point, it will make the arrangements for your stay.
    Hospice’s main goal is to relieve your pain and manage your symptoms. As long as the care comes from a Medicare-approved hospice, Medicare covers the physician services, nursing care, drugs, medical equipment and supplies, and physical and occupational therapy.

  • What does N.M. want from an electric power company?

    The debate over PNM’s proposed long-term plan is raising questions that go beyond the plan itself, if New Mexicans are willing to engage in that discussion.
    Though most of the state is served by electric co-ops, PNM’s economic and environmental influence reaches well beyond its service boundaries.
    The Public Regulation Commission must make a decision with far-reaching consequences. Environmental concerns — including the health of New Mexico children — appear to clash with economic objectives, which also affect New Mexico citizens.
    But maybe the clash of objectives is not real. The argument may be broader.
    Three PRC commissioners recently spent more than two hours at a session devoted entirely to public comment about the PNM plan. Under the plan, two of the coal-fired units at the San Juan Generating Station will be shut down.
    The controversy is over what replaces the power from those units. Will it be a mix of coal, nuclear, renewable and natural gas — a plan already agreed to by federal and other state regulators — or, as some New Mexicans demand, will it be changed to scrap the coal and nuclear and rely much more on solar and wind?