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Today's Opinions

  • Arthur Miller at 100

    BY DR. PAUL KENGOR
    Visions and Values

  • Shaking out myths of earthquakes and hydraulic fracturing

    BY MARITA NOON
    Executive Director for Energy Makes America Great

  • Recognizing a concussion needs to be part of training

    During a brutal game with the Aggies, UNM football star Clarence Heald suffered a concussion that knocked him cold. He got up and played, semiconscious, to the end of the game, when he took another blow to the head and was unconscious for half an hour.
    It was 1906. UNM’s slogan at the time: “Do or die.”
    Today, we know that young Clarence probably paid for those injuries the rest of his life with dizziness, slurred speech, difficulty focusing or depression, among other things.
    We’ve learned a lot about brain injuries and sports in New Mexico.
    UNM’s Brain Safe Project, which began in 2013, uses MRIs (magnetic resonance imaging) taken over time to study the long-term effects of brain concussions on student athletes. By 2014, it had the world’s largest database of student athletes and concussions. Some of its subjects had already looked at the images, decided not to press their luck, and stopped playing.
    State law prescribes brain-injury protocols for school sports, including training for coaches, and the New Mexico Activities Association provides clear information about concussions to parents and students on its website.
    So we’re more aware and better informed, but we’re not quite there yet.

  • Vision for administration appears at ACI meeting

    Something like a vision has crept from the technocratic veneer of the Martinez administration. This is not the grand morally uplifting poetry preferred here. But it will have to do, given that the administration’s big picture, so far as I have figured it out, has been the major and appropriate crusade with public education and tinkering at the edges of the tax system.
    The environment for the unveiling came courtesy of the Association of Commerce and Industry, which invited Scott Darnell, the governor’s deputy chief of staff, to be the luncheon speaker at ACI’s fall policy summit in Albuquerque. Darnell’s job is policy oversight for a big piece of state government.
    The full disclosure here is that Darnell and I have been close enough neighbors to occupy the same ward table at Republican meetings, back when I attended such things. Then Darnell went to graduate school at Harvard, Martinez became governor and the rest, as they say….

  • Rolling back the tide of government overreach

    BY MARITA NOON
    Executive director for Energy Makes America Great

  • With apologies to Archie

    The year was 1972 and America eagerly sat down to watch the beginning of the third season of “All In The Family.”  After two years of spouting bigoted, sexist and racial epithets, he had won the hearts of our nation.
    How could you not love someone so despicable and close-minded? We laughed at his stupidity. We laughed at his inane philosophies.
    We laughed at what he represented – evolution’s greatest accomplishment of a non-thinking life form.
    The human race.
    The season’s opening episode was particularly funny, mostly because it went off the scale of sanity.
    Archie is invited as “a man on the street” to appear on television and present his views on gun control. As usual, he goes off on a ridiculous rant, embarrassing his family by suggesting that skyjackings could be prevented by arming all the passengers. No need to search for firearms ... just hand them out at the gate! If everyone is packing, no one would dare pull out a rod and try anything!
    It was funny, hilarious, to even think that anyone with a brain connected to their mouth would suggest that arming people would eliminate the possibility of a crime.
    Well, we have to apologize to Archie.  His ideas on domestic peace were visionary.

  • Letter to the editor 10-14-15

    Putin It To Obama

    President Vladimir Putin just put it to President Barack Obama concerning the situation in Syria.
    They had a discussion about military involvement in Syria, and Putin convinced Obama the Russian air units in Syria would help with attacks on ISIL. However, Putin never considered attacking ISIL because his military forces are in Syria to bolster the Assad regime, and therefore they are bombing the U.S. backed anti-Assad rebels; and Russian ground forces are attacking the anti-Assad forces.
    The U.S. supplies the moderate anti-Assad rebels with arms and then the Russians bomb them and their equipment. The arms suppliers in the U.S. and Russia have to be laughing all the way to the banks.
    Once again, President Obama has placed the national security of the U.S. in jeopardy in order to placate another country. This subservience syndrome will embolden our potential adversaries in the world to test our military posture.
    Donald A. Moskowitz
    Londonderry, NH

  • End-of-life decisions should begin at the kitchen table

    My son and I just had The Discussion. Not the one about the birds and the bees, or the car keys (his or mine). No, this is the one where I told him plainly that I did not want to be a lump of meat being kept alive by machines. Pull the plug, I said.
    This was an easier conversation to have because I’m not expecting to check out any time soon and because he’s finishing his residency as an emergency physician.
    “I’ve seen a lot of people die,” he said, “and it’s never like you see it on TV.”
    It’s a discussion I wish we’d had with my dad. He was always so healthy it was a shock when he suddenly contracted an irreversible disease. The only thing passing for instructions was his occasional joke: “When the time comes, just screw me in the ground.”
    So the time came, and we found ourselves in a hospital meeting room absolutely unprepared for the most excruciating decision any of us had ever made. I wanted to spare my next of kin that anguish.