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Today's Opinions

  • Letters to the Editor 4-30-17

    LANL, LANS’s reason for nixing daycare is puzzling

    Dear Editor,
    At a recent annual presentation to community leaders in Santa Fe by the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the National Nuclear Security, Administration (U.S. Department of Energy), a participant asked if LANL could offer child care for its employees. 
    The response from both Laboratory Director Charlie McMillan and Kim Davis Lebak of DOE/NNSA was “no” for liability reasons.
    The National Laboratory that developed the first nuclear weapon in the history of mankind is concerned about the liability of a child care center. 
    Think about it.
    Jack Sullivan
    Los Alamos

    Have open mind for Rec Bond vote

    Dear Editor,
    Please read, and please have an open mind. Our family always says, options are always better than no options!
    Even if you don¹t care, or don’t like it, consider “voting yes” to the upcoming rec bond. There are many families in Los Alamos that do want these recreational facilities.
    We should support that desire and the excitement that it is generating. When the seniors needed money for improving the senior center, many of us voted “yes.” How does that benefit me? I’m not a senior.

  • Congress should ensure broadband can’t pick winners and losers online

    This editorial appeared in The Los Angeles Times April 19.

    Under its last chairman, Democrat Tom Wheeler, the Federal Communications Commission dramatically ramped up its regulation of telecommunications companies, especially those that provide broadband Internet access to the home. The commission adopted rules to preserve net neutrality, limit the collection and use of data about where people go online and subsidize broadband access services, while also slapping conditions on or flat-out opposing mergers between major broadband companies.
    Although the telecom industry resisted many of these steps as heavy handed and overly restrictive, Internet users, consumer groups and scores of companies that offer content, apps and services online welcomed them as prudent limits on broadband providers who face too little competition. And they’re right about that – far too many consumers today have only one or two practical options for high-speed Internet access at their homes today.

  • Government should tighten belt, not raise taxes

    BY REP. RICK LITTLE
    New Mexico House of Representatives, R-Doña Ana and Otero Counties

  • Government should tighten belt, not raise taxes

    BY REP. RICK LITTLE
    New Mexico House of Representatives, R-Doña Ana and Otero Counties

  • The consequences of Susana Martinez’s decision to destroy higher education

    A few weeks ago, Susana Martinez vetoed funding for every state college and university. All of it.

    Since then, neither she nor House Republican leaders have proposed a plan to restore it. Because every public school relies on New Mexico for 30 percent-50 percent of their budgets, if not changed this decision will annihilate them.

    What does this mean for you? Plenty.Without funding, schools will either completely shut down or offer dramatically less education for much higher tuition; meaning many of our kids will have to go away for university. We will then have a less educated workforce, like engineers to design our roads, accountants for our businesses, and doctors to take care of us when we are sick.

    Furthermore, two-year schools provide technical programs for well-paid, steady careers like commercial truck drivers, welders, and X-ray techs. Those, as well as specialized classes for wind energy at Mesalands Community College in Tucumcari and aviation maintenance at ENMU-Roswell, could disappear.

    And does your child participate in a high school dual-credit course? Those are probably gone.

    The governor’s veto will obliterate jobs. Businesses start and grow where they can find people educated in areas like the ones described above; so they won’t start or grow here when those programs vanish.

  • Letters to the Editor 4-21-17

    The cautionary tale of the golf course

    When the county’s consultants asked which recreation projects were most favored, golf course work was just about last on the list. Yet it gets a $4.5 million piece of the bond pie.
    Why? “Because,” as Mallory so nicely put it, “it’s there.”
    So much has been invested that it’s nearly unthinkable to do anything other than maintain and upgrade the course, even though most taxpayers either don’t care or actively wish it were gone. They’d probably be annoyed to learn it costs the county about half a million dollars a year out-of-pocket just to keep it going. The proposed rec center will be about as expensive, not including the cost of construction.
    The real rule is: if you build it, you will pay. And pay. The bond alone will last long enough that many of your kids will get to pay off some of it, but the maintenance and upgrades will be the gift that keeps on giving, long enough for their kids to ante up too.
    But by then, some other sports facility will be the hot ticket. Enthusiasm for new toys can fade fast, but the credit card bill doesn’t care.
    David North
    Los Alamos

    Thank you, Los Alamos!

  • Letter to the Editor 4-14-17

    Council needs to hear from public about sheriff’s budget

    Sheriff Marco Lucero was elected in 2010 and re-elected in 2014 by stressing the importance of the sheriff’s role in Los Alamos. Majorities on County Councils, not including myself, have worked against this, drastically cutting his budget and ultimately calling an election last November to eliminate the office of sheriff. Our citizens disagreed, and voted to keep an elected sheriff.
    Lucero will present a proposal at next week’s budget hearings to restore his office’s budget. I support returning the duties that have traditionally been done by the Los Alamos sheriff: process and writ serving, sex offenders tracking, transportation of prisoners and court security. Because most of these duties have recently been done by police officers (often on overtime) or contracted personnel, a full-time deputy sheriff (trained and certified by the New Mexico law enforcement academy) could do them more efficiently.  Transfer of these duties would not increase the overall budget, since we are already spending the money for them in other departments.

  • Continuous improvement helps Belen manufacturer go global

    Sisneros Brothers Manufacturing embodies the entrepreneurial notion that finding the right niche can transform talent into business success.
    Avenicio Sisneros, founder of the Belen company, began as a cabinetmaker in the 1950s but shifted to making and installing sheet metal ducting for houses in 1987. With him were sons Martin, Alex and Philip.
    Demand quickly grew beyond the residential market, and the company began manufacturing and installing ductwork for larger commercial customers. By 1990, Sisneros Brothers abandoned installation altogether to focus on manufacturing custom sheet metal ductwork for a wide variety of customers.
    In 2001, the Sisneros leadership team consulted the New Mexico Manufacturing Extension Partnership (NM MEP) to get ideas about streamlining production and eliminating inefficiencies. The nonprofit organization helps businesses increase profitability and competitiveness, transforming them into lean and efficient engines of growth.
    The results of NM MEP-inspired changes impressed company principals, and Sisneros Brothers returned to NM MEP a decade later when CEO Martin Sisneros decided it was time to grow and diversify the customer base.