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Today's Opinions

  • Coming to terms: Document spells out investor, owner relationships

     

    An entrepreneur who’s ready to let investors contribute equity to her promising venture needs to shape an agreement that allows others to share in the rewards, but lets her retain significant control over her creation. 

    The rough draft of that agreement is called a term sheet. It’s essentially the template for the legal contract that ultimately spells out the responsibilities and relationships of business partners.

    Commonly used by professionals during pre-investment negotiations, a term sheet can also be used by small-business owners to discuss terms with investors, including friends and family members. The document aims to protect the interests of all parties to the deal and prevent the disputes that can destroy personal and professional relationships if things don’t work out as expected.

  • Letter to the editor 04-20-14

     

    Questions about school board

    It felt ironic sitting between two beautiful public school principals while facing four male school board members at the recent board meeting on tax-deadline Tuesday (April 15). The fact that the only female board member and board president was not present that evening made the irony mysterious.

    Two days later, when I read the Los Alamos Monitor headline “Schmidt’s contract OK’d”, I felt the irony deepen. If Dr. Eugene Schmidt would agree to stay beyond that year, I would urge the board to abandon its search for a new superintendent, since it would be foolish to lose such a man with his qualities and capability. 

    Allow me to explain.

  • Easter-themed pets can be a huge responsibility

    From the abundance of chocolate candies lining the grocery store aisles to the colorful dresses hung in the children’s departments at the mall, there are many joyous symbols associated with the Easter holiday.
    Two very popular symbols, both irresistibly adorable and covered in fluff, are a chick or bunny on Easter morning. While giving these as gifts may seem like fun ways to celebrate the holiday at the time, it is important to remember that they are still long-term commitments that come with a lot of responsibility.
    Are you prepared to take on the challenge of caring for your little Easter fur ball once the holiday passes?
    Baby chicks are available for purchase at most any feed supply store for the low price of $1 for 3. Because of their easy availability and low initial cost, chicks are often impulse Easter purchases that people make without taking into consideration their present and future care requirements. As with all other pets, they too will soon outgrow their cute, baby-like phase.
    “An impulse pet is always a bad purchase,” said Dr. Mark Stickney, clinical associate professor at the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. “It may look cute in the store, but Easter is gone in a day and then you have an animal to take care of long term.”

  • Some lines just can't be crossed

    A few weeks back, there was some discussion in the paper about the N-word.
    Earlier this year, the NFL began formal discussions on whether the N-word should be banned, and if so what penalty should be levied against a player for using it.
    African-American Richard Sherman, football cornerback for the Seattle Seahawks, thinks banning the N-word is in itself racist. He noted, “It’s weird they’re targeting one specific word. Why wouldn’t all curse words be banned then?”
    Sherman added that when spoken by an African-American and pronounced ending in “-a”, it is not racist.  In fact, in that situation, it’s considered a term of endearment.
    Term of endearment?  Harry Carlson, another African American NFL player, but from a generation prior, disagrees. He challenged younger players who use the “-a” version to “go visit your grandfather and use it on him. See how endeared he feels!”

  • N.M. needs new ideas for job growth

    Prompted by a large decline in federal spending, New Mexicans are now engaged in a healthy and useful dialogue about how best to diversify our economy.
    Think New Mexico would like to offer two ideas that we believe could propel private sector job growth in our state — and that gubernatorial and legislative candidates from both parties should be able to embrace.
    Both ideas were advanced in Think New Mexico’s 2013 policy report, Addressing the Jobs Crisis. The first would establish a post-performance incentive that would reward companies only after they create high-paying jobs or make major capital investments. It is designed to encourage existing business to expand in New Mexico and new businesses to relocate to the state.
    Six years ago, Utah, which now ranks second in the nation for job growth, became the first state to move to an economic development strategy based on post-performance incentives.
    Utah’s post-performance incentive has led to the creation of 25,546 high-paying jobs from blue chip companies like Boeing, eBay and Proctor and Gamble. That is in addition to $5.16 billion in new capital investment and $1.62 billion in new state revenues since the incentive was established in 2008. (Several weeks ago Idaho became the second state to enact this sort of post- performance incentive).

  • Opinion: Justice still awaits family of woman slain by cop

    Just off the heels of the Albuquerque Police Department’s evaluations by the Department of Justice, the family of a woman, who was a victim of a state police officer’s excessive violence, rallied together April 11 in to get justice for a life that was cut short.
    Jeanette Anaya, 39, was driving along a Santa Fe street Nov. 7, when State Police Officer Oliver Wilson attempted to stop her for making a “wobbly” right turn. Anaya did not stop and Wilson gave pursuit. Dashboard camera show the pursuit and the police car slam into Anaya’s vehicle. Wilson then got out of his cruiser, ran along side of Anaya’s vehicle and fired 16 shots — two of them killing Anaya. There are conflicting stories on whether the passenger in Anaya’s car was injured, at least physically.
    I knew Jeanette and her family well. From what it seems to me is, she panicked for whatever reason and fled in the direction of her home. When the officer hit her car, the camera shows (at least to me) that she is still trying to get away, not run the cop over as he said.

  • Transparency: Easy to say, harder to do

    Transparency is hard. Just ask the governor, who is now learning, as her predecessors did, that one of the sacrifices of her job is privacy.
    In the latest skirmish of the transparency wars, Gov. Susana Martinez called out a Democratic lawmaker for using a legislative agency to dig dirt on a political opponent.
    Some perspective: The Slurpy hit the fan last month after the governor tried to restrict the Legislature’s two biggest watchdogs, the Legislative Finance Committee and the Legislative Education Study Committee, by requiring them to go through her chief of staff for information. A torrent of criticism from the media and both parties forced the governor to uncuff the committees.
    This happened just after Sunshine Week, a media event that reminds elected officials to keep their cards on the table and their decisions out in the open.
    Coverage of this controversy was interesting. The Albuquerque Journal, which has been so blatantly pro-Martinez as to sacrifice its credibility, blasted the administration for this move. Even red-county newspapers have noted the long fall from grace of the governor who campaigned on transparency. (To be fair, the Legislature has its own transparency blind spots, but that’s another column.)
    We’re seeing more public records challenges.

  • Reining in all prom expenses

    If you’ve got teenagers, you already know how expensive high school can be. Besides food, clothing and school supplies, a whole host of extracurricular activities are competing for a share of your wallet — even as you frantically try to save for college and your own retirement.
    One of the biggest expenses you’ll encounter is prom. Gone are the days of borrowing dad’s suit and crepe paper streamers in the school gym: Today’s proms are often more like a Hollywood premiere with limousines, designer gowns and swanky after-parties.
    I’m not kidding. According to a recent nationwide survey conducted by Visa Inc., the average U.S. family with a high school student attending the prom expects to spend $978 this year. Surprisingly, that’s down 14 percent from last year’s survey average of $1,139 per family.
    A few other interesting statistics the survey uncovered:
    • On average, parents plan to pay for about 56 percent of prom costs, with their kids picking up the remaining 44 percent.
    • Parents in lower income brackets (less than $50,000 a year) plan to spend an average of $733 — a considerable share of the family budget. Thankfully, that’s down significantly from last year’s $1,245 estimate.