.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Letter to the Editor 3-30-16

    No straight answers with roundabout project

  • Letter to the editor 3-23-16

    Looking for New Mexico information

    Dear people of the great state of New Mexico:
    Hello! I am a fourth grade student in North Carolina. In fourth grade, we do state reports and I have chosen your state! I am very excited to learn about the great state of New Mexico as I work on my report.
    Most of the information that we get for our reports will be from books and web sites. We also like to get information from people who live in the state, too. This is why I am writing to you. I was hoping that you would be willing to send me some items to help me learn more about the best things in your state. It could be things like postcards, maps, pictures, souvenirs, general information, this newspaper article, or any other items that would be useful. You can mail items to the address below. I really appreciate your help!
    Jimmy Maple
    Mrs. Hughey’s Class
    Charlotte Latin School
    9502 Providence Road
    Charlotte, NC  28277

  • Letters to the Editor 3-16-16

    Reopening of roundabout discussion would cause delays, cost money

    I was very disappointed to see at the recent Transportation Board meeting the re-opening of the NM 502 Roundabout discussion. This issue has been going on for a few years and has had a full and complete public input during that time and was considered in public meetings of the full Transportation Board and approved by the full County Council.
    The design approved was done by a major traffic-engineering firm (Ourston Engineering) and has been approved by New Mexico State Highway engineers. This design (in my humble opinion as a citizen and taxpayer) is a big improvement for NM 502 and is now funded with state and county funds. This decision has been already made and with full public input. The reopening of this discussion now is entirely unwarranted and way too much time was allowed in the recent Transportation Board meeting to roundabout opponents in promoting their views.  
    I think I would trust the professional opinions from New Mexico State Traffic professional engineers and the consulting firm, Ourston Engineering, so I have no comments on the design, which is being finalized now by the state highway department.

  • Letters to the Editor 3-13-16

    P&Z Commission invites public to Comprehensive Plan review

    During this past week, press releases, news articles, thousands of post cards, radio interview and print, electronic and radio ads have announced public meetings on Monday, Wednesday and Saturday to begin the process of public input in the coming update of the County Comprehensive Plan.
    I would like to take this opportunity to describe the function of the Comprehensive Plan in straightforward terms and invite the community to be an active part in the decision making process. Simply put, the Comprehensive Plan lays out the county’s policy and plans for land use decisions in both the Los Alamos Townsite and White Rock for the next five, 10, even 20 years.
    The current Comprehensive Plan elements are disjointed, significant portions of which were adopted in 1987. The County Charter requires and current needs demand that the Comprehensive Plan be updated to reflect current realities and provide better and more transparent guidance.

  • Letters to the Editor 3-9-16

    Round and round
    we go?

    Would you consent to costly, painful surgery that might or might not improve your health and could result in increased blockage of one of your major arteries?
    The wheels of transportation progress have turned and we’re now faced with the prospect of having our very own two-lane roundabout (RDB) built on Trinity Drive (NM 502) at Central Avenue, beginning in the Spring of 2017.
    Over the past 20 years or so, roundabout proponents have generated three large proposals. The most recent grand plan, in 2011, proposed reducing Trinity to two lanes and installing nine roundabouts. A $300K transportation study was performed by MIG, Inc., a roundabout engineering firm. After review of the study by several concerned county residents, the County Council obtained a second professional opinion that confirmed the citizens’ review: the proposed scheme would not operate as claimed by MIG, but would create a traffic nightmare. (More historical and technical details are available at wcmead.org.)

  • Letters to the Editor 2-19-16

    LA County owes Marquez debt of gratitude

    Richard Marquez recently left the Los Alamos National Laboratory after working there for over 10 years. Most people do not know that before working at LANL, he worked as a Department of Energy official in the Albuquerque office. During his tenure there, he provided significant assistance to Los Alamos County.
    Los Alamos County borrowed over $110 million to finance their hydroelectric facilities and other projects. After the bonds were issued, the market changed and it was to the county’s advantage to refinance those bonds. By doing so, they could save thousands of dollars per year. The transaction was held up in a disagreement on how to split the savings between DOE and the county. The county was in danger of missing the window of opportunity to refinance the bonds because of this disagreement. Richard stepped in and said that this was ridiculous. The DOE and the county are arguing over hundreds of dollars when thousands of dollars could be saved. He took an active part in the further negotiations with the county and hammered out a compromise that was fair.

  • Letter to the editor 2-12-16

    Bartlit unaware of LANL’s various contributions

    As usual, John Bartlit’s Sunday column on Structural Health Monitoring is wise, insightful and informative.
    But it is somewhat startling that he was unaware of SHM, as Los Alamos National Laboratory has been a significant contributor both in applying techniques, such as frequency response (sound spectra) measurements for both validating parts (such as castings) and in situ monitoring (such as metal beam bridges) for corrosion or stress accumulation leading to cracking.
    LANL has also contributed to designs for such monitors that can be powered and report without grid connections (reducing costs and enhancing remote sensing capabilities).
    While Lab publications can be painfully self-congratulatory, they are worth at least skimming for the many technological developments carried out here that they report regularly.
    Terry Goldman
    Los Alamos

  • Ted and Trump take different tracks on ethanol debate

    BY MARITA NOON
    Executive Director, Energy Makes America Great, Inc.