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Today's Opinions

  • Thanks for an enjoyable Chalk Walk

    The Los Alamos Arts Council hosted the fifth annual Sec Sandoval Chalk Walk last Saturday. It was a beautiful day and the Ashley Pond sidewalk was bustling with artists of all ages expressing their creativity and having an enjoyable time. Thank you to those who helped to make the event interesting and fun. We were a part of the Los Alamos ScienceFest and enjoyed all of the activity provided by the nearby booths. Ashley Pond was definitely the place to be.
    Special thanks goes to Sec Sandoval who attended the event and talked with some of the budding artists about their artistic efforts. We look forward to seeing him each year.
    Thank you to those local businesses that provided prizes for the different categories: Village Arts, Reel Deal Theater, Metzger’s and Starbucks Coffee.
    A huge thank you goes to LANB who sponsored the 3D chalk artist from We Talk Chalk in Los Angeles who created a special 3D drawing for our community. Bank representatives were busy all day taking pictures of people with the special effect. This coverage of the event was much appreciated. As always, the Los Alamos Arts Council appreciates your support of our community events. Everyone really enjoyed this addition to the Chalk Walk.

  • LAHS homecoming parade will go on

    In spite of the closed street and construction project, the county has agreed to allow the Los Alamos High School Homecoming Parade to proceed from 4th Street on Central Avenue all the way to Canyon Road and then to Sullivan Field.
    LAC will have the barricades pulled back so that the parade will have use of the direct and traditional parade route. Those barricades will be replaced immediately after the parade passes and Central is still closed to all other vehicle traffic from 15th to 20th Streets.
    We are excited to showcase our community to returning classmates and are grateful to Mike Johnson, Debbie Garcia and LAHS, the Holiday Inn Express, The Lodge, Ashley Pond, Urban Park and Los Alamos County Staff, Los Alamos Public School Foundation, Georgia Strickfaden of Buffalo Tours, the LA History and Bradbury Science Museum, Valles Caldera National Preserve, the Los Alamos Golf Course, Rick Nebel, Mike Luna, Armando Jaramillo, Bobby Chacon, KRSN, the Los Alamos Monitor, Rio Grande Sun, The Santa Fe New Mexican, Betty Ehart Senior Center, Smith’s Marketplace, Sue Dummer and Manhattan Project, Red Barn Screen Prints, LA Chamber of Commerce, Auto Zone and all the wonderful individuals, businesses and groups in the northern New Mexico region that are helping, and have helped, us make this event (Sept. 19, 20 and 21) a great success.

  • Latinas: King doesn't need to apologize for 'heart' remark

    It’s the gaffe that wasn’t.
    The latest tussle between gubernatorial candidates is over Democrat Gary King’s paraphrase of a statement by labor activist Dolores Huerta, a New Mexican from Dawson and compatriot of Cesar Chavez.
    At a fundraiser, King quoted Huerta as saying that “you can’t just go out there and vote for somebody for governor because they have a Latino surname. She said you have to look at them and find out if they have a Latino heart. And we know that Susana Martinez does not have a Latino heart.”
    The governor’s campaign pounced on what appeared to be a gaffe. Lt. Gov. John Sanchez even demanded an apology, which is gallant of him considering that the governor treats him like an insect.
    Then Sen. Linda Lopez, an Albuquerque Democrat and King’s former opponent, called a press conference with women who had something to say about Latina hearts.
    “I attended the Voices for Children conference as a candidate for governor,” Lopez told me. “She (Huerta) actually said the governor doesn’t have a Latina heart. It resonated with so many people.”
    Lopez also heard King’s statement. “He has nothing to apologize for.”

  • From the bottom up

    This just in: According to the American College of Emergency Physicians, New Mexico ranks 50th among the states when it comes to residents’ access to emergency room service.
    The problem many New Mexicans have in digesting news of this sort is that it is just more of the same. In virtually every category some outfit comes up with for purposes of ranking the states — income, jobs and job opportunities, literacy, child well-being and safety, roads and infrastructure, you name it — New Mexico is always at or near the blasted bottom.
    New Mexicans are no longer shocked by such news. About all they can do when another batch of dismal rankings comes out these days is yawn when they should up in arms.
    Mad as Hell and not going to take it anymore! Mounting the barricades, waving placards angrily proclaiming “There’s nothing beneath the bottom and we’re falling through.”
    We must demand better from our state officials, particularly in the final weeks of a gubernatorial campaign.

  • Patroling not profiling

    Two weeks ago I was victim of a gas theft in the night at my house in the Western Area.
    When my almost empty tank was re-filled it cost $34. I called the police to report and Jeff Regenold came to take the information. We had a friendly chat, and I said I’d be more careful to lock the car from now on. I asked him to continue the night patrols through town.
    I had to leave the next day on trip to California, and although neighbors are good about picking up my newspapers for me, I know there are bums from out of town who cruise here, looking for open garages and other opportunities for theft.
    I am sorry that the Los Alamos Monitor delivery lady felt racially profiled when a police car followed her as she was delivering papers on North Mesa. I hope he explained and apologized. The police are trying to keep us safe. Her experience recalled an incident that happened many years ago to a friend of mine who had recently moved here.
    When she arrived from Albuquerque after midnight, she noticed a patrol car following her. She drove slowly, going all over town, including Barranca Mesa. When she finally stopped, the officer asked what she was looking for. She said, “Just seeing how far I could lead you all over town.” They both laughed and after he explained, she thanked him for keeping the night watch.

  • No political ties at homecoming

    The Los Alamos homecoming parade is coming up. In order not to politicize a beloved community tradition, our local parties have decided not to participate.
    We have also asked our candidates not to have entries (as candidates) in the parade.
    You’ll see plenty of our local candidates talking to people during the parade and some will probably participate in their other roles as active community members.
    While our two political parties don’t always agree on issues, we can agree that Los Alamos is a great community. Both the local Democratic Party and Republican Party want Los Alamos High School students to enjoy their weekend without political signs and overt campaigning in their parade.
    Robyn Schultz, Chair
    Democratic Party of Los Alamos County
    Robert Gibson, Chair
    Republican Party of Los Alamos County
     

  • Remember American family members who have passed away

    Sibling relationships stay. Even if the relationship becomes troubled, it is still there. Counting the siblings and spouses of my mom and dad, there were 14. They are all gone now.
    I think my dad, also named Harold Morgan and born in 1917, was the oldest. The last of the group died a few weeks ago. These people were the family adults when I was a kid. The realization of their passing came a few years ago in a comment from a cousin from my generation after the death of her mother, father and stepfather.
    “Wow,” she said. “I’m the oldest.” Being the oldest is new for us Baby Boomers.
    Though they were not especially diverse by today’s quota-driven, politically correct standards, the story of these 14 is one of the millions of American family stories. I share a little here because they are gone.
    Oklahoma City was home to nearly all the 14. Tulsa was involved. One husband, born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, came in as the result of a wartime romance.

  • What the MVD has been doing to improve customer satisfaction

    New Mexicans rightfully demand that the Motor Vehicle Division provide fast, easy and reliable service in a customer-friendly environment at all of our offices.
    Gov. Susana Martinez also directed that we turn things around at the MVD in a reasonable amount of time and meet public expectations for operating more efficiently.
    Here’s what we’re doing to make that happen.
    Over the past 18 months, we’ve cut our wait times in MVD offices and at our call center. A majority of our offices now have average wait times of 15 minutes or less — the lowest in years. The average hold time in our call center is now less than four minutes.
    MVD is doing a better job listening and learning from our customers. We recently implemented the country’s first motor vehicle customer satisfaction capture system in most of our offices.
    At the end of each transaction, you can press a button, which tells us how well we’ve met your needs. By empowering our managers to address customer issues right when they occur, service-related complaints have dropped dramatically.
    Since we launched this system last year, more than 800,000 New Mexicans have provided customer feedback. More than 98 percent of MVD customers now rate our service as “good” or “excellent” — every office, every week.