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Today's Opinions

  • Letter to the Editor 12-9-15

    Radical Islamic terrorism threat to world peace

    The greatest threat to world peace is radical Islamic terrorism.
    Radical Islamic terrorists killed 14 Americans in San Bernardino, California; 130 people in Paris; five military personnel in Chatanooga, Tennesee, and 13 soldiers in Fort Hood, Texas; a soldier in Canada; beheaded journalists and aid workers in the Middle East; killed non-Muslims in Copenhagen, Paris and Tunisia; attacked the Jewish Museum in Brussels, a mall in Kenya, Iraqi Christians, Syrian Christians, 40 churches in Egypt, our embassy in Benghazi, and the Boston Marathon.
    Thousands of attacks by Islamic terrorists have occurred against non-Muslims, and many thousands have been killed. For attacks since 1990 see wikipedia.org   and enter list of Islamic terrorist attacks.
    Islamic terrorists wantonly attack and kill non-Muslims whom they consider infidels.
    We have to destroy the Islamic terrorists, deport sympathizers and restrict entry to the U.S. of people prone to conduct Islamic terrorism.
    Donald Moskowitz
    Londonderry, NH

  • Polling presidential campaign Pinocchios

    My local daily newspaper does relatively little by way of covering the presidential primary campaigns currently under way back in places like New Hampshire, South Carolina and Iowa, so last week I checked online for some updates.
    It was quite informative.
    The night before, I had heard on national television that prominent Republican movers and shakers are increasingly worried by the prospect that billionaire real estate mogul Donald Trump seems to have a sizeable lead in the race for their nomination.
    It is still almost a year before any Republican primary voters in any states can cast their ballots on the issue, and, in politics, a lot can happen in the course of a year. Nonetheless, reports have it that Republican Party insiders think they would lose the 2016 election if Trump were at the top of their ticket.
    Too divisive, they say. Arrogant. A bully. He’s already alienated whole blocs of voters and now he’s even intimated that CNN should pay him $5 million simply to appear alongside the other candidates at the next GOP debate.
    There could well be something to those concerns. Trump does come across as boorish at times. He stretches the truth, makes things up, like that yarn about watching whole crowds of Muslims cheering in New Jersey when the twin towers crashed to the ground on 9/11.

  • Bernalillo County summits develop entrepreneurship

    By Finance New Mexico

  • Disregard fear to find true human potential

    BY BOB FUSELIER
    Special to the Monitor

  • Public forums battle diversity

    “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was....”
    These famously taut lines gain new currency from time to time. Now is such a time.
    Our land is besieged with cross fire of two words, “conservative” and “liberal.” With all said, they impute every vice borne in humans. The flaws are not confined to fiscal blunders.
    All camps deploy the blunted bywords to attack everything from choices of foods and poster phrases to word meanings themselves. “Liar, liar” is the prevailing counter point.   
    Would such deeds make more sense viewed differently? A thought or two can be drawn from “ecology.” As a framework for people, consider an ecosystem.     
    An ecosystem is made stronger by diversity, which works to stabilize and sustain the whole. Species eat different foods. Species find food and water in different ways. Species move differently and face different risks and ailments.
    Environmental conditions at every level constantly change. To meet change, diversity increases the chance of life forms able to adapt and thrive.

  • Work comp news is good, sort of

    From an economic development perspective, the news on workers’ compensation is pretty good. But workers’ compensation is never quite that simple.
    The National Council on Compensation Insurance, NCCI, presented its annual smorgasbord of statistics recently to a group of workers’ comp policy wonks. Costs are down, and rates in the voluntary market will go down in 2016.
    Like most statistical statements about workers’ comp, the statement above is infuriatingly incomplete until explained. The reduction of 6.2 percent is not a cut in anybody’s insurance premium but rather a decrease in the loss costs upon which premiums are based. Insurance carriers will use this information in setting their premium rates. The voluntary market refers only to conventional insurance companies – not to the large segment of the market covered by individual or group self-insurance programs, or to the Assigned Risk Pool.
    This decrease in cost puts New Mexico among the better-performing states. New Mexico’s decrease is bigger than all neighboring states except Texas. This is a selling point for the ever-hopeful industrial recruiters who are forever trying to entice businesses to locate here.

  • Monticello – NM – an unlikely source of balsamic excellence

    Government rescues and economic bailouts abound. But sometimes, which is the case in Monticello, things happen on their own, courtesy of individual initiative.
    Haven’t heard of Monticello or its neighboring hamlet, Placita? Then you neither wander the very rural parts of New Mexico, nor read national publications such as the Wall Street Journal.
    Monticello, once called Cañada Alamosa (Cottonwood Canyon) was settled in 1856 by ranchers and farmers. Even older is Placita, two miles away, established in the 1840s by the Sedillo family, whose descendents still live there. At the other end of the canyon, in 1874, was an Apache agency where Geronimo was once captured. The two communities flourished for a time – Monticello’s population was 573 in 1910 – before they went the way of many rural communities.
    Today, about 50 people live in Monticello. But there is a reason to visit soon, though it is neither the setting nor the loveliness of the village. It is the same attraction that drew the big national paper to the village – organic balsamic vinegar.  

  • Letters to the Editor 12-2-15

    Half agree with House leader McCarthy about terrorists

    I half agree with House Majority Leader McCarthy who is reported by Lederman and Hennessey in Sunday’s Monitor as saying: “It is against the values of our nation and the values of a free society to give terrorists the opening they are looking for.” I only half agree because the terrorists use explosives. If they would only stick to automatic weapons, they would be fully in accord with the values of our nation as a free society.
    Terry Goldman
    Los Alamos

    LA county council
    effort to find new brand seems ridiculous

    The county council’s effort to find a new brand for Los Alamos seems to be  verging on the ridiculous. Thank goodness “Live Exponentially” was shelved.  
    However, the nearly quarter of a million dollars involved in this effort seems like “spending exponentially” to me. Is there no “limit on the horizon” to this expenditure?