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Today's Opinions

  • Letters to the Editor 5-7-17

    Thankful for completed crosswalk project

    Dear Editor,
    As I was walking the loop in White Rock this morning, I was pleasantly surprised to see that the site preparation for the crosswalk I requested at Rover and Bryce has started.
    On June 6, I wrote a letter to Public Works listing all the reasons a crosswalk is needed. A short time later, a Public Works employee stopped by my house and said they agreed with me but site prep would have to be done first.
    It never happened and I knew the reason was no money. I wrote to the County Council on April 10 and asked if they could help. I was called by someone in Public Works and told that they were able to allot $30,000 to the project but it could take up to four months to do it. I told him that was fine but if it wasn’t done in four months I would be presenting the County Council with a petition.
    I want to thank both the County Council and Public Works for the timely response to something which has been needed for years. Public Works should not have to rob Peter to pay Paul for a crosswalk. If the county doesn’t have the money to fund necessary work to our streets and roads, we are in big trouble. It is a lot cheaper to maintain what we have then to build something new.
    Camille Morrison
    Los Alamos

    Cost of Rec Bond is

  • County issues should stir healthy discussion

    My name is Greg White and this series of articles will cover three issues that the County Council hopefully will be discussing and acting on in a positive manner over the next several months. The first I’m sure they will, the next two can head off litigation. The first is a rewrite of the proposed immigrant resolution proposed by Councilor Pete Sheehey. The second is what will the council decide about the sheriff’s office. And the last is the legal status of appointing a county employee to an elected position, namely appointing the county manager as the county treasurer.
    I hope my articles will spur healthy and respectful discussion and encourage people to come to council meetings to make their voices heard, again in a civil and respectful way. Which may be best accomplished by the council changing it’s rules on public comment to allow five minutes per person as it’s hard no matter how concise you try to be to actually convey feelings in three minutes. Three minutes works for boxers, ever try boxing it’s a whole lot more tiring than it looks, but I always find myself running out of comment time about 30 seconds from finishing no matter how much I rehearse.

  • Does more politicking work for the people?

    Governance is like a Shakespeare play in which the two governing parties act out human parts. Shakespeare famously heightens the drama with leading roles that carry the main action, spiced with an occasional ghost who reveals mindsets that drive the action. But today the action seems less important than the interplay of ghosts.
    The main action is the substance of politics – the policies to be evolved, discussed and enacted ... the necessary business of the people, by the people, for the people. A timely example would be rebuilding the middle class.  
    The ghost in the play is the “politicking” – phantom voices that name who let down the middle class. The action is the governance; the mindsets are drivers. Together, a play.
    Yet, almost every scene in today’s play is dominated by politicking – raising and reprising story lines to mythic proportions – to the detriment of real action on the people’s business. More skewing gets done than business. 
    And it gets worse. Although each party clearly seeks different policies, the politicking on each side mirrors the other. It is eerie.       

  • Letter to the Editor 5-5-17

    Life-size sculpture of Russ Gordon proposed

    Dear Editor,
    I just learned that 2017 will be Russ Gordon’s last summer concert series. Like thousands of residents, I have greatly enjoyed Gordon’s Summer Concerts over the past 30 years and for more than a decade, my wife and I have contributed a few hundred dollars each year to Russ’ program. I hope, somehow, that the Summer Concert tradition will be continued indefinitely, but for now, I wish to initiate lasting recognition of the effort Russ has made towards our community’s wellbeing. Russ’ initiative has been truly a ‘Labor of Love’ that will be greatly missed and potentially very difficult to replace.
    I am willing to take the lead on obtaining a life-size sculpture of Russ, somewhat suggested by the photo of Russ shows in the Los Alamos Daily Post’s April 27 issue. Ideally, the sculpture would be ready for dedication at Gordon’s last Ashley Pond concert on Sept. 8.

  • Love the horses but let them starve

    Of all the demonstrations of Americans’ political hypocrisy, what we’ve done about the slaughter of horses is right up there.
    We can thank our governor for a recent example, though she is hardly alone.
    Like other public figures, the governor shed crocodile tears a few years ago during the controversy over the possible opening of a horse slaughterhouse in Roswell. That controversy helped spark a change in federal policy that effectively banned horse slaughter in the United States.
    This year, she pocket vetoed a simple bill that would have saved a few horses. A pocket veto means she simply ignored the bill until the deadline passed.
    The bill, HB 390, said when the state livestock board has custody of a stray horse, licensed rescue organizations should get a chance to buy the horse at a modest fee before the horse is offered at auction. This would allow the rescue to get the horse at a low price rather than having to bid against other unknown buyers, possibly including “killer buyers” who would take the horse to Mexico and sell it for slaughter. The bill passed both houses handily.

  • Avoiding shutdown is not such a bad thing

    The Boston Herald published this editorial Wednesday.

    So either “This is what winning looks like” or “Our country needs a good ‘shutdown’ in September to fix (this) mess!”
    Yes, we’re confused too. In an early morning tweet yesterday President Trump seemed so unhappy with the temporary spending deal struck by congressional Republicans to keep the government up and operating until September that he would risk a shutdown then. But by mid-day he had suddenly decided that it’s a good deal after all and “a clear win for the American people.”
    The $1.1 trillion spending package does include a $15 billion boost in military spending — half of what Trump wanted — but in the greater scheme of things not a bad deal. And it includes $1.5 billion in additional cash for border security — some of it for “fixing” existing portions of the border wall.
    As for all those proposed cuts in domestic spending, well that’s just a big nevermind. The proposed $1.2 billion cut to the National Institutes of Health? NIH got a $2 billion increase. Defunding Planned Parenthood? Nope. The Environmental Protection Agency takes a 1 percent haircut on its $8 billion budget.

  • Hang on to your socks, it’s May

    Can you believe we have arrived at May? As friend of mine use to say, “Hang onto your socks.”

    If you’re the parents of a senior, enjoy every breath taking moment and hold your breath or at least your tongue, when you wonder just for a moment how your senior would forget to do, say or tell you that. 

    You may find a point where you question your parenting because you are pretty sure you taught them this or that, just chalk it up to the old saying, “It’s May.”

    One of the most important things to be aware of is Mental Health Awareness month. It doesn’t matter if we’re talking about someone five, 55 or a 105, try and cut everyone some slack as pressures heat up and tensions never seem to cool down.

    Somehow it will all get done and we think it will slow down, but alas, it won’t, we just like to think it might for a minute or two.

    The 40 Developmental Assets have never been more important for this time of year, this moment in time, this place in history. We have to rally around our community members, our youth and help them build resilience factors or Assets.

  • Letters to Editor

    Road repairs already on track; focus on rec bond

     

    Dear Editor,

    When I hear people saying “roads first” in response to the Rec Bond, I’m sympathetic. I also drive down Trinity and despair at the crumbling curbs. 

    The thing is, Trinity Drive is a state road it’s NM 502, which continues along East Road. Other roads folks are complaining about are state-owned as well: the Truck Route and the whole stretch of NM 4, from the Y through White Rock and out to Bandelier. Rendija Road to the Sportsmen¹s Club is a forest road. 

    If people want these roads fixed, they should appeal to the state, not the county. The Rec Bond has nothing to do with these roads, nor does it have anything to do with eyesores such as Mari-Mac, which is owned by Smith¹s. The county can enforce code violations, but it cannot repair infrastructure it doesn’t own.

    I encourage others to call or email the Public Works department for info on infrastructure. 

    In addition to the above facts, I learned that there¹s a five-year plan to rebuild the few county roads that need it, with an $18.4 million budget already adopted by the County Council.