.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Proudly praising pop

    Backyards are smoking with the embers of charcoals, the air filled with fumes of lighter fluid. Guys are outside wearing aprons saying, “#1 Dad” and “King of the Grill.”
    Burnt toast and uncooked eggs served in bed. An avalanche of ugly ties. Toilet shaped beer mugs. Canned bacon spray. Caveman-feet slippers. SpongeBob golf club head covers.
    Yeah, it’s Father’s Day again. Children all over the world enjoy dedicating a day to their favorite lounge chair burper.
    Papa. Babbo. Tata. Vader. Otac. Banketi. Patri. Buwa. Daa. Patro. Otosan. Pabbi.
    Wherever you are or however you say it, it’s the same in all languages across the world. Hey Dad, can I borrow the keys to the car?
    Here in America, Father’s Day is a time for men do what they do best — set things on fire and tell bad jokes while knocking down a few cold ones. Norman Rockwell images capture the spirit of our country’s dads; fathers carving the Thanksgiving turkeys, guys chewing the fat in a barber’s shop, teaching their son how to catch a baseball.

  • USDA helps millions of rural homebuyers own their future

    Owning your own home is part of the American dream. For 65 years, USDA has helped millions of rural residents achieve the dream of homeownership through our affordable home loan programs. This year, USDA Rural Development has helped nearly 3.4 million rural families and individuals become homebuyers through 65 years of delivering housing assistance.
    Affordable home financing creates ladders of opportunity to help families grow and thrive. Every year, USDA Rural Development’s direct and guaranteed home loans help tens of thousands of rural residents become homeowners.
    Here in New Mexico since the start of the Obama Administration, USDA Rural Development has made direct or guaranteed loans for more than 10,000 rural residents.
    For example, 21-year old Marianna Wheeler of Deming, and her 3-year-old son, Gilbert Ray became two of those 10,000 homeowners after they moved into a new home which was made possible through USDA’s Rural Development Direct Home loan program.
    We also provide a home repair loan program, and grants for very-low-income seniors, to help homeowners protect and preserve their most precious asset.

  • The secret of the soft sell

    No one likes to feel hustled while shopping, whether it’s in a retail store or trade show booth.
    To attract customers without brazen hawking or downright pushiness, businesses need to refine the art of the soft sell. That begins by making the store or trade show booth an intentional destination for people who are truly interested in what the business sells.
    Relationship skills
    While any business would like to sell at least one product to every person who walks in the door, that’s the type of unrealistic goal that can turn sales reps into apex predators.
    A long-term perspective toward potential customers focuses on developing a relationship that lasts longer than one transaction. It lays a foundation through attraction rather than persuasion.
    A retailer might begin with an irresistible offer that draws customers into a store — say, 20 percent off on purchases over $100 or one-day-only sales on a hot-selling product.
    A trade-show vendor might offer freebies to customers in return for contact information. Some vendors create a sense of urgency by offering something of value to the first 20 customers who sign up. A startup financial planner, for example, could offer a 15-minute consultation to the first 15 visitors as a way to build a client base.
    The light touch

  • Op-ed comments not scientifically valid

    Marita Noon’s op-ed in the June 6 Los Alamos Monitor is just one more example of someone hiding their own agenda by labeling themselves as an organization dedicated to educating the public.
    Ms. Noon claims that the EPA hides their use of “bad science” so that they can continue to list species as endangered with the result that farmers, ranchers, and anyone with an interest in extracting anything from the Earth, is prevented from accessing the water and land needed for their enterprise.
    The problem is that her evidence consists only of opinions offered by people representing organizations with no serious scientific credentials, and whose agendas are clearly anti-government in general.
    A Google search on the organizations mentioned in her op-ed, including the American Stewards of Liberty, the Institute for Trade Standards and Sustainable Development (ITSSD), Citizens’ Alliance for Responsible Energy (CARE) and Energy Makes America Great, Inc., quickly reveals that these organizations are intertwined and have an agenda focused on smoothing the pathway for companies to pay little or no attention to the environmental damage left behind as a result of their activities, including contaminated water aquifers and soil.

  • Pawlak has it all wrong

    In May 30 Los Alamos Monitor, Mr. John Pawlak made the following statements in his column about the leader of the NRA and about NRA members:
    “Enter one of the strangest and most annoying grapes, Wayne LaPierre, spokesperson for those who can’t muster enough hatred and stupidity on their own, and so they hire someone to do it for them.”
    “He (Wayne LaPierre) doesn’t have enough of a brain stem to support a headache.”
    “The logic used by LaPierre and his ‘shoot first and ask questions later’ followers is mind numbing.”
    “So, just how moronic can the NRA get?”
    “LaPierre and his card-carrying ditto-heads would say, “The only thing that stops a bad 3-year-old with a gun is a good 1-year-old with a gun!”
    “The more I think about it, the more attractive tongue-chewing sounds to me. Maybe we can get LaPierre and his “I have the right to shoot people” gun-nuts to chew theirs?”
    I am an NRA member, but I don’t harbor hatred and I am not stupid. I don’t shoot first and ask questions later. I am not a moron. I am not a ditto-head. I don’t have the right to shoot people. I am not a gun nut.

  • Doctors warn parents about the impact of media violence on kids

    Back in the day, the Lone Ranger disarmed the bad guy by shooting the gun out of his hand. If anybody got wounded, there was a spot of ketchup on his shirt.
    What’s this got to do with the unrelenting and frightening news stories about violence by kids? More than you might think.
    Lately, a 12-year-old in Roswell who shot two fellow students pleaded no contest. A California youth, frustrated by the failure of beautiful women to notice him, murdered people randomly. And now two girls, under the influence of website fiction, stab another girl.
    We could have another debate about gun laws and gun access, although in part, knives were the weapons of choice.
    What if we turn the debate around and ask what goes on at the front end of these tragedies. Why do some kids think it’s OK to hurt or kill other kids? What’s going on?
    A University of New Mexico pediatrician points straight at media violence.
    Victor Strasburger has appeared on national media to urge his fellow pediatricians to stop worrying whether kids’ car seats face forward or backward and start warning parents about exposure to violence on TV, in movies and in games.

  • Spending set at $6.16 billion for year starting July 1

    If it was easy to measure the impact of state government, we would just look up the planned spending for the budget year starting July 1 (FY 15) and say, through our state government, we spend $2,954 for each New Mexican. But we would overlook the $413 per capita spent on roads. The nearly $396 million appropriated for capital outlay (buildings and things) is separate.
    The per capita figures come from totals discussed in the Legislative Finance Committee’s “2014 Post-Session Review” and dividing by our July 1, 2013, estimated population of 2,085,287. Planned spending means the $6.16 billion of what is called “recurring revenue” appropriated through the general fund, the state’s main pot of money for operations. The road spending is via road fund.
    The state does not plan to spend all its income; estimated “total recurring revenue” will be $6.18 billion with the difference going to reserves, which is good because always there is the question of how much will appear. All the numbers including the current budget year (FY 14, which ends June 30) are estimates; estimates change.

  • Standing corrected

    I stand corrected.
    In a column late last March this reporter opined to the effect that “Front-runners don’t finish last.”
    The impetus for this contention was the dead-last finish New Mexico Attorney General Gary King had posted just a few days earlier at the state Democratic Party’s preprimary convention.
    King’s name recognition with New Mexico voters is considerable, I noted. He has been on statewide ballots no fewer than two times. His family has been prominent in state politics going back to the 1960s. He served in the Legislature with distinction for 12 years.
    What’s more, leading up to this year’s state Democratic convention, he was seen as the logical front-runner for the top spot on the Democratic June primary ballot where his competition consisted of four other Democrats who were little known to the rank and file party voters who would be voting in the June 3 primary.
    On top of all that, no New Mexican who had finished last at his/her party’s state convention had ever gone on to win that party’s primary election contest.
    It seemed inevitable, but I now stand corrected.