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Today's Opinions

  • New online tool helps manufacturers measure up against world-class standards

     

    Manufacturing businesses that want to know how their performance stacks up against industry standards have a new tool to make that measurement — and it’s available at no cost.

    The Manufacturing Performance Institute, in conjunction with the American Small Manufacturers Coalition and the New Mexico Manufacturing Extension Partnership, created the Next Generation Manufacturing Assessment Tool after surveying thousands of United States manufacturers in 2009, 2011 and 2013. 

    The biennial survey asks manufacturers what strategic benchmarks they use to measure their efficiency and effectiveness in six critical areas: human resources, supply-chain management, sustainability, process improvement, innovation and global engagement. The tool based on this survey allows manufacturers of all kinds to see how they compare with world-class industry practices and standards by comparing their responses to those of thousands of other top manufacturers. 

  • Tasks to survive back-to-school

     

    Parents, if this is your first time at the back-to-school rodeo, let me share a few lessons my wife and I have learned the hard way. Chances are you’ll be spending the next few weeks filling out piles of pre-enrollment paperwork, lining up carpools and, of course, taking the dreaded shopping excursions for clothes and school supplies.

    If you’re a first-timer or simply need a back-to-school refresher course, here are a few suggestions that can help you save time, money and sanity:

    Get organized. Maintain a correspondence file from your kid’s school for things like registration requirements, report cards, permission slips, required vaccinations, school policies, teacher and parent contact information, etc. Ask whether the school has a website, online calendar, or email list you can join. Also, create a family master calendar.

  • Celebrate cowboys on Saturday

    Saturday is the fourth annual celebration of National Day of the Cowboy in New Mexico.
    Cowboys have been part of New Mexico history even before it became a state, so it seems very appropriate to honor their past and current contributions. Keeping the western way of life is an important part of our cultural heritage.
    There are 6,800 livestock producing ranches in New Mexico and with the support organizations and services they employ 18,000 people and produce about $2.1 billion in economic activity each year.
    Wear a cowboy hat on Saturday to help recognize and appreciate cowboys and cowgirls. Check out facebook.com/dayofthecowboynewmexico for details on celebrations in northern New Mexico.
    Richard Beal
    Santa Fe 

  • Expression of alternative viewpoints

    I would like to share a dangerous concept known as “groupthink” with the citizens of Los Alamos. I will start out by thanking all of the teachers at Los Alamos High School who helped me develop my reading comprehension and critical thinking skills.
    Recently, I noticed a social media group in Los Alamos, dedicated to fostering hometown businesses in Los Alamos County, was openly promoting “Smith’s Marketplace.” This seemed odd to me because Smith’s Marketplace is a subsidiary of “The Kroger Co.” “The Kroger Co.” is “one of the world’s largest grocery retailers with fiscal sales of $98.4 billion.”
    Upon bringing this fact to the attention of the group, I was quickly dismissed as being a “negative commentator” and involuntarily removed.

  • The 'Walmart effect' on Main Street

    Smith’s Marketplace offers a beautiful place for “one-stop” shopping. Enjoy any meal and a delicious selection of chocolate, ice cream and cake for dessert. Afterwards, shop from an impressive selection of organic foods, clothes, toys, pet supplies, electronics and household goods. Keep people from driving to Santa Fe? How about keep people from driving down to our local restaurants, CB Fox, Metzgers, Pet Pangaea, Radio Shack and the Los Alamos Co-op Market? This will be the “Walmart effect” on Main Street.
    Studies show that when Walmart moves in, small businesses close their doors, unable to compete with big retail’s buying power. Within two years of Walmart’s opening its doors, 82 local stores went out of business. Mom and Pop stores experience a 10 to 40 percent decline in sales after a Walmart opens and businesses within one mile of a Walmart Supercenter have a 25 percent chance of shutting down in the first year, a 40 percent chance by the second year.

  • The 'Walmart effect' on Main Street

    Smith’s Marketplace offers a beautiful place for “one-stop” shopping. Enjoy any meal and a delicious selection of chocolate, ice cream and cake for dessert. Afterwards, shop from an impressive selection of organic foods, clothes, toys, pet supplies, electronics and household goods. Keep people from driving to Santa Fe? How about keep people from driving down to our local restaurants, CB Fox, Metzgers, Pet Pangaea, Radio Shack and the Los Alamos Co-op Market? This will be the “Walmart effect” on Main Street.
    Studies show that when Walmart moves in, small businesses close their doors, unable to compete with big retail’s buying power. Within two years of Walmart’s opening its doors, 82 local stores went out of business. Mom and Pop stores experience a 10 to 40 percent decline in sales after a Walmart opens and businesses within one mile of a Walmart Supercenter have a 25 percent chance of shutting down in the first year, a 40 percent chance by the second year.

  • The 'Walmart effect' on Main Street

    Smith’s Marketplace offers a beautiful place for “one-stop” shopping. Enjoy any meal and a delicious selection of chocolate, ice cream and cake for dessert. Afterwards, shop from an impressive selection of organic foods, clothes, toys, pet supplies, electronics and household goods. Keep people from driving to Santa Fe? How about keep people from driving down to our local restaurants, CB Fox, Metzgers, Pet Pangaea, Radio Shack and the Los Alamos Co-op Market? This will be the “Walmart effect” on Main Street.
    Studies show that when Walmart moves in, small businesses close their doors, unable to compete with big retail’s buying power. Within two years of Walmart’s opening its doors, 82 local stores went out of business. Mom and Pop stores experience a 10 to 40 percent decline in sales after a Walmart opens and businesses within one mile of a Walmart Supercenter have a 25 percent chance of shutting down in the first year, a 40 percent chance by the second year.

  • The 'Walmart effect' on Main Street

    Smith’s Marketplace offers a beautiful place for “one-stop” shopping. Enjoy any meal and a delicious selection of chocolate, ice cream and cake for dessert. Afterwards, shop from an impressive selection of organic foods, clothes, toys, pet supplies, electronics and household goods. Keep people from driving to Santa Fe? How about keep people from driving down to our local restaurants, CB Fox, Metzgers, Pet Pangaea, Radio Shack and the Los Alamos Co-op Market? This will be the “Walmart effect” on Main Street.
    Studies show that when Walmart moves in, small businesses close their doors, unable to compete with big retail’s buying power. Within two years of Walmart’s opening its doors, 82 local stores went out of business. Mom and Pop stores experience a 10 to 40 percent decline in sales after a Walmart opens and businesses within one mile of a Walmart Supercenter have a 25 percent chance of shutting down in the first year, a 40 percent chance by the second year.