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Today's Opinions

  • Letter to the Editor 4-5-17

    Opposed to new White Rock ZIP Code

    I share John Ramsay’s objection to the USPS designation, “White Rock,” as part of my mailing address. (ref: Monitor letter of March 29, 2017) White Rock is not an incorporated city, nor is Los Alamos. Our only local government is that of an H-class county.
    It is entirely resonable to separate areas within the county by ZIP codes to expedite mail delivery, but not to arbitrarily change the name of the destination.
    To suggest that both must be changed to deliver mail to my residence, which hasn’t changed its physical location in 50 years, is ludicrous. For examply, the city where I was born (before ZIP codes were invented) is also called, “LA.”
    By my count, it is now subdivided by the USPS into 214 ZIP codes. One city name, more than 200 ZIP codes, yet the USPS seems able to cope. Why not here?
    Don Hanson
    Los Alamos

  • Letters to the Editor 3-29-17

    County plan to build Splash Pad bad idea

    I just read in the Daily Post that the Los Alamos County Council is considering building a Splash Pad park in White Rock. My initial response was “Boy the county can’t wait to spend our tax dollars on nonsense once again.”
    The worst part of it is that they want to borrow more money to get this project and others done!  It seems to me that we haven’t learned anything from watching our National Government take us, the citizens, into debt that could possibly collapse our economy!  
    Do you realize that the Splash Pad area is a bad idea - let me share the reasons why I think it is.
    It will only be used a maximum of two months out of the year during hot weather. These type of projects are built in Phoenix and other places where they can be utilized several months out of the year.
    The cost of building this park is not worth going into debt for.
    It will be built in White Rock which means it will only serve that community for the most part.
    Once again, as citizens of Los Alamos/White Rock, we will be stuck with subsidizing maintenance, etc.  

  • Letter to the Editor 3-22-17

    Bill 412 is double taxation

    House Bill 412 calls for closing many exemption loopholes to address the budget crisis that our state faces.  No doubt, there are many aspects of the Tax Reform Bill that need just that – reform. However, HB 412 also calls for the eliminating the sales tax exemption for Non-Profits – all Non-Profits large, small, 501c3, churches etc.  Thus subjecting non-profits to Sales and Gross Receipts Tax.
    Under HB 412, Non-Profits would need to collect and pay GRT on all contracts (local, state, federal), grants from foundations and United Way, fees from programs, classes and services. Most non-profits are local, community-oriented, and are responding to community needs. Many exist on grants and contacts to provide services that government is not.
    This has the potential to be disastrous for non-profits, and I have a front row seat in that regard, as a volunteer sitting on the board of The Family YMCA.

  • Letters to the Editor 3-12-17

    Family thanks community for love and support

    Ida S. Pacheco and her family want to thank you for the kind and encouraging words, beautiful flowers, lovely cards, thoughts, prayers and masses. All that you shared to console our hearts in the loss of Raymond David Pacheco, have comforted and sustained us. Thank you most sincerely for your generous support and sympathy.
    The Pacheco Family
    Los Alamos

    Much to be thankful for
    living in Los Alamos

    We have always loved living in Los Alamos. The views are beautiful and what other small town has enjoyed a Joshua Bell concert? But there are other reasons that make it nice to live here even when it is not a good day.

  • Some administrative savings work better than others

    If I were planning to run for the Legislature, my list of priorities would look a little different from those you usually see. Instead of reciting the usual passionate platitudes about education and economic development, I would talk about saving taxpayer money while improving the performance of government agencies by means of methodical administrative reforms.
    Don’t worry, I’m not running, but I have been repeatedly frustrated that I’ve never seen a single campaign promise along these lines. Every now and then when a candidate has knocked on my door, literature in hand, I’ve invited the candidate in and talked about this. It doesn’t do any good. Administrative reform is tedious and unglamorous, is poorly understood by the public, and most of the time it doesn’t produce any bragging rights.
    It should especially be a focus of attention for governors and candidates for governor. Just now, with the state’s desperate need to save money, the governor is trying some things that may or may not produce results.
    Gov. Susana Martinez announced a few weeks ago that she was considering consolidating departments, but the idea disappeared down a black hole pretty quickly. That is probably because of the pummeling her staff must have taken from irate constituents the minute this thought was expressed.

  • Pinball parts maker gets boost from makeover

    BY CLAUDIA INFANTE
    New Mexico Manufacturing Extension Partnership

  • Bill tackles a stubborn problem in trying to curb truancy

    Legislators are trying to get their arms around truancy in the state. Discussion about the most promising bill, the bipartisan HB 437, illustrates just how complicated the problem is.
    We have 54,000 kids who are habitually truant, which means they have 10 or more unexcused absences in a school year. That should take your breath away.
    Studies and common sense tell us that these kids are most likely to drop out.
    Four lawmakers whose political coloration ranges from conservative to liberal have teamed up to carry the bill: Reps. Patricio Ruiloba, D-Albuquerque; Jimmie Hall, R-Albuquerque, James Townsend, R-Artesia, and Sen. John Sapien, D-Corrales. On Saturday, the most conservative, Townsend, and most liberal, Ruilobo, sat together to sell their bill to the House Education Committee.
    HB 437 calls for earlier and more intensive interventions. It requires schools to have a family resources program, work with agencies and community organizations, and notify parents. It would suspend drivers licenses.
    Legislators used as models successful programs in Carlsbad and Albuquerque’s Atrisco Heritage High School.

  • Rental properties can make good investments, but they come with risk

    BY NATHAN SILLIN
    Practical Money Skills