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Today's Opinions

  • Woodworking business gets startup help

    BY METTA SMITH
    Vice President, Lending and Client Services, Accion

  • State doesn’t take its own advice to buy local

    BY LORETTA HALL
    Guest Columnist

  • Yes! We have no bananas

    “Bananas –59¢/lb.” Bananas are rich metaphors for the untold oddities that lurk deep in nature and in humans.  
    People see different things in a banana plantation. You hear them called banana “plants;” others call them “trees.” Botanically, bananas grow on a plant whose “trunks” of tightly-woven leaves look to all the world like trees. Say what you will.
    Equally strange, the heavy bunches of bananas grow upwards from their stem-end, which looks upside down to our eyes. Nor is that surprise the last.  
    In the early 1800s, sailors returning from trips to the tropical Americas would earn a little extra profit by loading on board the mostly unknown long, yellow fruit. In 1866, one Carl B. Frank began the first planned importing of bananas from northern Panama to New York City.
    That same decade saw the birth of banana republics, a name coined in a 1904 book of short stories by O. Henry.  
    Bananas are now as common as fish, but the exotic fruit is still popular in today’s markets. Nothing grows a tougher wrapper that makes peeling and eating so easy. Nothing else has a bite-size cross section that neatly reseals the end where it is bitten or cut.

  • Conscience and Republican Convention delegate voting rules

    BY DR. L. JOHN VAN TIL
    Visions and Values

  • Nonlinear model helps businesses prep for rapid growth

    New Mexico entrepreneurs who want to start a business or take an existing venture to the next level need a model that allows the business to “scale up” – to improve profitability as demand increases for its product or service.
    A scalable model attracts more investors because it equips the business to adapt to a larger market without significantly increasing its costs. And that has a positive impact on economic development in New Mexico, where a home-grown business that’s prepared for exponential growth brings more out-of-state money home.
    Different paths
    Many entrepreneurs are content to grow in a linear, conservative fashion: When sales increase, the business hires more people or buys more capital to accommodate bigger demand. The business has a stable bottom line, but its profitability doesn’t increase over time or it crawls slowly and inefficiently upward.
    A business with a scalable model, by contrast, aims for faster, cheaper growth by breaking up the sales growth/cost growth relationship. It grows exponentially by keeping costs stagnant when sales ramp up.

  • The cultural challenge of gender identity

    The kid was obviously talented. He was athletic and graceful. He could sing, dance, memorize lines, and occasionally did a cartwheel across the room for fun.
    We were in an amateur show produced by a local community organization. Most cast members were adults. The kid held his own, did fine, brimmed with confidence.  
    This kid is going to be a big success in life, I thought.
    A few weeks into rehearsals, his grandmother pulled me aside. He is biologically female, she told me. It was a lot to absorb, to say the least. The grandmother was not confiding in me because of any special relationship. She told me, I thought, because others already knew. It was not a secret.
    This child knew who he was from age three, the grandma explained. He had a girl’s name and was treated like a girl. For his third birthday his family bought him a tutu. He refused to wear it and told them he was a boy, and that was that.  
    This was the most accepting family a child could have hoped for. “We told him, ‘We didn’t know, we didn’t understand,’” the grandma told me. They changed what had to be changed, including his name, and never tried to change his mind.   

  • Letter to the Editor 6-26-16

    Honored to attend
    Vietnam War ceremony

    I was honored to attend The Vietnam War 50th Anniversary Commemoration Ceremony held at the Santa Fe Veteran’s Memorial on Saturday, June 18. New Mexico Department of Veterans’ Services, New Mexico State Council of Vietnam Veterans of America, Northern Mew Mexico Chapter 996, the American Legion Riders Chapter 25, the Santa Fe National Cemetery and Josetta Rodriguez did a wonderful job in putting this event together.
    Eloquent and passionate speeches were given by State Rep. Bob Wooley, Dist. 66, who co-chairs the Military and Veteran’s Affairs Legislative Committee, and John Garcia, U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs, former Deputy Assistant Secretary of The Office of Intergovernmental Affairs, and former Cabinet Secretary of New Mexico Veterans Services.  
    Both Vietnam Veterans gave personal accounts of their involvement, participation and how it impacted their lives.
    Santa Fe Mayor Javier Gonzales gave thanks and recognition for all who served.
    After the ceremony, Vietnam War veterans were presented with a certificate of appreciation by the Department of Veterans’ Services for their service during the war and were also given a special 50th anniversary commemorative pin.

  • Save New Mexico’s historic sites!

    New Mexico is about to fire Billy the Kid.
    Coronado, Victorio, the conquistadores, and the U. S. Cavalry are getting the sack, too.
    Visitors come here to see these icons at the state’s seven historic sites. Just in time for peak tourist season, the state Cultural Affairs Department announced a draconian plan to kick out the very people who know the most about these sites – their managers.
    The department announced a plan in late May to save money by reorganizing the Historic Sites Division, combing six sites into three regions with new managers. This would affect Jemez, Coronado, Fort Selden, Camino Real, Lincoln and Fort Stanton historic sites. Bosque Redondo and Los Luceros aren’t affected (yet). Another six positions department-wide are also on the block. But the department wants to hire 13 “critical employees,” including three PR people.
    Terminations are effective Aug. 3, if the State Personnel Board approves the plan at its July 21 meeting.
    Let’s recall that during the legislative session, declining revenues forced lawmakers to shrink the budget and give the administration permission to do more cutting, if necessary.
    It’s always a grim process, but in reducing costs, two principles ought to be at work. First, spread the pain evenly.