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Today's Opinions

  • Fixing state’s crime rate should be top priority

    We are the crime leader among the 50 states. Fixing that situation, or at least mitigating it, should be our first priority. Nothing else counts. If we aren’t safe, we can’t function. Talk to the people of San Bernardino, where the incident was terrorism, or Colorado Springs.
    I admit to not focusing on crime in general. I figured that while the Albuquerque police had a nasty problem, probably it was a culture and training problem and would be tended in time. Silly me, middle class and all that, living in a semi-upscale Albuquerque neighborhood near the University of New Mexico that is, yes, complete with the occasional crime.
    While I admit my naiveté, I have some acquaintance with crime, albeit of the mild sort. My dad did 4.5 months in the federal pen on some fraud matters. I have been on a couple of criminal jury panels. My mom, at age 91, was mugged on her driveway.
    Here is the relevant statement: “Colorado’s total crime rate (2,840 crimes per 100,000 population) has decreased by 36 percent since peaking in 2005, leading to an improved ranking. Vermont (1,620) ranked first in 2014 while New Mexico (4,140) ranked last. The crime rate decreased in all but four states from 2013 to 2014.”

  • Worst state economy competition resumes

    As 2015 closes, it’s déjà vu all over again for the New Mexico economy. As in 2014, we’re competing for the dubious honor of the nation’s worst performing state economy.
    The differences this time are the measure – unemployment rate instead of job losses – and the competition. The preliminary figures for the first six months of 2014 showed job losses. In October, only climate-change-regulation ravaged West Virginia had a higher rate, at 6.9 percent. Ours was 6.8 percent.
    But we beat West Virginia in a key area, reports the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, which said, “The only significant over-the-year (unemployment) rate increase was in New Mexico (plus 0.6 percentage point).”
    By way of comparison, the U.S. unemployment rate was 5 percent in October. Colorado’s was 3.8 percent. Some maps illustrate the Colorado contrast. The maps accompany the announcement of the new edition of the “Toward a More Competitive Colorado” report, released Nov. 18 by the Metro Denver Economic Development Corporation. See metrodenver.org/research-reports/toward-a-more-competitive-colorado.

  • Letters to the Editor 12-11-15

    Our community Co-op Market needs a holiday boost for 2016

    I thought a quick note to our community might be very helpful given some of the recent issues our Co-op Market is experiencing. You may not know that the Co-op Market is struggling financially.
    Smith’s has hurt some of the small businesses in town including the Co-op, and there have been numerous leadership and staff changes in the last 12 months. The unexpected death in November of the recently hired general manager has also had a significant effect on staff morale and created uncertainty at a very difficult time.  
    There are several operational challenges that the staff are working on but the big idea is that revenue is down 20 percent and cutting expenses 20 percent is not a realistic short or long term option.  
    The Co-op needs to increase revenue.  
    So why my letter to you?  Our community Co-op is struggling and if we value it we should take steps to help.  If we want it to survive and ultimately prosper we need to participate in a few small ways.
    What can we do about it?
    • Join or renew early. If you’re a member consider renewing to help with cash flow. If you’re not a member, please consider joining.  

  • Letter to the Editor 12-9-15

    Radical Islamic terrorism threat to world peace

    The greatest threat to world peace is radical Islamic terrorism.
    Radical Islamic terrorists killed 14 Americans in San Bernardino, California; 130 people in Paris; five military personnel in Chatanooga, Tennesee, and 13 soldiers in Fort Hood, Texas; a soldier in Canada; beheaded journalists and aid workers in the Middle East; killed non-Muslims in Copenhagen, Paris and Tunisia; attacked the Jewish Museum in Brussels, a mall in Kenya, Iraqi Christians, Syrian Christians, 40 churches in Egypt, our embassy in Benghazi, and the Boston Marathon.
    Thousands of attacks by Islamic terrorists have occurred against non-Muslims, and many thousands have been killed. For attacks since 1990 see wikipedia.org   and enter list of Islamic terrorist attacks.
    Islamic terrorists wantonly attack and kill non-Muslims whom they consider infidels.
    We have to destroy the Islamic terrorists, deport sympathizers and restrict entry to the U.S. of people prone to conduct Islamic terrorism.
    Donald Moskowitz
    Londonderry, NH

  • Polling presidential campaign Pinocchios

    My local daily newspaper does relatively little by way of covering the presidential primary campaigns currently under way back in places like New Hampshire, South Carolina and Iowa, so last week I checked online for some updates.
    It was quite informative.
    The night before, I had heard on national television that prominent Republican movers and shakers are increasingly worried by the prospect that billionaire real estate mogul Donald Trump seems to have a sizeable lead in the race for their nomination.
    It is still almost a year before any Republican primary voters in any states can cast their ballots on the issue, and, in politics, a lot can happen in the course of a year. Nonetheless, reports have it that Republican Party insiders think they would lose the 2016 election if Trump were at the top of their ticket.
    Too divisive, they say. Arrogant. A bully. He’s already alienated whole blocs of voters and now he’s even intimated that CNN should pay him $5 million simply to appear alongside the other candidates at the next GOP debate.
    There could well be something to those concerns. Trump does come across as boorish at times. He stretches the truth, makes things up, like that yarn about watching whole crowds of Muslims cheering in New Jersey when the twin towers crashed to the ground on 9/11.

  • Bernalillo County summits develop entrepreneurship

    By Finance New Mexico

  • Disregard fear to find true human potential

    BY BOB FUSELIER
    Special to the Monitor

  • Public forums battle diversity

    “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was....”
    These famously taut lines gain new currency from time to time. Now is such a time.
    Our land is besieged with cross fire of two words, “conservative” and “liberal.” With all said, they impute every vice borne in humans. The flaws are not confined to fiscal blunders.
    All camps deploy the blunted bywords to attack everything from choices of foods and poster phrases to word meanings themselves. “Liar, liar” is the prevailing counter point.   
    Would such deeds make more sense viewed differently? A thought or two can be drawn from “ecology.” As a framework for people, consider an ecosystem.     
    An ecosystem is made stronger by diversity, which works to stabilize and sustain the whole. Species eat different foods. Species find food and water in different ways. Species move differently and face different risks and ailments.
    Environmental conditions at every level constantly change. To meet change, diversity increases the chance of life forms able to adapt and thrive.