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Today's Opinions

  • Heartworm disease in cats is often overlooked

     

    Heartworm disease is transmitted to an animal through the bite of a mosquito carrying heartworm larvae, which eventually settle into the blood vessels of the lungs or within the heart itself. 

    Although cats are less susceptible than dogs to heartworm infection, our feline friends are still very much at risk of heartworm disease. 

    “Cats have some innate resistance to infection, and the worms seem to prefer living in dogs rather than in cats,” said Dr. Audrey Cook, an associate professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. “In addition, the tests we traditionally use in dogs, such as the Knotts test and heartworm antigen tests, are not very sensitive in cats as the number of worms is much lower.”

  • Interpreting reliable energy data

     

    The news media is being overwhelmed with accusations of “bad science” and “misinterpreted data” when dealing with the production and consumption of fossil-fuel/renewable/nuclear energy.

    Since 1974, the autonomous International Energy Association (IEA), organization has worked diligently to generate unbiased reliable/affordable/conventional/renewable energy-related data for its member/cooperating-non-member countries. Between them the 30-plus member IEA countries account for just under half of the world’s energy generation/consumption and include United States, Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Korean Republic, Spain and United Kingdom. Cooperating/nonmembers include Brazil, China, India, Mexico and Russia; just under the remaining half of global generation/consumption. 

    Its reports are utilized globally by all the major energy companies, academia and environmentalists.

  • Trivializing the danger, shifting the blame

    WIPP was never going to solve America’s nuclear waste problem. We have too much waste and too many kinds of waste to put into this one facility, New Mexico’s long-controversial Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. And even if you somehow believe geologic disposal is a great idea, there just aren’t enough locations with a prayer of sequestering the nasty stuff from the biosphere (or future human intrusion) to build dozens more WIPPs. Not to mention the trillions it would cost.
    But if WIPP’s real purpose was to create the illusion that we’d found a solution — so we could keep on making more nuclear weapons and waste — then it has done a pretty good job of that, at least until this year’s accidents and on-going release.
    Public relations has always been a big part of the WIPP story. Now it’s driving official Department of Energy responses to the recent events. Yup, they’re at it again.

  • Proudly praising pop

    Backyards are smoking with the embers of charcoals, the air filled with fumes of lighter fluid. Guys are outside wearing aprons saying, “#1 Dad” and “King of the Grill.”
    Burnt toast and uncooked eggs served in bed. An avalanche of ugly ties. Toilet shaped beer mugs. Canned bacon spray. Caveman-feet slippers. SpongeBob golf club head covers.
    Yeah, it’s Father’s Day again. Children all over the world enjoy dedicating a day to their favorite lounge chair burper.
    Papa. Babbo. Tata. Vader. Otac. Banketi. Patri. Buwa. Daa. Patro. Otosan. Pabbi.
    Wherever you are or however you say it, it’s the same in all languages across the world. Hey Dad, can I borrow the keys to the car?
    Here in America, Father’s Day is a time for men do what they do best — set things on fire and tell bad jokes while knocking down a few cold ones. Norman Rockwell images capture the spirit of our country’s dads; fathers carving the Thanksgiving turkeys, guys chewing the fat in a barber’s shop, teaching their son how to catch a baseball.

  • USDA helps millions of rural homebuyers own their future

    Owning your own home is part of the American dream. For 65 years, USDA has helped millions of rural residents achieve the dream of homeownership through our affordable home loan programs. This year, USDA Rural Development has helped nearly 3.4 million rural families and individuals become homebuyers through 65 years of delivering housing assistance.
    Affordable home financing creates ladders of opportunity to help families grow and thrive. Every year, USDA Rural Development’s direct and guaranteed home loans help tens of thousands of rural residents become homeowners.
    Here in New Mexico since the start of the Obama Administration, USDA Rural Development has made direct or guaranteed loans for more than 10,000 rural residents.
    For example, 21-year old Marianna Wheeler of Deming, and her 3-year-old son, Gilbert Ray became two of those 10,000 homeowners after they moved into a new home which was made possible through USDA’s Rural Development Direct Home loan program.
    We also provide a home repair loan program, and grants for very-low-income seniors, to help homeowners protect and preserve their most precious asset.

  • The secret of the soft sell

    No one likes to feel hustled while shopping, whether it’s in a retail store or trade show booth.
    To attract customers without brazen hawking or downright pushiness, businesses need to refine the art of the soft sell. That begins by making the store or trade show booth an intentional destination for people who are truly interested in what the business sells.
    Relationship skills
    While any business would like to sell at least one product to every person who walks in the door, that’s the type of unrealistic goal that can turn sales reps into apex predators.
    A long-term perspective toward potential customers focuses on developing a relationship that lasts longer than one transaction. It lays a foundation through attraction rather than persuasion.
    A retailer might begin with an irresistible offer that draws customers into a store — say, 20 percent off on purchases over $100 or one-day-only sales on a hot-selling product.
    A trade-show vendor might offer freebies to customers in return for contact information. Some vendors create a sense of urgency by offering something of value to the first 20 customers who sign up. A startup financial planner, for example, could offer a 15-minute consultation to the first 15 visitors as a way to build a client base.
    The light touch

  • Op-ed comments not scientifically valid

    Marita Noon’s op-ed in the June 6 Los Alamos Monitor is just one more example of someone hiding their own agenda by labeling themselves as an organization dedicated to educating the public.
    Ms. Noon claims that the EPA hides their use of “bad science” so that they can continue to list species as endangered with the result that farmers, ranchers, and anyone with an interest in extracting anything from the Earth, is prevented from accessing the water and land needed for their enterprise.
    The problem is that her evidence consists only of opinions offered by people representing organizations with no serious scientific credentials, and whose agendas are clearly anti-government in general.
    A Google search on the organizations mentioned in her op-ed, including the American Stewards of Liberty, the Institute for Trade Standards and Sustainable Development (ITSSD), Citizens’ Alliance for Responsible Energy (CARE) and Energy Makes America Great, Inc., quickly reveals that these organizations are intertwined and have an agenda focused on smoothing the pathway for companies to pay little or no attention to the environmental damage left behind as a result of their activities, including contaminated water aquifers and soil.

  • Pawlak has it all wrong

    In May 30 Los Alamos Monitor, Mr. John Pawlak made the following statements in his column about the leader of the NRA and about NRA members:
    “Enter one of the strangest and most annoying grapes, Wayne LaPierre, spokesperson for those who can’t muster enough hatred and stupidity on their own, and so they hire someone to do it for them.”
    “He (Wayne LaPierre) doesn’t have enough of a brain stem to support a headache.”
    “The logic used by LaPierre and his ‘shoot first and ask questions later’ followers is mind numbing.”
    “So, just how moronic can the NRA get?”
    “LaPierre and his card-carrying ditto-heads would say, “The only thing that stops a bad 3-year-old with a gun is a good 1-year-old with a gun!”
    “The more I think about it, the more attractive tongue-chewing sounds to me. Maybe we can get LaPierre and his “I have the right to shoot people” gun-nuts to chew theirs?”
    I am an NRA member, but I don’t harbor hatred and I am not stupid. I don’t shoot first and ask questions later. I am not a moron. I am not a ditto-head. I don’t have the right to shoot people. I am not a gun nut.