.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Optimism about the state but the nation, not so much

    We hear a lot that civility died in the recent election, but it survives here and there.
    Republican Janice Arnold-Jones and Democrat Alan Webber, former candidates for governor, proved that speaking recently to New Mexico Press Women.
    On New Mexico elections:
    “The truth lost,” said Arnold-Jones, a former state representative. “I have never seen such complete willingness to abandon the truth – on both sides.” She said Senate Majority Leader Michael Sanchez, the target of the governor’s political broadsides, “was a thorn in the side but a decent human being.”
    “Michael Sanchez was defeated by a scurrilous campaign,” said Webber. “It was a dark spot on the election.”
    He said the crime bills introduced in the special session “were a carefully laid trap to go after Democrats, in particular, Michael Sanchez.” The reality is that legislators “are too close to voters to be soft on crime,” he said.
    On New Mexico’s economy:
    Despite continuing bad news, the two describe themselves as optimistic. The way forward, both say, is to focus on infrastructure.

  • NM ranks 47th in ratio of employment to population

    New Mexicans don’t especially like work, or at least work captured in official statistics.
    This work aversion is a continuing theme here. It’s something cultural, one of those rents in the social fabric that is central to our systemic troubles.
    The state Department of Workforce Solutions recently provided valuable additional insight by reviewing the propensity for work in our 33 counties. The measure is the ratio of employment to population (E/P). The ratio reports the percentage of the population age 16 and over that is not in an institution such as a jail and not in the military.
    The states stacking on top of Oklahoma lead in diligence. With 68 percent of its population employed in 2015, Nebraska has the highest employment-to-population ratio. Minnesota follows with 67.6 percent and Iowa has 67.3 percent. The other end of line finds West Virginia at 49.4 percent; Mississippi, 52.2 percent; and – ta da – New Mexico, 53.5 percent.
    “For the five-year period 2010 to 2014, Los Alamos County posted the highest E/P ratio, at 62.3 percent,” DWS said. For the 2010–2014 period, the national rate was 57.7 percent, with New Mexico at 53.9 percent.

  • Business altruism pays off even when payoff isn’t the point

    For many businesses, philanthropic giving has an element of self-interest: It’s giving with the expectation of getting something back in the form of tax breaks and image building.

    But more and more businesses are discovering that unselfish giving has a value that’s immeasurable and that reverberates throughout the community, the workforce and the economy. 

    Community quality of life 

    Businesses that create and nurture an organizational culture based on gratitude can drive significant change that benefits everyone, not just their customers, especially if they can involve likeminded entrepreneurs.

    When a business spearheads a project that solves a local problem or provides a public service, such as building a bike path or setting aside company land for habitat restoration, it demonstrates an investment in the city or town in which it’s based and a commitment to making the host community a better place for everyone to live and work. 

  • Letters to the Editor 11-11-16

    PEEC thanks community, volunteers for successful Pajarito Trail Fest race

    The Pajarito Environmental Education Center would like to thank the organizers, volunteers and runners of the Pajarito Trail Fest race for once again donating a portion of the proceeds to PEEC to help get kids outside.
    The Trail Fest is an amazing event for our community. Not only is it well-run, providing excellent support and fun for the participants, it gives back to many community groups.
    This year they gave out a total of $5,500. In the spirit of the Trail Fest, PEEC will use the funds given to get kids outside on the trails, both as part of school and for fun. We’re so grateful that the Pajarito Trail Fest has supported our work for many years. A special thank you to race director Petra Pirc for helping us to raise the next generation of trail lovers.
    Katherine Watson
    Executive Director, PEEC

    LAAC thanks community for Pumpkin Glow success

    On behalf of the Los Alamos Arts Council, I would like to thank the community for coming out and supporting the Pumpkin Glow.

  • Vaping industry meets resistance in Congress

    BY PAUL J. GESSING
    Rio Grande Foundation

  • The VA health care lesson

    BY BOB HAGAN
    Coffee on a Cold Morning

  • Letters to the Editor 11-6-2016

    Support for
    Stover for State Rep. Dist. 43 

     

    I am supporting Sharon Stover for State Representative. I have known and worked with Sharon for years, and she has always been kind, dependable and inclusive. Sharon is a leader with knowledge of Los Alamos and New Mexico, competent and professional.

    I am speaking to one issue that has surfaced.  Many people have tried to suggest her actions regarding issuing same-sex marriage licenses in Los Alamos County were motivated by bias.  Rather than acting from bias, however, Sharon was part of a Professional and unified effort by all 33 county clerks in New Mexico to get the courts to decide on one standard for the whole state.  I believe their actions were courageous and necessary since the Legislature at the time refused to resolve the issue through the appropriate method -- legislation. As soon as the New Mexico judge affirmed a ruling for same sex marriage and the New Mexico Supreme also affirmed it, the Los Alamos County Clerk’s office has issued marriage licenses to same sex couples since September 2013.

  • Public art is tool for economic, community development

    Public art has been a force for economic development in New Mexico at least since the Great Depression, when the federal government paid hundreds of unemployed artists to create murals, sculpture and other artworks that grace federal buildings to this day. 

    Nearly a century later, many New Mexico cities are using public art projects to promote economic vitality by creating a foundation for community identity, centralizing disparate neighborhoods with a collective vision and attracting the attention of businesses that value culturally vibrant communities. One of those cities is Rio Rancho.

    “Public art speaks to our culture and how we value the places we live in,” said Daniel Chamberlain, an architect with FBT Architects and chairman of Rio Rancho’s volunteer Arts Commission. “It is a wonderful negotiator of vision. It’s a quality-of-life driver.”

    The payback can be enormous, Chamberlain said, even if it’s hard to measure. 

    Committed to the arts