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Today's Opinions

  • Grothus is part of our history

    Dear Editor,

  • LANL is the problem

    Dear Editor,

  • Albuquerque term limits questioned

    One of the greatest frauds in recent history is the story we have been sold on term limits.We are told they are good for us, will clean up politics and government. We are told it will be good for democracy.Nothing is further from the truth. And this ignores the fact that we have always had limits on how long someone can serve – it is called an election.All term limits do is take good people, who have gained experience, knowledge and an understanding of the process and force them out.For what reason?

  • Guest Column: Think about sustainability at tax time

    With Tax Day on April 15 and Earth Day on April 22, this is a good time for New Mexicans to consider investing in solar energy systems and sustainable or green building – low-risk investments that benefit both the environment and taxpayers’ wallets.Gov. Bill Richardson has declared New Mexico the Clean Energy State. Policies put into place and legislation enacted to encourage solar energy system installation, green building and energy efficiency have taken root and are starting to bear fruit.New Mexico ranks second in the nation for solar resources.

  • Hate has never resolved a conflict

    Dear Editor,

  • Students care about more than iPods

    Dear Editor,

  • Off and On: Open government important to us all

    New Mexico recently celebrated Sunshine Week, a time in which we all think about open government.Open government is important to all of us; it is not just a newspaper or media thing. The public needs to understand how important it is to lift the veil of secrecy from the workings of our government. And it’s something we should focus on year-round.There was a bill in the Legislature that would have opened conference committees to the public. The bill was introduced by Sen.

  • The significance of the beard

    Bill Richardson’s beard is much more significant than you might imagine. But, first, let me reminisce.It started like this. The late 1940s. The first television signal had been broadcast from New York two decades earlier, but the first signal this 10-year-old saw was a picture of flamboyant Gorgeous George prancing around a wrestling ring.We lived in a government project, which is noteworthy only to explain this was not a neighborhood where the latest technology would be on display.