.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • But I digress: Constitutional wisdom

    We The People ... a beautiful sentiment, isn’t it? It was pure genius to use such simple words to launch such a powerful document. It took just three little words – written, by the way, in very large letters – to summarize the entire purpose for writing the document in the first place. Of course, I’m talking about the Constitution. It’s an amazing document.

    Ever read it?

  • Our View: Early budget work needs work

    The proposals coming from the House Appropriators Committee were a mixed bag and a bit hard to understand.

    While adding millions to energy and water work, it cut out work on the lab’s Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement facility. This is hard to understand.

    You can argue that we don’t need a huge new stockpile of nuclear weapons, that is fine. But to say we need no work, no production, no research seems foolish to us.

  • Medical Minute: Doctors are the driving force

    LAMC is growing.

    New service lines are being developed, and major construction projects are on the drawing table. But without our great physicians, none of those things would make much difference.

    To assure that our hospital continues its progress toward becoming a world-class facility, physician development is among the highest priorities.

  • Dispelling 'Big Oil' myths

    Dear Editor,

    Ned Cantwell’s recent editorial piece drove home the point that most of America cannot, will not, or does not have the time to understand the reasons for the increase in the price of oil and gasoline. Since I have had the time, I hope I can clear up a few myths.

    Myth #1: “Big Oil” is responsible for the price of oil and could choose to lower it.

    Oil is a global market; its price is determined by the intersection of world demand (increasing fast) and world supply (stagnating).

  • Trail maintenance benefits all

    Dear Editor,

    I read Mr. Cortesy’s June 18 piece, “Bikers beneficial to forests” with interest. I, too, have rarely seen anyone else doing trail work, but I know plenty of it gets done nonetheless, because without it trails would not be built nor remain usable for long.

  • Partnerships key to conservation

    Prior to moving to Los Alamos, I worked for a small business that contracted conservation services to many utility providers across the Southwest, including the Albuquerque and Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority (ABCWUA). During that time, Albuquerque witnessed a 30-percent decrease in its overall water consumption, totaling more than 100 billion gallons saved – enough water to serve the needs for the county of Los Alamos for more than 70 years.

  • When will 'good fortune' come?

    Dear Editor,

    In the June 11 edition of the Monitor, there was a big spread about the school board approving a “$40 million infrastructure-rebuilding project.” And the LAPS contractor said it was “a one-time tax increase ee then we can support this program on into the future, and with some good fortune and growth (italics added) the tax base will exceed the projected growth and we will be able to increase the amount of money that can be generated for bond sales in the future.”

  • Another outrageous decision

    Dear Editor,

    So we have another outrageous decision by the U.S. Supreme Court, granting the right of Habeas Corpus to Guantanamo prisoners.

    Sen. John McCain calls it one of the worst decisions in history. Newt Gingrich calls it the worst – even worse than the Dred Scott fugitive slave law decision. The Wall Street Journal tops them both by comparing it to the recent terrorist-freeing prison break engineered by the Taliban in Afghanistan, calling the breakout “Habeas Corpus – Taliban style.”