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Today's Opinions

  • We love our tree!

    Dear Editor,

    With no notice to anyone in the community, half of the huge willow tree at Pion Elementary has been chopped down, reportedly because its roots are getting into the sewer system. A local plumber has volunteered to help reroute the sewer lines if it will save the tree. The other half of the tree was scheduled to go Monday.

    Students, parents and alumni throughout the community planned a gathering to keep that from happening. Some were on site as early as 6 a.m. A petition is also being circulated throughout the Pion district to help save the rest of the tree.

  • Let's avoid a permanent divide

    Dear Council Members,

    Irene Powell’s skate park location letter (June 5) seems to make a great deal of sense. It addresses most of the issues raised, with better solutions than we have now, while allowing for a rapid building of the skate park. It appears to be a good compromise that will give all parties what they want.

  • Los Alamos can make own future

    Dear Editor,

    Regarding the West Jemez Road Bypass (WJB), your article quoted LANL Traffic Engineer and Transportation Board member Trask as saying, “if we are going to spend money at all, then we should do it correctly.”

    Nothing could be more accurate. How incorrect it would be to spend vast sums of resident tax dollars for an expensive and unneeded long stretch of asphalt right along the edge of Los Alamos Canyon. Los Alamos County needs to get beyond the anger of DOE constructing the “toll booths” and make our own future.

  • Our View: Anderson era comes to an end

    Dr. James Anderson stepped out of his office at 751 Trinity Drive today and into retirement. As superintendent of Los Alamos Public Schools for 14 years, he leaves behind a proud legacy.

    Sen. Pete Domenici recognized this, saying, “Although the school district will certainly miss his leadership, I believe he is leaving a solid foundation for even greater educational growth and development for students and the entire community.”

  • Our View: What we believe in

    Saturday was Flag Day, the day we pay an official tribute to the American flag, the ideals it stands for and the sacrifices made to preserve them.

    While we should honor the flag every day, an extra day is a good time to remember the symbol that stands for what we believe in: freedom.

    President Woodrow Wilson recognized during his first Flag Day address in 1915 that the freedoms the U.S. flag stands for were not and never would be free.

    And American blood has been spilled time and time again to preserve our liberties.

  • Our View: Time to invest in our future

    The school board approved a measure that asks residents to back a bond resolution to help repair and rebuild our schools.

    This is a measure – and effort – that we should support.

    Our schools are old and in need of repair – and in some cases outright replacement. The board recognizes this fact and its members are taking the right steps to move us forward.

    Yes, this will be a tax increase; there is no way of getting around that. And yes, these are difficult times in Los Alamos right now.

  • But I digress: Even if we disagree, can we talk?

    A man I’ve known for many years recently told me that he no longer wants to have anything to do with me. He accused “my kind” of being responsible for the 50 million deaths incurred during WWII, the turmoil we endured from the Cold War, the more than 50,000 deaths during the Vietnam War, the collapse of America’s moral infrastructure, the decline of the nuclear family and finally for the 9/11 attack.

    He summarized his explosive outburst by telling me that he was sick of my “anti-American pacifist left wing liberal hippie drivel.”

  • Off and On: Air is filled with more than pollen

    Been sneezing lately? Eyes a bit watery? Nose a bit irritated?

    Well, it could just be that it is more than the pollen that is flying about that is causing you distress.

    According to two Associated Press stories, there is more flying in the air in this part of the world than dust.

    San Juan County ranks No. 6 on a list of U.S. counties with the highest carbon dioxide emissions in a study published in a scientific journal.