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Today's Opinions

  • Civility lacking

    Longtime bicyclist Steven Booth had a concern and while local officials were willing to listen, there was little they could do.

    Booth told county officials that it is very dangerous to ride a bike here. Drivers cut cyclists off or just can’t see those folks on the human-powered vehicles.

    He said it is so bad that he is going to stop riding to work here.

    While education may be a part of the problem, it may go deeper than that. There seems to be a lack of courtesy that goes beyond just a bicyclist.

  • Progress often taken by small steps

    This may seem like an odd place to write about sports, but we have done so before and this subject is worth hammering home.

    Whether or not you are a big basketball fan, March is certainly a time when that sport hits its high note in the college ranks.

    If you have any feeling for the game, you have been watching the teams slug it out in some great exhibitions of talent and hard work.

    But if you are like many viewers, you may have missed the best basketball being played – the women’s bracket.

  • Honda hopes for historic hybrid

    Remember gasoline prices last Fourth of July?

    Those were the days household budgets collided with gasoline prices that were over $4 per gallon.

    Even us geologists – who are sometimes quietly glad to see high energy and metals prices because our jobs depend on them – whimpered loudly when we pulled into the pumps. I can quite clearly recollect the first time I put more than $125 of gas into my beloved 1987 pickup. Ouch!

  • A golden age is within our reach

    Recent progress in technology has put an ideal future well within the reach of mankind.

    That is, if we can find the will and intelligence to properly accelerate and deploy these newly developed capabilities.

    The technologies involved include (but are not limited to) Nanotech, Biotech, Infotech, and one you will be hearing more about, Cogtech. We now have an unprecedented command of nature and natural resources.

    What then prevents us from moving into the utopia this should imply?

  • Let’s use our heads about Trinity

    Dear Editor,

    Route 502 is a state highway, upgraded to feed the lab, not the town! Two lanes each way divide at the Y into lanes dumping into LA or exiting from LA at 50mph. During rush-hour almost all of these bumper-to-bumper cars are going to or from the lab - somewhere besides the LA townsite.

    So, the main (90-plus percent?) users of 502 during these periods are not local residents.

  • Where do cancer patients go after treatment?

    This sounds like fun, doesn’t it? Standing on a golden beach, the sun beating down, crowds cheering, as you waddle your way under a flexing pole.

    I bet you’re thinking that’s the celebration of finishing cancer treatment. Unfortunately, you’d be wrong.

    Limbo is not so much what you do, as where you go.

    For months you’ve been coddled and cooed over by doctors and nurses, attentively listening to your every ache and pain, on standby 24 hours a day in case of that dreaded 101.5-degree fever.

  • Please, no roundabouts

    Dear Editor,

    Is the county’s current scheme for Trinity Drive a solution without a problem?  What is the “problem?”

    Is it lack of “prettiness” in the commercial area from Oppenheimer eastward? Is it excessive speed? Is it an unsafe intersection? Is it poor business access along Trinity? Is it improved ease of shopping for off-the-hill commuters? Or is it a failure to meet the definition of a “complete street?”

  • Look before you decide on Trinity

    Dear Editor,

     It didn’t take long for the community discussion concerning improvements to Trinity to devolve into two lanes vs. four lanes and stoplights vs. roundabouts. Unfortunately, these two lines of discussion miss the important points all together.

    The world is changing in fundamental ways we will probably not realize for years to come. It’s important to re-design Trinity to meet the needs it will serve over the next 20-30 years rather than the last 50.