.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Letter to the Editor 1-10-16

    Do right thing with incorrectly delivered mail

    To all postal patrons in Los Alamos (especially Western Area). As we all know mail delivery in Los Alamos is less than satisfactory and frequently we get mail that belongs to someone else. It mostly happens when our regular carriers have the day off, or is on vacation, that they assign routes to substitutes who are usually unfamiliar with the route or the “sorter” is not paying close enough attention to their job and puts mail on the wrong carriers route.
    If you are one who receives mail addressed to someone else do the right thing and either take it to the correct recipient, who is usually your neighbor, or put it back out on your mail box so the post office can deliver it to the correct person(s). Don’t just throw it away! These miss delivered items could be checks, bills, or other important items that are important for the intended addressee to receive.
    Need I also remind you that it is a federal offense to hamper the delivery of mail to its intended destination? So please do the right thing and make an extra effort to get the mail that isn’t yours to the correct destination. I know that I do.
    Robert Visel
    Los Alamos

  • Letters to the editor 1-8-16

    Voting yes on mill levy is a ‘no brainer’

    Please make a special effort to vote in favor for HB33 Mill Levy in the January 2016 Special Election. Approval will not increase your property taxes. Voting is easy – your ballot will be mailed directly to you. Please remember to sign the outer envelope!
    Why vote? HB33 will provide over $13 million over the next six years to the Los Alamos public schools. Funding schools is a “no brainer” in a community as fortunate as we are and with citizens who put a priority on education. I believe in this community. I believe that the voters in this town will absolutely vote in support of HB33. I will vote yes and await for the results of an overwhelming positive voter response. Thank you in advance.
    Kelly Myers
    Los Alamos

    LA County resolution in support of the
    Endangered Species Act

  • Letters to the Editor 1-6-16

    Los Alamos needs to put money where mouth is and vote yes on mill levy

    In January, Los Alamos voters will have an important opportunity to demonstrate their commitment to education when mail ballots are sent out to approve continuance of the HB33 Mill Levy in support of the Los Alamos Public Schools.
    Approval will not increase property tax rates, but will provide over $13 million across six years for student technology and network infrastructure as well as funds for musical instruments, athletic supplies and equipment, heating and cooling projects and restroom upgrades for older buildings across the district, and general maintenance projects from roof repairs and handicapped ramps to improved PA systems and new fire panels.

  • Has the GOP changed energy policy since taking Congress?

    BY MARITA NOON
    Executive Director, Energy Makes America Great

  • Sometimes the world opens to inspection

    On rare occasions, the world opens itself to being inspected in new and unusual ways. Such a time came in 1883 on a scale that was unthinkable.
         Some story lines of the past grow larger in hindsight. In 1883, Karl Marx died; Bernard Kroger opened his first grocery store; and Charles Fritts used selenium and gold to make the first working, solid-state solar cell. Their aftereffects are with us today.
         The larger news was in August that year: A volcanic island exploded in the Sunda Strait between the islands of Java and Sumatra. The blast went round the world and turned the island with the oddly harsh name – “Krakatoa” – into a treasure trove for science.
         Effects of the rarity advanced the ways in which we know the world. The stories fill a global canvas.
         Evidence says the blast was the loudest sound on Earth in recorded history. The British ship Norman Castle was 40 miles from Krakatoa at the time of the explosion. The ship’s captain wrote in his log, “So violent are the explosions that the ear-drums of over half my crew have been shattered.”

  • Gov.’s DWI proposals ignore deeper problems, solutions

    On Dec. 14, the governor announced her DWI proposals for the Legislature, and within days she was apologizing for an employee bash and her own behavior after she committed GWI – governing while intoxicated.
    If you are one of the three people who didn’t hear the recording, you missed a tipsy Susana Martinez haranguing a desk clerk and two police dispatchers. Somebody complained about noise coming from a staffer’s hotel room, where the governor insisted six people were “eating peetzahhhh.”
    After the internet joking subsided, local and national pundits began pronouncing her star fallen.
    Maybe, but we still need to talk about DWI.
    The governor wants legislators to toughen up DWI penalties – adding jail time for certain repeat DWI offenders, expanding habitual-offender laws to include felony DWI offenses, and cracking down on people who lend vehicles to a DWI offender with a suspended or revoked license. She also wants to have volunteers monitor DWI cases in some counties.

  • Homework Diner a solution for low-income schools

    Let’s humiliate the schools a little more, says the state Public Education Department. That’s a great way to motivate and encourage students.
    While this is going on, there’s a bright spot.
    The humiliation: PED has released the “grades” of schools throughout the state, and the grades are a little lower than last year. This, says the department, is because of the standardized PARCC tests that were forced on school districts. Students didn’t do well on the unfamiliar tests, so the test results depressed the evaluations of the schools. All very logical, unless your motive is to give some encouragement to a state that is constantly being beaten up by low rankings.
    Here’s the bright spot.
    A school in Albuquerque came up with a program that empowers kids, brings parents into the education process, makes good use of school facilities, involves teachers and community volunteers in a friendly way, and supports learning, all at the same time. And it provides a free meal.
    The program is called Homework Diner. It started at Manzano Mesa Elementary School, located in a low-income neighborhood in Albuquerque. It has spread to several other schools.

  • 5 ways to be charitable while staying on a budget

    BY NATHANIEL SILLIN
    Practical Money Skills