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Today's Opinions

  • Don't open business later

    Dear Editor,

    Regarding the article by Carol Clark on Roger Brooks’ community presentation: I disagree that local businesses should entertain the idea of opening later, although they may find it profitable to stay open later. For those of us who spent our career arriving at work early, it is difficult to break such an ingrained habit. If I need something, I do not enjoy the choice of going to Española or Santa Fe and returning, before the local merchants open..

    Jon Hicks

    Los Alamos

  • Fried Light - Can the leopard change its spots?

    After a visit from the new apostle of environmentalism, Energy Secretary Steven Chu, Los Alamos is coming to the end of an interlude of environmental celebrations and events. Now may be as good a time as any to think seriously about how the laboratory is positioned for the country’s revived love affair with the planet earth.

    Oddly enough, the case could be made that decades from now Los Alamos National Laboratory will be as well known as a bastion of environmental knowledge and practice as it is both famous and notorious as the birthplace of the atomic bomb.

  • Program worth discussing

    Ruby K’s should get kudos for listening to Roger Brooks who told our community that we need to make some changes.

    One of those was putting some color here – and if you happen to have gone by their restaurant (or take a look on page one)  you’d see the color they added.

    Many of the points Brooks made are on the mark. Years ago when Wal-Mart moved into another state community, another such business guru thanked all the merchants that were open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. for supporting all of the unemployed people in town.

  • But I Digress: At Least We're Better Than Bhutan

    Back in 2003 and 2004, the United States shipped a little spending cash over to the Iraqi government to help “stimulate the economy.” Our C-130 transport planes carried over 360 tons of $100 bills.

    Yeah, you read that correctly ... hundreds of pallets containing over $10 billion thrown at a problem simply because the military said it was necessary to fight their war on terror. Billions of dollars with absolutely no accountability, no insight, no foresight, and no oversight.

  • Help PEEC honor Earth Day

    This week, the Pajarito Environmental Education Center has been busy helping us all recognize Earth  Day.

    And this weekend, the event winds up with a great show and dinner.

    From 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, PEEC will host an Earth Day Festival at their location at 3540 Orange St.

    There will be entertainment, food, a farmers’ market, orienteering and displays of Earth-friendly products and practices.

    You will meet at the high school and take the free Atomic City Transit shuttle to the event. Another Earth-friendly aspect of the day.

  • Even Cancer Survivors Forget Life is Precious

    We all know by now that cancer survivors don’t always show their true emotions, and I’m no better than any other.

    But its Cancer-versary time again and to say I’ve been down of late would be an understatement. But something I heard the other day gave me the sudden jolt I needed to kick myself in the butt!

  • Beware of exuberant optimism

    Dear Editor,

    A long eight years ago, in Washington, D.C., notice was taken of a budget surplus that had arisen. The surplus was quickly eliminated by giving tax cuts to people who didn’t need them. We then launched two wars, one right and one wrong but both expensive, so that we reestablished the usual deficit.

  • A big piece of the past is gone

    Dear Editor,

    In 1949 a group of very courageous people, believing in the future and a future that they hoped would long outlive them, built a town in probably the worst possible location for any town. It took them 20 years to do it, but they left a legacy and a heritage to be cherished and added upon. Now, we celebrate 60 years of Los Alamos and I find it strange indeed that we do so not by adding to the legacy but by policies and devices that would destroy it and remake it to be something wholly different and unrecognizable from what was created.