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Today's Opinions

  • State film subsidies remain an issue

    During the recently completed legislative session, one of the issues that bubbled below the surface was the state’s generous subsidy programs that are designed to attract moviemakers to set up shop in New Mexico.

    New Mexico’s film subsidies – the primary components of which are a 25 percent subsidy for film producers doing business in New Mexico and up to $15 million in interest-free loans – have resulted in some big-budget films being made in the state.

    But the program costs taxpayers approximately $60 million annually.

  • How smart will computers get?

    In recent years the ability of computers has grown dramatically.  Many are predicting that machines (computers) will soon be smarter than people.  How realistic is this?

    If it is a realistic possibility how soon might it happen?

    Smart is a poorly defined term in this context, so let’s start with some clarification.  For humans the concept of IQ (Intelligence Quotient) is well established and numerous kinds of IQ tests have been devised and used.  

  • More on bicycle safety

    Dear Editor,

    Janet Basinger’s recent letter in the Monitor (Apr. 21), discussing bicycling safety, needs further discussion.

  • More strange goings-on in Lincoln County

    By JAY MILLER

    Syndicated Columnist

    SANTA FE -- Recently this column mentioned that Lincoln County seems to have the strangest goings-on of any place in the state. In that column, we talked about their fandangos, which were quite the rage a century ago.

    In fact, fandangos got to be so wild that the state Legislature banned them. To our knowledge, that law has never been repealed but the town of Lincoln, where many fandangos once occurred, has reinstated them, although on a somewhat tamer scale.

  • Don't open business later

    Dear Editor,

    Regarding the article by Carol Clark on Roger Brooks’ community presentation: I disagree that local businesses should entertain the idea of opening later, although they may find it profitable to stay open later. For those of us who spent our career arriving at work early, it is difficult to break such an ingrained habit. If I need something, I do not enjoy the choice of going to Española or Santa Fe and returning, before the local merchants open..

    Jon Hicks

    Los Alamos

  • Fried Light - Can the leopard change its spots?

    After a visit from the new apostle of environmentalism, Energy Secretary Steven Chu, Los Alamos is coming to the end of an interlude of environmental celebrations and events. Now may be as good a time as any to think seriously about how the laboratory is positioned for the country’s revived love affair with the planet earth.

    Oddly enough, the case could be made that decades from now Los Alamos National Laboratory will be as well known as a bastion of environmental knowledge and practice as it is both famous and notorious as the birthplace of the atomic bomb.

  • Program worth discussing

    Ruby K’s should get kudos for listening to Roger Brooks who told our community that we need to make some changes.

    One of those was putting some color here – and if you happen to have gone by their restaurant (or take a look on page one)  you’d see the color they added.

    Many of the points Brooks made are on the mark. Years ago when Wal-Mart moved into another state community, another such business guru thanked all the merchants that were open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. for supporting all of the unemployed people in town.

  • But I Digress: At Least We're Better Than Bhutan

    Back in 2003 and 2004, the United States shipped a little spending cash over to the Iraqi government to help “stimulate the economy.” Our C-130 transport planes carried over 360 tons of $100 bills.

    Yeah, you read that correctly ... hundreds of pallets containing over $10 billion thrown at a problem simply because the military said it was necessary to fight their war on terror. Billions of dollars with absolutely no accountability, no insight, no foresight, and no oversight.