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Today's Opinions

  • BP setting new definition for ‘weasel’

    From the Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary: weasel - noun; a sneaky, untrustworthy or insincere person.

    Our airwaves have lately been inundated with spokesmen who have dusted off their “down-home” accents to tell us all about what BP is doing to mitigate the effects of its record-setting deepwater horizon oil spill in the Gulf of New Mexico.

    Their statements are upbeat, rosy, reassuring and utterly fictitious.

    BP is currently engaged in many underhanded activities.

    They are contributing to university oil drilling research centers.

  • Business on the Border

    A recent Business on the Border luncheon in Las Cruces illustrated that the Mesilla Valley has fared better with job generation than both the national average and New Mexico as a whole — though it’s still behind the peak employment growth numbers of the mid-2000s.

    At that luncheon, Christopher Erickson, Ph.D., from New Mexico State University’s College of Business, said that even though the country seems to be emerging from a staggering 20 months of recession, it will probably take about three years to catch up to pre-recession employment levels.

  • Are VIP porno addicts subject to blackmail?

    Remember the four communist WWII Cambridge University effetes who donated American atomic secrets to the Russians? The latest “Peoples Republic of Cambridge” arrests spotlight “sexy” Russian spies passing “defense articles on the United States Munitions list” to their comrades.

    Russian spies using “false names and deep cover” were sneaking into “policy making circles,” snaring university degrees and recruiting other spies.

  • Demography may be destiny

     Is demography destiny?

     If so, say some experts, states with growing Hispanic populations seem doomed to fail, weighed down with ineffective school systems and abysmal test scores.

    One academic recently predicted that states like New Mexico will become the “Appalachia of the 21st Century.”

    He based his prediction on well-known statistics concerning the dropout and low achievement scores of Hispanic students.  

  • Gary Johnson has presidential timber

    Gary Johnson is looking more like a presidential candidate every day. The former New Mexico governor has now visited 22 states, appeared on a multitude of radio and TV talk shows and was included in the most recent GOP presidential poll.

    That poll was conducted by Public Policy Polling and had five choices: Mike Huckabee, Mitt Romney, Newt Gingrich, Sarah Palin and Gary Johnson.

    Gov. Johnson had the lowest name recognition but still did better against President Barack Obama than the other four did. GOP leaders are beginning to sit up and take note.

  • Keep those incentives

    Job creation has been the Holy Grail for as long as I’ve been writing in New Mexico – 35 years, and one byproduct of our long struggle to spin straw into gold is the economic development incentive.

    We have dozens of tax breaks and gimmees to lure companies. Even in good times they’ve drawn criticism, but now, as the state attempts to balance the books, and candidates cast about for campaign fodder, there are new calls to examine their use and the public’s return on investment.

    It’s a dandy idea, but we’ve heard it before.

  • Fool us once, shame on you

    Being that the Monitor’s editor Garrison Wells and publisher Keven Todd weren’t here for the Boyer fiasco, it is understandable that they could fall for a developer promising pie-in-the-sky and the Monitor blasts it bold, top line, front page.

    Let’s hope that whoever is evaluating these RFP responses for Trinity site is not as gullible this time around. What we learned from the Boyer experience is that developers are willing to say ANYTHING in order to get the land.

  • Saving resources

    It’s difficult to know how to compare enormous disasters with one another.

    What has been unfolding in the Gulf of Mexico is often called the “greatest environmental disaster” we’ve faced as a nation.  

    My mind turned to an earlier environmental disaster we endured for years in the 1930s. That was the Dust Bowl when a combination of drought and our farming practices in the Great Plains launched the top-most layer of the Earth into the sky again and again.