Today's Opinions

  • Burning Our Own Fuels

    The Gulf oil spill has shown us just one of the downsides of petroleum.
    That makes the mind of even a geologist like me turn to several questions about the future.
    Could we Americans grow more of our own fuel – enough to run a number of our cars, trucks and airplanes?
    And, quite importantly, could we do so without displacing food crops like corn?
    Pretty much everybody from all sorts of political persuasions is interested in those issues.

  • Candidates build warchest

    Lt. Gov. Diane Denish spent seven years building a $2 million war chest. It scared all Democratic candidates and the two major Republican possibilities out of the race, giving her what appeared to be an insurmountable lead.
    Then along came Susana Martinez who raised $2 million in the past 10 weeks to basically wipe out her fundraising disadvantage.
    How did she do it? Close to half of it was out-of-state money, mostly from four big donors. Even Bill Richardson would have trouble raising that much that quickly from within the state.

  • Big trucks should be required to use truck route

    We have two key routes open to the public that take traffic to and from town and one is specifically labeled ‘truck route.  
    Yet it seems there are always lots of big, slow trucks that use the 502, annoying at any time but particularly during heavy traffic times like morning rush hour!
    Can’t the county do something to “encourage” trucks to actually use the truck route?
    Maybe prohibit trucks on the 502 between 6-9 a.m. on weekdays and between 3 p.m.-6 p.m. on weekday afternoons?  

    TJ Taub

  • Firefighter union wants dialogue with county council

    I wasn’t surprised to see the county council object, via the Los Alamos Monitor, to our position (Los Alamos Firefighters’ Assoc. - IAFF Local #3279; “Union”) regarding our current conflict. What I was surprised to see was our own Fire Chief, Douglas Tucker, stating that ‘[Los Alamos County] deal[s] in facts and [the Union] deal(s) in emotions.” This couldn’t be farther from the truth.

  • The power of public-private partnerships

    Tucumcari for the first time. Other than a few lawyers’ offices, its lifeless main street was a canyon of vacant storefronts and hollow buildings.
    A Kmart had opened on the outskirts of town, and one business after another abandoned downtown to be close to the action. The only retail was a place that sold Bully Bags, little bags made of bulls’ testicles, and business wasn’t exactly booming.
    Other than the Bully Bags, Tucumcari’s scene was playing out in many small towns.

  • Mud-splattered voters will decide

    During his 1848 run for president, Gen. Zachary Taylor was pilloried as “a military autocrat,” “semi-illiterate,” “a cruel slavemaster,” “greedy” and given to cussing out underlings.

    Old Zach subsequently groused that he had been besmirched by “the vilest slanders of the most unprincipled demagogues this or any other nation was ever cursed with…”

  • Avid hiker can’t give enough praise

    I love Los Alamos! I love the mountains that surround us; folding us in their majestic embrace.
    I love the fresh mountain air and the fluffy white clouds that daily dance across the blue, blue sky.
    I love Central Avenue with the flower pots, groups of people enjoying the company of friends along with a cup of coffee at Starbucks, the colorful trolley stopping to pick up passengers and the chance encounter with an old friend.
    My walker and I stroll east down the way, dropping in here and there to check out what’s for sale or what’s not.

  • School library remarks deemed achingly obvious

    The recent remarks of Secretary of Education Arne Duncan about school libraries reflects his belief that school libraries are important.
    “We recognize the dire straits of tough economic times and the stress the states are under,” he said. “We don’t want people to take a step backwards and there are all kinds of documented studies that show where you have healthy and strong and vibrant libraries with librarians staffing them students do better, they read better, their test scores go up.”