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Today's Opinions

  • Fool us once, shame on you

    Being that the Monitor’s editor Garrison Wells and publisher Keven Todd weren’t here for the Boyer fiasco, it is understandable that they could fall for a developer promising pie-in-the-sky and the Monitor blasts it bold, top line, front page.

    Let’s hope that whoever is evaluating these RFP responses for Trinity site is not as gullible this time around. What we learned from the Boyer experience is that developers are willing to say ANYTHING in order to get the land.

  • Saving resources

    It’s difficult to know how to compare enormous disasters with one another.

    What has been unfolding in the Gulf of Mexico is often called the “greatest environmental disaster” we’ve faced as a nation.  

    My mind turned to an earlier environmental disaster we endured for years in the 1930s. That was the Dust Bowl when a combination of drought and our farming practices in the Great Plains launched the top-most layer of the Earth into the sky again and again.

  • Lions Club volunteer drivers a giving group

     Living alone and no longer able to drive, I was recently faced with the need to go to Santa Fe for medical treatment three days a week for six weeks.

    I was relieved and heartened to learn that the Los Alamos Lions Club maintained a volunteer driver program to meet just such a need and was able to avail myself of that program.

  • Frito Pie dinner, ice cream social a great success

    I want the community to know that the Frito Pie Dinner/Ice Cream Social fundraiser put on by the women of the House of Hope, Vacation Bible School and the Rainbow Trails Day Camp of Trinity on the Hill Episcopal and Bethlehem Lutheran Churches was a resounding success!  

     Thanks go to so many, but first off, thank you to the Monitor (Kirsten Laskey’s articles), KRSN (Nancy Coombs interview) and RSVP at the senior center for their support and getting the information out to our community.  

  • The band played on

    In early June, our minds were filled with visions of the coming summer months. Vacations to plan. Gardens to weed. Garages to clean out. As we soak up what’s left of the summer sun (and rejoice at the monsoons finally arriving), it’s difficult to even think back to June, isn’t it?  Well, let’s give it a shot.

  • Disaster plans essential for small businesses

    Summer is prime disaster season in New Mexico, whether the disaster is a wildfire, flood or tornado. Two years ago saw the Manzano Fire in Estancia, tornadoes in Clovis and flooding in Ruidoso. Three years ago, floods hit Doña Ana County.

    For a small business, closing for just one day due to an unforeseen disaster can often mean huge financial losses — especially at a time when small businesses are investing time and money into creating jobs to lead America’s economic recovery.

  • Building bust

    The daughter of a friend got a great deal on a house recently, buying on a short sale. My friend is happy – her daughter, a single mom, can stretch her budget farther.

    These transactions are good for the buyer but not the seller or the bank and say something about real estate in general. In June, about 25 percent of home sales in the state were of distressed properties – foreclosures and short sales (lender and borrower selling a home for less than the balance owed).

  • Clean up White Rock and be proud again

    Pictures of neglected, debris-infested homes in White Rock could make a 50-page edition for us to browse through.

    But rather than that, how about we all go out, look around at our own homes, spend a  weekend, if need be, (cutting grass/weeds, putting things away or getting rid of them if we have no place to store them, getting dead vehicles sent to vehicle heaven, storing your boats, campers, etc. out of sight to your neighbors.)