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Today's Opinions

  • Interesting and disturbing issues

    Dear Editor,

    As described in a June 27 Los Alamos Monitor news article by Roger Snodgrass the Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval Assessment (LAHDRA) final report, was presented by staff of the United States Centers for Disease Control (US CDC) at a public meeting in the Hilton Hotel at Buffalo Thunder Resort on June 25.

    Much interesting information was conveyed during the approximately two hours alloted to summarizing the report.

  • What makes a town special?

    Dear Editor,

    What makes a town “special?”  Oddly enough it is not the people.  We speak of “the town and its people,” or the “townsfolk,” both of which entail the concept that each, the town and the people of the town, are separate entities. 

    Populations cycle, every 20 years in Los Alamos. People are people everywhere, subject to the various good and questionable aspects of the condition of being a people.

  • Trinity project

    As expected - and predicted - the Boyer Company has finally confirmed what everyone knew, the world and the economy has changed.

    This new – and unfortunate – dynamic has doomed the Trinity project and we are now in a very bad place.

    This is made worse by the fact that those in county government have refused to be honest with us and have not told us of one thing they have done to prepare themselves for this occurrence.

    That is not leadership.

  • New Mexico eyes high-speed rail expansion

    It seems like New Mexico, Colorado and Texas are feeling big these days. And while we understand that Colorado and Texas are doing OK, we are really wondering how little old us is sharing in that wealth.

    See, the three states are applying for federal funds to study the viability of a high-speed rail system in the hopes of putting new life into passenger railroads in the Intermountain West.

    While that may be a good idea, how do we benefit from what is going to be a huge price tag. We are struggling to pay for the glorious RailRunner now.

  • BUT I DIGRESS...Holy Hatchechubbee, Batman!

    By John Pawlak

    Having been in Blue Ball, my wife and I soon found ourselves passing through Intercourse. Naturally, we ended up in Paradise. Okay, if you've ever visited Amish country in Pennsylvania, you know that those are towns in the area. Much like when we found ourselves driving through Dog Face, California, we've always been amused at the amusing and often questionable names given to towns around the country. By the way, Hatchechubbee is not Robin's exclamation for dicing up a fat man. It's a small town in Alabama (population 564).

  • State retirement changes disputed

  • Norsemen and the great crack in the Atlantic

    More than a thousand years ago, my Norse ancestors were busy pillaging Europe. Using Viking long boats (the stealth weapon of the day), we could sneak up the coasts and rivers of civilized areas, plundering and pillaging at will.

     

    But perhaps we were not thoroughly evil souls. After just a couple of bloody centuries, we converted to Christianity, beat our swords into plowshares, and became peasant farmers.

     

  • Standard hang-ups foil urban debate

    People are masters at drawing opposite “facts” from the same state of affairs. An analysis of big cities illustrates how poorly the public forum performs. We see the reasons that public dialogue is so strong a barrier to creating a new idea from parts of differing ideas.

    How do cities work? We see they do. Some work better than others.

    Does a city work if it has good workers and poor leaders? Or do cities work better if they have top-notch leaders and leaden workers? How do things look from where you sit?