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Today's Opinions

  • Malthus' gloomy prediction can be forestalled again

    Thomas Malthus’ “Essay on the Principle of Population” (1798) predicts that population growth, spurred by societal improvements, eventually will outstrip natural resources leading to universal famine and the demise of civilization. It reasons that population growth is exponential, while growth of food production is linear.

  • Signs of life in an economic wasteland

    Last year at this time, we were staring into an economic sinkhole, wondering if it had a bottom. In New Mexico, we’re usually spared the worst of downturns or there’s a delay in its impact, and this time we’ve seen both. Now, as we feel the monster’s tail lash our industries and our job market, it’s a good time to take stock.

    When I say, “First, the bad news,” you can assume there’s some good news.

    Really.

  • The Obama apologists have it wrong

    Myth:  Obama doesn’t want government-run healthcare.  

    Fact: Obama is on tape recorded as saying, “I happen to be a proponent of a single payer universal health care program.  I see no reason why the United States of America, the wealthiest country in the history of the world, spending 14 percent of its Gross National Product on health care, cannot provide basic health insurance to everybody. “

    Gee, sounds like socialized medicine to me. You decide.

    Myth: The current leadership is not pushing us towards socialism.

  • Eliminate redudancy but do the math

    Marita K. Noon either made a serious writing error in her recent Guest Column, “Eliminate redundancy to fix the budget,” or else she needs a substantive remedial course in elementary mathematics.

      She quotes Oil Conservation Director Fesmire as “sputtering,” that “... the OCD annual budget was only about 4 percent of the state’s budget PROBLEMS” (emphasis added).

  • What can we do about climate change?

    Here’s something most of us know: There is a correlation between the Earth’s temperature and the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere. And here’s another measure: CO2 concentrations grew 60 percent faster during the last eight years than in the 1990s.

  • Eliminate redundancy to fix the budget

    If you could eliminate 4 percent of your debt with one pen stroke, you’d want to do that wouldn’t you — especially if it meant removing some redundancy from your expenditures? For example, if you are renting an apartment and it includes free cable Internet access, but you were also paying for DSL through the phone company, you’d quickly cancel your DSL service.

  • School finance makes sense if we use our heads

    There are many places in the U.S wherea the value of education may seem abstract, but in Los Alamos that value is tangible. It can be seen and felt.

    Education built this town and it remains one of the best educated population in the country. To cite a typical example, 60 percent of Los Alamos residents have bachelor’s degrees, compared to 24 percent in the country as a whole, according to the last census.

    Even with hard choices in store for our community’s educational future, Los Alamos is more fortunate than most.

  • The budget meets its Waterloo

    SANTA FE — What will come from the special legislative session that started Saturday? It may be the state’s most important special session ever.

    Gov. Bill Richardson and lawmakers will have to plug a budget hole of some $700 million. That’s a $700 million shortfall that has occurred since last March when the 2009 session ended.  By August, it was up to $400 million. In September, it climbed to $550 million. And now it’s October.