Today's Opinions

  • Don’t Worry? Be Happy?

    Living in White Rock, I’m concerned about what the proposed GRT rollback means for basic services within the county. How will it curtail future capital improvement protect plans?
    We’re assured, “Don’t worry! Be happy!”
    When the County Council requests increases in the GRT, they have to outline exactly how that money is to be spent. Justifying, in detail, the increase to tax payers in Los Alamos is required. Shouldn’t the same scrutiny be paid to any reduction in county revenue?

  • Christmas spirit is alive

    Once again, the community has come out and showed its very generous spirit.
    Last Saturday’s Breakfast with Santa, sponsored by Del Norte Credit Union and the Kiwanis Club, was a huge success, both in donations and numbers of children who came to give their Christmas wish lists to Santa.
    The holiday season is alive and well in Los Alamos.
    We very much appreciate Del Norte’s financial contribution.
    Much food was collected, to be delivered by LA Cares to those in need. Monetary donations will be used for foster children activities.

  • Stressing toward retirement is a dicey proposition

    The Los Angeles Times reported recently on a new study that almost certainly caused a lot of readers to chuckle and say, “Duh.”
    It seems investigators have discovered that among the health benefits people experience following retirement is a marked reduction in mental and physical stress, according to the study published last week in the British Medical Journal.
    Hello? How could it be otherwise? Name a job from which one might retire that doesn’t induce some measure of physical or mental stress, if not a bit of both.  

  • Domenici's plan takes guts

    After years of delivering truckloads of federal dollars to New Mexico, Pete Domenici has returned to an old love – deficit reduction. Lately he and former White House budget director Alice Rivlin stepped up to champion the Bipartisan Policy Center’s plan to reduce the deficit.
    Domenici, Rivlin and their fellow travelers have the luxury of proposing measures their former bases might find disturbing. The plan, 60 percent spending cuts and 40 percent tax increases, would reduce the budget deficit by $5.9 trillion over the next nine years.

  • A poll for modern times

    Months before the 2008 Presidential race began, I read a poll that predicted who would win the election.  At that time, no one had even formally announced their candidacy, and yet the polls raged on.  I think some guy named Paul Reubens was the leading contender. Polling once again besieged us over the months before the 2010 elections and I found myself unplugging the phone in an effort to ward them off.
    Americans are constantly inundated with polls; polls on who will win, polls on who should win, polls on who would leave the country if who wins.  

  • The definition of civil office is open to interpretation

    What a coincidence. On Nov. 2, New Mexico voters overwhelmingly rejected a constitutional amendment that would allow a governor to appoint a legislator to civil office.
    On Nov, 24, Gov.-Elect Susana Martinez appointed Rep. Keith Gardner, the House Republican whip, as her chief of staff.
    I wasn’t being sardonic when I called it a coincidence. New Mexico court decisions for years have given a very narrow interpretation to what constitutes a civil office.

  • Government isn’t all bad

    Sometimes my friends on the right get a little tiresome with the continuing litany that government is bad. That isn’t entirely true. Government does do some good stuff beyond the basic missions of education, health care, public safety and infrastructure.
    Nor is it true that when government does something good, such as cut taxes, all is sweetness and light. Here I’m referring to the current argument from Paul Gessing of the Rio Grande Foundation that the Richardson tax cuts explain New Mexico’s climb in state per capita income ranks the past few years.

  • What happens with muni case could impact local charter

    Is the muni petition “illegal?”  There are those opposed to the petition who certainly would like it to be. George Chandler certainly thinks it is. I disagree.