Today's Opinions

  • Prime example of theatrical outrage and hatred

    The letter equating Planned Parenthood’s agenda to ethnic cleansing is another example of the overblown-promotion-of-outrage-and-hatred that is destroying American civility and has been for most of my adult life.  
    I’m confident readers who want accurate information regarding Planned Parenthood’s agenda, funding and programs for reproductive health can find their Web site and read.  

  • Same story, second verse

    Are New Mexicans about to get the same story: second verse? During Susana Martinez’s year-long quest for the governor’s office, no one talked publicly about the possibility of her being the GOP vice-presidential nominee two years hence.
    Late in the primary campaign, it became very obvious that state and national GOP leaders had pegged her as their favorite.
    Those of us not in the party structure were very surprised to see her crush four other candidates badly at the Republican pre-primary nominating convention in March.

  • Building a more sustainable town

  • Planned parenthood is glaring exception

    Last week I read with interest the story about the Con Alma Foundation, particularly with regard to recipients of the foundation grants. Most of the ones mentioned seem worthy enough and apparently did meet the nonprofit criterion, presumably one of the requirements for the grants. However, there was one glaring exception: a grant of $20,000 to Planned Parenthood.

  • Forget taxes, deficits, debt - it’s time for a family movie or two

    Nothing like Christmas to test our fragile American psyches.
    While times remain hard for millions of us, stores have amped up the gift-giving hype because, well, they’ve been hit by hard times, too. What better way to make up for a hard year than by sending us the message that if we really, really care for someone...kaching! Guilt makes the sales soar, si?

  • Spirits of budgets past

    All this talk about budget cutting conjures up images of Aubrey Dunn Sr. As chairman of the Senate Finance Committee back in the 1970s, he kept a hatchet on the table to remind his committee members – and everyone else – what they were there for.
    I’m imagining two ghosts of budgets past hovering over Roundhouse deliberations – Dunn and the equally no-nonsense John Mershon, once chairman of the Legislative Finance Committee and the House Appropriations Committee. Both hailed from Otero County, both were fiscally conservative Democrats.

  • Hard-fought rules add oil field jobs

      People dearly want a lasting supply of clean air  and water. The answer is pollution control.    
    As more people make and use more stuff, pollution  sources grow to need more controls. The controls add jobs in the pollution  controls industry. The bonus is more of the clean air and water people  want.
    In mid-October, a black headline glared from  the Albuquerque Journal. It read: “Jackpot in the Oil  Patch - State Rules Helped Politically Connected Players.”  

  • New curbs really look worse than old ones

    All summer long, the construction crews have inconvenienced the traffic on Barranca Road to install new curbs and sidewalks. Now they have collected the traffic-hindering pilons and appear to have completed the job. Except, the new curbs look worse than the old ones!