.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • More tax awareness needed in county

    Los Alamos is going over a property tax cliff that will result in a disastrous tax burden on all county homeowners and businesses. However, there are actions we can take to prevent this from happening.

  • When will the schoolhouse boogie?

    Well, the new jailhouse may rock (Los Alamos Monitor, front page headline, Jan. 13), but the old schoolhouse certainly doesn’t. I’m sure the irony in this contrast strikes many of us, especially those involved with children in the county. It’s one of the many reasons why I’m going to vote in favor of the current referendum on behalf of our school system. I want to be part of a community that sends a positive message of support to our students, as well as to our teachers and other school staff.

  • Debate looks like it was manipulated

    The following was not supposed to be an editorial, but recent news events and new understandings would not allow me to remain silent any longer. Recent Monitor articles including “Getting to the Bottom of Global Warming” (Dec. 13, 2009) inspired a response.

  • Balanced approach resembles walking a tightrope

    There’s been some discussion both internally at the Monitor and externally amongst those in the community regarding why the newspaper has declined to print some letters to the editor. The letters in question have come from proponents of the election now underway concerning two education propositions.

  • Mother Nature clobbers us

    Many of us living in the far Western states know what it is to feel the power of seismic waves passing through the Earth. The sharp jolts are unmistakable, and the sense of chaos is terrifying even to those of us who like a thrill.

    A minor earthquake I felt in Berkeley, Calif., still stands out in my mind some 30 years later, and not because it’s one of my favorite memories. My thoughts turned to it as soon as I heard the news from the Eureka, Calif., area, which experienced an offshore earthquake of 6.5 on the Richter scale recently.

  • Safety issues raised red flags

    I could have spoken up about how odd it was to be putting so many people at risk, but I didn’t. I’ll take some blame for that. I’m sorry. Why didn’t I speak up when I noticed that we wanted our youth who ride buses to cross in front of the school bus, but we wanted them to cross behind Atomic City Transit buses? Why didn’t I speak up when I noticed that vehicle drivers must stop for school buses but can whiz past Atomic City Transit (ACT) buses?

  • Response to column on smoking

    I am delighted to read (in “Our kids are on fire,” Monitor, Jan. 15.) that “As a math teacher, (John Pawlak) can safely say that turning a blind eye to the dangers [of smoking] just doesn’t add up.” I wish you could also tell the FDA that refusing to reduce those dangers – by allowing use of e-cigarettes which provide nicotine and flavors without tars and other carcinogens (including radioactivity!) — doesn’t add up either.

  • There are no quick fixes for problems

    To solve our environmental problems, climate change being by far the largest, we need to think about both smaller bites of the problem and the long term. The small bites won’t be baby steps but bold and far-reaching initiatives that each tackle an aspect of the larger problem. And many of our boldest but necessary steps may not bear fruit within our lifetimes.