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Today's Opinions

  • Addressing children's needs

    Los Alamos is a wonderful place for most families. We enjoy great schools and a wide variety of youth/family programs. I am proud our town is a progressive, vibrant community that is generally responsive to the needs of its residents. But there is a gap not yet addressed. Our community has a small, yet significant, part of the population with developmental disabilities. Outside of school, the families who care for those individuals are often on their own. In Los Alamos, there is a lack of comprehensive programs in place to provide support across the spectrum of abilities.

  • Don’t buy commercial property for the Municipal Building location

    Okay, so we are going to have higher property tax. That’s not surprising.

    Now, since this implies that Los Alamos needs more revenue, the Municipal Building selection group seems oblivious to what is going on around them in making some recent decisions.

  • Looking for new ideas about a next generation retail center?

    Looking for new ideas about a next generation retail center?

    Face it, most of us don’t have the foggiest notion about what’s going on in the realm of post-meltdown shopping centers.

    Much less do we know what the odds are that anything is going to work for very long.

    Having been shopping-deprived for most of its existence has been at best a mixed blessing for Los Alamos, but one of the things it has not provided is a well-developed, experienced nose for how to create a vibrant retail environment for the future.

  • Moving Los Alamos forward

    I share the disappointment of most that the route to the full development of the Trinity Site remains uncertain. Some blame Boyer, some the county and council, but all of us need to look a little deeper.

    There have been changes in Los Alamos over the past 15 years that have taken their toll. Better roads to Española and Santa Fe and inexpensive and regularly scheduled public transportation have made it faster and easier to shop outside Los Alamos.

  • But I digress: Can you hear me crashing now?

    I sometimes wonder if scientists have ever computed the density of stupid.

    Lead is fairly dense and yet it is only half as dense as the metal osmium. Platinum, gold and mercury are pretty dense also. Mercury is so dense that lead will float on it.

    But stupid has to be the densest element by far. It never ceases to amaze me how much stupid some people can stuff into such small heads.

    What brought on this rant? Well golly, it could be so many things.

  • History may hold a lesson for tax increasers in New Mexico

    As legislators prepare to face the $433 million monster in the closet, some folks have suggested a tax increase. They should take a lesson from New Mexico history.

  • Health care reform: A moral issue to ponder

    I write my story about healthcare as a physical therapist, who retired after

    32 years in large institutions and private office. Healthcare is a subject close to my heart. My story is long and I ask for your patience to hear my voice.

    I am a graduate of the University of California Medical School. I started my practice first as a staff therapist in a large county hospital, followed by private hospitals and clinics, ending in private solo practice where I provided specialized physical therapy services primarily focusing on pain and stress management and education.

  • PEEC SPEAKS: Doing something big for Earth

    The Plastic Bag Free Los Alamos campaign began with Mrs. Michele Altherr’s  Kinnikinnick Club and an environmental group for elementary-age children who had decided that we wanted to do something big for the Earth.  

    Everyone voiced several ambitious ideas before Mrs. Altherr, the group leader, suggested stopping plastic bag use.  

    At the time none of us in the club had any idea how bad they were for the environment.