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Today's Opinions

  • Already unraveling

    The New Mexico Court of Appeals ruled recently that a certain state employee is entitled to sue the state in district court instead of being restricted to workers’ compensation.

    A friend of mine e-mailed:  “Seems like it unravels the whole (workers’ comp) reform.”

    No, it doesn’t.

    For those who may be alarmed, some explanation:

    First, this case is not that big a deal, except to the parties directly involved.

  • Service sorely lacking at DMV offices

    My recent experience with the Department of Motor Vehicles makes me wonder if they even begin to understand service.

    On July 28 I went in the afternoon to renew a car registration. A sign was posted that stated “system down no registration possible.”

    I returned July 29 in both the morning and the afternoon and the sign was still posted.

    Then July 29 I tried to do an online registration and after 15 minutes and answering several recorded questions I again was told by a recorded voice the system was down.

  • Council needs to decide on Muni building

    As to your article on the muni building on Aug. 4: new joke: How much time and money does it take to build a Municipal Building in Los Alamos?

    Answer: We’ll have to spend another year and more money getting everyone’s opinion on that and then pay an outside agency lots of money to study it for another year and we’ll get back to you.

    People, it’s time to get it done.

    We have the lot cleared, it has space for a building and parking, so it’s time to put up a design and get it built.

  • Dullest job in town

    Lt. Gov. Diane Denish is getting tied so closely to Gov. Bill Richardson that one might think Denish is Richardson’s last name.

    The Richardson-Denish or Richardson/Denish administration is being blamed for the ills of the past seven and a half years, thereby making the lieutenant governor equally responsible or at least a knowing accomplice in all the governor’s actions.

  • BP setting new definition for ‘weasel’

    From the Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary: weasel - noun; a sneaky, untrustworthy or insincere person.

    Our airwaves have lately been inundated with spokesmen who have dusted off their “down-home” accents to tell us all about what BP is doing to mitigate the effects of its record-setting deepwater horizon oil spill in the Gulf of New Mexico.

    Their statements are upbeat, rosy, reassuring and utterly fictitious.

    BP is currently engaged in many underhanded activities.

    They are contributing to university oil drilling research centers.

  • Business on the Border

    A recent Business on the Border luncheon in Las Cruces illustrated that the Mesilla Valley has fared better with job generation than both the national average and New Mexico as a whole — though it’s still behind the peak employment growth numbers of the mid-2000s.

    At that luncheon, Christopher Erickson, Ph.D., from New Mexico State University’s College of Business, said that even though the country seems to be emerging from a staggering 20 months of recession, it will probably take about three years to catch up to pre-recession employment levels.

  • Are VIP porno addicts subject to blackmail?

    Remember the four communist WWII Cambridge University effetes who donated American atomic secrets to the Russians? The latest “Peoples Republic of Cambridge” arrests spotlight “sexy” Russian spies passing “defense articles on the United States Munitions list” to their comrades.

    Russian spies using “false names and deep cover” were sneaking into “policy making circles,” snaring university degrees and recruiting other spies.

  • Demography may be destiny

     Is demography destiny?

     If so, say some experts, states with growing Hispanic populations seem doomed to fail, weighed down with ineffective school systems and abysmal test scores.

    One academic recently predicted that states like New Mexico will become the “Appalachia of the 21st Century.”

    He based his prediction on well-known statistics concerning the dropout and low achievement scores of Hispanic students.