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Today's Opinions

  • Public sector continues winning

    The central political battle of our time is between the public sector, public sector unions in particular, and the private sector.

    The battle is over “who defines the work and institutions that make a nation thrive and grow,” in the elegant words of columnist Daniel Henninger of the Wall Street Journal. Easterners seem unhappy with the public sector dominance. Scott Brown’s Senate victory in Massachusetts is the prime example.

    New Mexico’s public sector continues winning.

  • Temporary hikes tax belief

    Governor Richardson seems adamant in asserting that whatever tax hikes he pushes through during the 2010 legislative session will be “temporary.” This promise from a lame-duck governor is ridiculous on its face and is an impossible promise for him to keep. Since this is his final legislative session in office, he won’t even be around to determine whether the hikes he enacts will be temporary or not.

  • Economic development beyond the stardust

    SANTA FE  — Gov. Bill Richardson’s economic development initiatives continue to be his top priorities for projects not to be cut in this legislative session.

    Richardson calls them the bold initiatives of which he is proudest about accomplishing during his seven years in office. These are the initiatives that have brought New Mexico into the 21st century, he tells us.

    These initiatives have been boldly promoted but their successes in terms of hard numbers are something lawmakers are going to want to see before this legislative session is over.

  • Thumbs down on taxes

    Recently the Monitor has published two interesting articles concerning the upcoming election with respect to the UNM-LA question and LAPS bond election.

    One concerns the writer-perceived perception that many had a “misconception that Los Alamos schools are wealthy.” Furthermore that the recent 32 percent tax increases should not influence the current bond vote.

  • Vote yes for public schools referendum

    Please allow our schools to pay for maintenance and equipment by voting “yes” on the referendum ballot that has been maailed to county residents

    New Mexico law specifies how school funding works:

    • State funding is used to cover salaries (operational expenses).

    • Bond funding, through local taxes, is for buildings/property (capital projects).

    • Referendum funding, through local taxes, is for building repair, maintenance, equipment replacement and some athletic items (projects under $200,000).

  • The cost of education

    Editor’s note: The Monitor has received a number of letters in support of the proposed UNM-LA mil levy and the LAPS referendum, more than we can publish. This supporting statement  from Mike Wismer, chair of the Los Alamos County Council and former member of the UNM-LA Advisory Boar, is representative of many the letters in support of UNM-LA. We will continue to publish perspectives on both issues as space and balance permit.

  • Engaging voters, engaging their minds

    According to a survey prepared for Los Alamos County during the first two weeks of December, the UNM-LA bond issue is likely to fail, while the LA Public Schools referendum is likely to pass.

    The two questions are now in the hands of voters.

    The survey by Southwest Planning and Marketing of Santa Fe is based on 408 telephone interviews with registered Los Alamos voters and was designed to test their awareness of the UNM-LA and Los Alamos Public Schools bond issues and, more generally, their attitudes about bond issues and education in Los Alamos.

  • Art of taxation: Exploring the pain threshold

    A Frenchman once said the art of tax collection is plucking the goose just below the threshold of greatest hissing.

    Legislators and the governor will explore that threshold during this 30-day session as they attempt to dam the flow of red ink. Nobody’s pretending this will be easy, but it’s encouraging that the governor and lawmakers begin the process pretty close together with a slate of proposed spending cuts and tax increases.