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Today's Opinions

  • Get on board the Constitution

    I am displeased with the overwhelmingly unconstitutional voting record of New Mexico’s entire congressional delegation.

    To judge for yourself and to keep apprised, please allow me to recommend The New American Magazine’s Freedom Index, available at www.thenewamerican.com. This invaluable resource summarizes congressional voting records and provides concise explanations regarding the constitutionality of each vote. Other useful websites are www.campaignforliberty.com and www.oathkeepers.org.

  • Support UNM-LA mil levy

     I’m writing to you in support of the mil levy vote for the University of New Mexico Los Alamos branch.  Surprisingly enough, many of our town residents don’t realize that there’s a college branch right here.  We have some of the best faculty that you’ll find anywhere, including our main campus, and our class sizes are small enough that our students enjoy specialized attention from the instructors.  Although the majority of our degrees are two-year degrees, we also offer a full four-year computer science degree.  We are also one of the first

  • Ten tough years among the fools

    For the record, if you’re reading this right now, chances are you’ve successfully navigated through the wonders of the 21st century’s first decade.

    Perhaps you even have some water left from the Y2K scare. In fact, is there a better place to begin a reflection on the past 10 years than at the very beginning – or, say, the 12 months before?

  • Models of reconciliation in our midst

    The year and decade ended for me in an awesome experience of reconciliation in two outdoor ritual folk plays in Alcalde, just north of San Juan Pueblo, on Dec. 27.

    The Matachines dance and “Los Comanches” play were performed back- to-back in the brilliant winter sunshine on the icy ground of the Camino Real, below the snowy peaks of the Sangre de Cristos.  

    The folk plays reminded us how badly our new decade needs respectful truces. Democrats and Republicans, Christians, Jews, and Muslims, modernists and traditionalists, badly need to reconcile.

  • Let science make the call on climate

    The letter by Mark A. Robinson “Climate change is liberal hot air,” Dec. 31, 2009, is a good example of what’s bothering people about this issue. It attacks the idea of human-caused warming not from a scientific point but from a political/economic one. Indeed most objections to this idea are made because it’s thought that this is some political ploy that’s simply going to cost too much to do anything about. This is understandable since there are a fair number of supporters of the idea who are liberal and many against it who are conservative.

  • NMED not up to the task

    The New Mexico Environment Department’s (NMED) recent public venting at LANL over radionuclide reporting in groundwater appears to be another subterfuge at hiding its own inadequacies in regulation.  NMED clearly has no statutory authority to regulate radionuclides at DOE facilities.  LANL provides large amounts of information to NMED as a courtesy.  Environmental surveillance reports dating back to 1970 and many other reports are full of data on ground and surface water and are publicly available.  For many years there were quarterly public meetings to talk about

  • LEDs score in proficiency, not political points

    Words take on a cultural aura. In Spanish, all nouns have a gender. Everything is either masculine or feminine, but neither rhyme nor reason can tell which.

    Would you guess the Spanish word for “necktie” is male or female? Even though neckties are in the men’s wear department, the word for necktie is “la corbata,” clearly feminine. You will do no better at guessing the gender of Spanish words for dress, book or window (masculine, masculine, feminine).

  • Real compromise requires an attitude adjustment

    So we end the year with a climate “accord” nobody likes. And health care reform limped out of Congress with critics baying on all sides. When the Legislature convenes to contend with the state’s red ink, we’ll probably see more controversial compromises, just as we did in the special session.

    Which makes me think we don’t know how to compromise anymore. I’m not sure we even know what a compromise is.

    I’ve seen the process in two settings – as a mediator and as an observer at New Mexico First’s Town Hall Meetings.