Today's Opinions

  • Don’t forget past experiences

    How quickly we forget! Remember when Los Alamos was evacuated because of fire danger? Traffic ran rather smoothly to get us off the main hill area.
    Please don’t tell me that a two-lane Trinity Drive with one to five roundabouts is going to ease traffic during our morning, noon and evening rushes or when evacuating for another unexpected event.
    With Central Avenue now a congested area — enough is enough.

    Maxine Joppa
    Los Alamos

  • Give us four lane road

    Anthony Amsden expressed himself very well in his letter in the Los Alamos Monitor on April 17, in which he said, “Leave Trinity at 4 Lanes.”  I have watched Anthony over the years, and recognize that he is a brilliant scientist.  The Transportation Board should pay careful attention to his reasoning.

  • Plea to the council

    Let me get this straight. The county is all about supporting small businesses in Los Alamos. They want this grand municipal building to attract people to live in Los Alamos.
    So, they want Los Alamos to grow, right?  They are developing Trinity Site to attract more businesses so people won’t have to shop off the hill, right? They want to redo Trinity so it’s more pleasing to the eye. They want to reduce it to two lanes with roundabouts.
    First of all, it is a business loop for a state highway. Second, it is a main artery through town providing access to businesses. Central already gets backed up since the “reconstruction” was done to make it look “nice.”  

  • The language of deficit reduction

    A couple of weeks ago, after Wisconsin Republican Congressman Paul Ryan, chairman of the House Budget Committee, unveiled the GOP’s budget proposal for fiscal year 2012, New Mexico’s 3rd District Democratic Congressman Ben Ray Lujan took to the House floor with some thoughts on Ryan’s offering.
    To characterize Ryan’s budget plan as controversial is to understate the case. Still, even some of the staunchest critics--in Congress, in the media and beyond—have deigned to tip their hats to the Budget Committee chairman for his ambitious, if unrelentingly doctrinaire, approach to whittling federal spending by $4 trillion over the next ten years.

  • Martinez gets mixed grades

    Gov. Susana Martinez entered a room packed with Navajo leaders from New Mexico, her first such meeting.
    As each person spoke about needs, the governor took notes. She listened, she was gracious, and her visitors left feeling they were heard.
    I give the new governor an A for finessing the meeting alone, with no underling to take notes. Imagine her male predecessors doing that!
    Martinez has gotten through her first 100 days with a few wins, a few losses and a few questionable decisions.
    Her report card would include most of the letters, plus “needs improvement.”
    Let’s begin with the A’s. While Martinez wasn’t a commanding presence during her first legislative session, her message certainly was.

  • The glue that binds us

    We are a society of laws. We have to be. Our laws provide the glue holding us together. Laws are just the beginning. The institutions of society are the rest.
    By institutions I mean enforcement of the laws, respect for the central place of private property, effective education and a working health care system.
    On the latter, I spent time recently with my mother completing an 82-page admissions document required by the facility where she is receiving care. The waste in this document boggles the mind.
    My topics today, however, are laws that work with leavening from the delightfully named “stupid factor.”
    Abandoned mines offer continuing application of the stupid factor, especially when young men and alcohol are around.

  • Local banter out does Middle East experience

    I have just returned from three weeks in the Middle East (Egypt and Israel). Not one problem — no gun shots nor riots. Peaceful and quiet; unlike the banter over the Trinity Drive reconstruct I left in Los Alamos!
    The Egyptians were especially happy to see us and treated us like kings and queens — well, at least like the elite. Loved the way they turn three-lane highways into seven lane ones with cars going every which way when the traffic load gets heavy. Looked like they were braiding hair. Made me think of a congested two-lane Trinity Drive.
    Since I was gone, I did not attend the April 7 meeting on the Trinity Drive reconstruct. Here are a few comments I would have made.

  • N.M. 502 needs four lanes

    The two lane Trinity Drive preferred option presented by the MIG  consultants at the recent Transportation Board meeting should be ejected by our county councilors as being both unworkable in practice and way too expensive for even a town so well funded as Los  Alamos.
    Imagine the daily rush hour traffic if Trinity is narrowed down to only two lanes. According to the official traffic measurements, which were done for this study, there are routinely peak traffic rates of 1,500 vehicles/hr with some weekdays seeing 1,900 vehicles/hr during lunch hour.
    Most of this traffic is westbound in the morning and  eastbound in the afternoon rush hours while at lunch hour the traffic is  pretty evenly divided between east and west.