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Today's Opinions

  • Seven quick comments

    • What is behind this dreadful traffic-circle idea? Leave Trinity Drive alone.
    •The new pavements on the truck route and parts of Rover Boulevard are beautifully done: such skill and care!
    •Again, we thank the folks in the Los Alamos Fire Department, the Los Alamos Police Department and all who serve and protect.
    •The dog-poo-cleanup stations on walking paths in Pajarito Acres are really appreciated: thanks much.
    • The wonderful, huge “gear collage” attached to the new Transfer (eco) Building is terrific: it moves, too.
    •The flower baskets on Central Avenue are really lovely: the trees are too dry.
    •Please reread #1.

    Jody Shepard
    Los Alamos

  • Let's stop going around in circles

    While attending a local function, I noticed quite a number of people gathered around wanting to sign a petition. I was pleased for the opportunity to participate myself, when I heard it was in opposition to the proposed “Traffic Circles/Roundabouts” on Trinity Drive.
    I personally did not hear anyone coming forward with praise for their excellent past experiences with traffic circles. At that function and since however, I have heard and read numerous astute insights into why “If It Ain’t Broke Don’t Fix It” illustrated.
    I then began thinking back myself to when I grew up in southern California and found myself and my car pool buddy commuting from the South Bay Area to Long Beach State College.

  • Some folks always seem to land on their feet

    Is the media piling on Jerome Block, Jr. and the Public Regulation Commission? That’s what PRC commissioner Ben Hall says. He notes that in America people are presumed innocent until proven guilty.
    Granted, a day seldom goes by without a new charge against Block making headlines. First I will note that all media are very careful to use words like alleged, charged and faces when talking about accused lawbreakers. It allows company lawyers to sleep better at night.
    There has been one recent exception. For a brief period between jobs, former state public safety chief Darren White was the crime reporter for an Albuquerque television channel.

  • Getting involved matters

    Professionals sometimes make a critical mistake in their careers: they neglect to join their industry associations.
    After investing time and money in a university education or training program, they disregard the value of continued education, advocacy and other assistance that associations provide.
    With so much at stake in these difficult times, why would anyone want to go it alone?
    Associations were created by people who saw the need for banding together to fight for common values and interests affecting their industry.
    While this is still the primary reason most people join, modern associations provide much more than they did in their early days.
    Advocacy. For some, this is the most important service an association provides.

  • Earth's fragile surface

    My friend Sharon Rogers lives in suburban Virginia.
    On Tuesday she and her husband were leaving their house to go to a late lunch when she felt something like thunder sweeping over the neighborhood.
    “I thought it was a military jet going over too low,” she told me on the telephone. “I said to myself, ‘It’s another damn general being buried in Arlington.’”
     It was no jet, but a Richter 5.9 earthquake that struck near Mineral, VA.
    Why, you may ask, should there have been an earthquake in what is supposed to be the seismically placid East Coast?
    Allow me to answer by way of an analogy.

  • Find your voice

    I would like to recount for you my most recent medical circumstances that prompted me to write this letter, so here goes ... I started feeling like I was coming down with something on Sunday, Aug. 7 … nothing dramatic, just tired, and headachy. I came to work on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday still felling a little puny.
    Wednesday just before 5 p.m. I really started to feel bad, added to my already feeling of puny, I developed a severe pain going from my chest to my back — straight through.
    Thursday morning I awoke to pain from the top of my head to soles of my feet. I decided to take my temperature and it registered 101.7.

  • Tourism secretary had a plan

    In July as the state’s forests, along with its tourism season, seemed to be going up in smoke, the industry anxiously awaited a move from Santa Fe to counter bad publicity.
    They wondered aloud if Tourism Secretary Monique Jacobson had a game plan.
    She did. Rather than calling more attention to the fires, she took another approach – the “Catch the Kid” campaign.
    Don’t expect the same old thing from Jacobson, a home-grown marketer hired away from Quaker Oats to breathe life into tourism promotion. She grew up in the business – her father’s a hotelier in Taos Ski Valley – and honed her skills out of state. Now she’s back with energy, ideas and infectious enthusiasm.

  • Texas continues to bully New Mexico

    Texas has done it to us again. The state has enjoyed bullying us ever since it came into existence. This time it involves playing by different rules for the collection on drought insurance.
    Last year, as the effects of drought became very obvious, the U.S. Department of Agriculture began touting a new drought insurance policy. Ranchers in New Mexico and Texas jumped at the opportunity.
    Sure enough, both states are experiencing the worst droughts in recorded history. Texas ranchers have received $65 million in payments. New Mexico ranchers have received $2,000 for the $1.5 million they paid in premiums.