Today's Opinions

  • Watch those cigarettes

    I want to say that on Mother’s Day, May 8, at approximately 1 p.m., while standing in my front yard, I witnessed a gentleman in a red jeep leaving the Pueblo Drive area of the Denver Steels throw a cigarette out his window.
    The cigarette hit the street and blew on to my dry grassy yard. It could have become a disaster had I not seen him do this.
    Many of us in the neighborhood could be homeless right now because of that irresponsible act. If people are going to smoke, they should do so with respect for the community around them and use an ashtray or not smoke while driving.
    With the 11-year anniversary of the Cerro Grande Fire upon us, people should be extra vigilant to prevent fires.

    Dana Wouster
    Los Alamos

  • Efficiency in regulations

    A lack of sturdy regulation is a large, worsening problem for the nation’s economy in all its aspects.
    Today’s column outlines sorely needed advances of large scope. Ensuing columns will amplify key features. Judge the whole.
    Department of Regulatory Science & Technology tools move us faster than slogans.                                                          

  • What’s old seems new again

    Without actually debating the issue head on, the concept of federalism is back as a central focus of American political debates.
    Federalism, at least as conceived by the Founding Fathers in the Constitution, meant that the central government in Washington had a few, strictly-limited powers, but that an overwhelming majority of what was to be done was to be left to the states and people.
    The belief that Washington’s powers were few and limited was so important to the Founders that two separate amendments essentially re-stated this.

  • Abdominal pain in kids is common

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints among school aged kids, whether it comes to the doctor’s attention or not. It is estimated in the U.S. to account for 5 percent of all unscheduled pediatrician office visits.
    It is somewhat more common in girls, kids aged 4-6 and early adolescence and children of single parents.
    In addressing this issue, it is helpful to classify the pain as chronic or acute. By definition, chronic abdominal pain means three or more episodes of abdominal pain over a three month period. In clinically practical terms, pain that lasts more than one to two months can also be classified as chronic.

  • Just A Wag 05-06-11

    Local teenage bullies...
    Parents are reporting that students at the middle school have launched intimidating and humiliating Facebook chatter against specific peers.
    Word is that the parents are reaching the breaking point and are about ready to go public.

    Send us your wags
    “Just a wag” features initial snippets of news heard around town.  The wags may grow to larger stories or simply remain snippets, either way this is meant to spark interest and provide food for thought. E-mail wags to lanews@lamonitor.com.

  • Gary runs for president

    On April 21, Gary Johnson stood in front of the New Hampshire State House in Concord and announced his candidacy for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination.
    Afterwards, the online newspaper “Slate” noted, “Only 14 percent of Republicans have the faintest idea of who he is.”
    Still later that evening, ABC News summed up the former New Mexico governor’s quest as, at best, “a long-shot bid for the White House.”
    Johnson would probably agree with that assessment, but he also remembers how virtually every political soothsayer in his own home state was saying much the same thing in 1994 after he announced his candidacy for the GOP gubernatorial nomination that year.

  • Gag Gag me with a spoon

    Civilization is doomed. We don’t have a prayer. Let’s just pack it up, give the planet back to the jellyfish and trilobites, and admit that the human race is headed for a sad and dismal end.
    Yeah, I know. An apocalyptic aphorism might not be the best way to start a column. But sometimes you just want to get to the punch line.
    Our children are growing up in a world that praises the putrid and idolizes the idiots. We worship the worthless, value the vulgar, deify the disgusting, and exalt the egregious.
    But with so many vile incarnations of mildewed dishrags in our society, you’d be hard pressed to guess which one I’m talking about.

  • Congress has moral obligation



    As Washington engages in a heated political debate about the federal deficit, both parties agree that spending should be cut and no program seems entirely safe from the budget-slashing ax. 

    But history tells us that congress often makes mistakes during periods of indiscriminate budget-cutting. And this time, the consequences could be tragic for our soldiers still in harm’s way.