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Today's Opinions

  • Dancing with death

    Once I had a case of influenza so bad I missed close to a month of graduate school.  I ran a fever and coughed until it felt like my whole world was turned upside down.
    Because I’m a geologist, not a medical doctor, I nicknamed that bout of illness “the plague.”  But what I experienced was a walk in the park compared to the real McCoy.
    The sheer virulent power of plague is a tale of human history that’s a warning ringing across the centuries. But the story takes its most interesting turn recently, as science has been unraveling more and more mysteries of the Black Death.
    The first widespread outbreak of the plague we know about started in 541 A.D.  

  • Just A Wag 09-09-11

    Hometown pride

    Rumor has it that Dr. Greg Schneider has composed an original piece of music, in commemoration of Sept. 11.
    Schneider’s music will be performed at events in Pennsylvania, New York, Washington, D.C. and New Mexico.

    Grant recipients

    We hear that a State Farm grant to benefit Los Alamos Middle School has been awarded to the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board, Los Alamos Public Schools and Assets In Action.
    Send us your wags
    “Just a wag” features initial snippets of news heard around town.  The wags may grow to larger stories or simply remain snippets, either way this is meant to spark interest and provide food for thought.
    E-mail wags to lanews@lamonitor.com.

  • Saluting Citizenship Day

    Once a year, we stop arguing about immigration, abortion, taxing the rich, drilling national reserves, and other typical dinner conversations that usually result in throwing food and dishes at each other.
    Once a year, we turn our eyes towards those stars and stripes waving in the distance, and we remember why we’re able to argue over these things.  We have the freedom to disagree.
    Sept. 17 is “Constitution Day,” a day set aside by the U.S. Department of Education to observe and honor the history of our Constitution.  
    On Sept. 17, 1787, the final draft of the Constitution was sent to Congress. Nine months later, (June 21, 1788,) Congress ratified it. So was our country “born” on 9/17/87 or 6/21/88?  

  • Let's get it all straight

    In reference to a story in the Los Alamos Monitor in which the following statement was published, “George Chandler also disputed Gavron’s claim that Trinity had less accidents than other roads.”
    I (Gavron) did not “claim” anything.  I quoted openly published State of New Mexico Highway Department statistics that are freely available on the web.   
    We should rely on hard numbers and not on anecdotal evidence when we decide what is best for our town.
    The numbers clearly show that Trinity Drive is less dangerous than several other roads in our community.

    Victor Gavron
    Los Alamos

     

  • Roundabouts supposed to be wonderland of puppies and butterflies

    Ah, the truth about the traffic circles debate finally emerges.  As a reminder, this all began when the Transportation Board announced that they had a perfect solution to traffic on Trinity Drive — traffic circles.
    Despite the overwhelming skepticism by motorists that traffic circles would work on Trinity, the Transportation Board claimed that traffic would in fact move better with traffic circles than with those pesky traffic lights.
    They knew this to be true because they had hired a landscaping firm that found some software that real traffic engineers use to model these circles.  

  • Keep focus on efficiency

    Two newspaper essays I wrote this spring broached the idea of working on the regulatory process to boost its efficiency. The early responses are in.
    Support is unanimous in all sectors and comes in three colors – white, red and black.  
    White-colored support says the idea is “right on target.” Red support says, “I can tell real horror stories about inefficient regulation.”
    The black support says, “the worst of (business, government) will wreck the good idea from the start.”
    No one thinks the process is as efficient as is.

  • Rep. Jim Hall reports on Special Session

    We are now a few days into the Special Legislative Session.  Before things get really busy, I would like to update citizens of House District 43 on my experience to date and first impression as a new legislator.

  • The battle heats up

    Gov. Susana Martinez has been hauled into court again, although this time it’s Martinez’s Taxation and Revenue Secretary Demesia Padilla who is targeted in a case filed in Santa Fe state district court.
    The suit cites Padilla for implementing the governor’s directive to dispatch some 10,000 letters seeking proof of residency from New Mexico licensed drivers presumed to be illegal immigrants.
    Such licenses may be legally obtained by foreign nationals in New Mexico under a state law passed in 2003.
    Martinez doesn’t like that law and promised to have it repealed during her campaign last year.