.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Just A Wag 09-30-11

    Facing one’s fifth decade with grace

    Rumor has it that a certain director of a local organization has come to the end of her 40s on Thursday — turning old enough to join her very own program.

    Send us your wags

    “Just a wag” features initial snippets of news heard around town. 
    The wags may grow to larger stories or simply remain snippets, either way this is meant to spark interest and provide food for thought.
    E-mail wags to lanews@lamonitor.com.

  • Breeding better wheat

    I spent this past summer trudging through six-mile treks each weekend with two good friends.
    We walked along the edge of wheat fields outside of town.
    My friends and I qualify as middle-aged ladies, so the walks counted as significant exercise — sad but true.
    One of the interesting things about the walks was simply observing the growth and ripening of the wheat fields by which we passed.
    We depend on wheat for bread, pasta, animal feed, noodles and perhaps most importantly — fresh-baked cinnamon rolls.
    Watching a whole field of wheat grow up, turn from green to gold, and finally be harvested is a magical production that never grows old, at least for us hayseeds.

  • John Pawlak: It does make you think

    I’ve always liked miracles. They come in so many different sizes and flavors, you get to take your choice of favorites from a virtual warehouse ranging from the surprising to the truly ridiculous.  
    And of course, knowing me, it shouldn’t be a surprise that I’m not particularly interested in writing about the surprising. And so let’s get ridiculous!
    First of all, we should wash away any criticism of miracles and admit that we all like them. Miracles are a staple of life. There’s Miracle Whip (it’s a miracle if you can figure out what this stuff is.)

  • A look below the surface

    What are we going to do about this health care system? Or this polyglot of programs we have instead of a system?
    That’s one of America’s big questions, of course.
    At the recent Domenici Institute conference in Las Cruces, Dr. Mario Molina of Molina Healthcare presented some sobering statistics that add focus to the issue.
    Molina talked about a category of people called “dual eligibles.”
    We have heard that people in their last months of life are the most expensive patients. Dual eligibles are next.
    Dual eligibles are people enrolled in both Medicare and Medicaid.
    They qualify for Medicare either by age or due to a qualifying disability and for Medicaid because of low income.

  • Standing against AT&T and Mobile merger

    Access to sufficient and affordable communication choices shape our ability to share and connect to information, resources and culture.
    At Young Women United, we have been incredibly concerned about the negative impacts an AT&T/T-Mobile merger would have on young women of color and all our communities.
    We applaud the Department of Justice for filing a lawsuit to halt this takeover, and calling the potential merger out for what it really is: an anti-competitive move that would raise prices and lessen quality of services for U.S. consumers, while putting more money in the pockets of gigantic corporations.

  • Snapshots of NM news

    Ours is a big state. Few others can boast population centers 492 miles apart, the distance between Farmington and Hobbs.
    Life being life, it’s easy to forget that the other corners of the state exist, much less take the time to pay attention to them.
    A few years ago, when doing Capitol Report New Mexico, I would survey community newspaper websites, taking a snapshot of local events. Recently I did the same survey. Sunday is the best day.
    In Columbus, businessman Philip Skinner wants a separate economic development group for the village.
    Southern Luna County gets too little attention from the group in Deming, Skinner says. (Deming Headlight, Sept. 16.)

  • Education's agonizing 'Catch 22'

    Education has made a big difference in the lives of many of us in Los Alamos. Funding reductions have forced our school district to make serious cuts in their operational budget, the portion that pays teachers’ salaries and other day to day costs.  
    State law does not allow us to tax ourselves to fund operational costs.  
    Over the past few years the amount available for professional development has shrunk by over $150,000.  Our teachers have not had a pay raise for four years.  
    These cuts will affect our children’s education and their future and the ability of Los Alamos National Laboratory to attract the best and brightest.

  • Plea to Demo Garden thieves

    An open letter to the people picking the vegetables from the downtown Demo Garden:
    All spring and summer, several dedicated children, led by Marion Goode and sponsored by 4H, took an empty piece of the Demo Garden, on the corner of  Oppenheimer and Central Avenue, and turned it into a vibrant vegetable garden.  
    In  doing this project, they learned a lot, beautified the town, and earned their level 1 certificate from the National Junior Master Gardener Program.
    Now as their vegetables are coming ripe — someone is stealing their produce. In early September, they found so many prized and nurtured items stolen, that it was difficult for them to pick sufficient produce to enter into the New Mexico State Fair.