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Today's Opinions

  • Entrepreneurs: Beware of the valley of death

    Business owners know it takes money to make money; production expenses must be paid before products are sold and revenue is received.
    Entrepreneurs with a business idea have an even greater need for up-front cash.
    They must have enough capital to cover negative cash flow in the early months or years of new business creation and growth.
    Without adequate initial investment, they risk falling into the so-called valley of death – the deep and wide gulf that separates a company’s need for capital and investors’ willingness to supply it.
    Also known as the grand canyon of capital need vs. availability, the valley can be shallow or deep depending on the amount of money needed to develop the idea or product.

  • They didn’t actually ask me but...

    Read my lips: No new pledges. How’s that for a campaign slogan?
    The recent debate over the federal debt limit showed millions of Americans just how dysfunctional our federal leadership has become, if they needed another demonstration.
    Since the 2012 Congressional election season has already begun, it’s not too early to talk about what we really want from our representatives in Congress.
    New Mexico has only three seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, two of which have incumbent advantages, and one Senate seat on the ballot next year.

  • New Hispanic leader needed

    Redistricting never turns out how you think it will, warned Michael Davis, vice president of political programs for the Washington D.C.-based Business and Industry PAC.
    One demographic could trump lines drawn on a map, here and across the nation – immigration reform.
    “Republicans are in trouble with Hispanics,” Davis said, and in the last five years, Hispanics have outpaced every other group in population growth – by large margins. “Every year for the next 20 years, there will be 500,000 new Hispanic voters turning 18. It will play a large, deciding vote in elections.”  
    In New Mexico that increase was 16 percent and in Texas, 20 percent. Davis predicts Texas will be a blue state by 2020.

  • Letters to the editor 8-14-11

     

    As the seasonal fires die out, there is now time to ask: “Why?”  

    Why did another round of fires scar the southwest, causing untold loss and destruction of invaluable habitat?

    The answer is simple yet disturbing: our public lands have not been well managed.

  • Not much urgency seen

     

       

    Seven months after his nomination as Economic Development Secretary, four months after his boss and state lawmakers failed to make jobs a priority in the legislative session, and one month after the state posted the first pathetic job growth after 32 straight months of losses, Jon Barela is traveling the state to hold job creation meetings.

  • NCRTD's hum of change

     

       

    Anthony Mortillaro walked into the North Central Regional Transit district (“NCRTD”) May 8, 2011 and wheels started turning. Appointed Interim Executive Director after Josette Lucero retired from the NCRTD at the end of April; he immediately began to review policies and procedures and took time to visit with each member of the administrative staff.

  • Alzheimer's is tough on caregivers

    No doubt about it: when someone you love is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or some other cause of dementia, it’s a crushing blow.
    Not only must you face the fact that your loved one has a degenerative and ultimately fatal condition, you also have to deal with a plethora of increasingly strange behaviors. Mother tells the same story 50 times a day and wanders the house all night, or dad compulsively loads and then unloads the dishwasher.
    Or your devoted spouse of 30 years is suddenly convinced you’re cheating on him with the next-door neighbor.

  • A new day of infamy

    The United States has endured and suffered through days of triumph and tragedy. Among the latter have been the stock market crashes of Sept. 28-29, 1929; Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941; John Kennedy’s assassination on Nov. 22, 1963; and, of course, Sept. 11, 2001, which needs no elaboration.
    Joining that infamous collection will be Aug. 2, 2011.
    On that day, Congress passed and U.S. President Barack Obama signed into law legislation raising the debt ceiling and borrowing capacity of the United States while making about $1 trillion of spending cuts to its already swollen deficit-ridden budget.