Today's Opinions

  • Actions symptomatic of impotence felt by many in community

    It is ironic that Friday’s front page headlines carried two items of immense importance where the more important received less attention.
    In the more important headline, “Council drafts a new vision statement,” reporter Kirsten Laskey listed the proposed vision statement along with10 new statement goals. Not addressed in either the vision statement or the 10 goals was any critical concern for the reasons behind the other headline item, “Weapons cache seized.”

  • When a cache is really a cache or really not

    My Monitor arrived rolled up as usual, but this time with a “Weapons Cache Seized” headline prominently displayed.
    I eagerly unrolled the newspaper, wondering what juicy event had happened in our small town.
    One hunting rifle. One plinking rifle. One handgun.
    After I finished (rolling on the floor laughing) and caught my breath, my son asked what was up.
    I explained to him that this was not a “weapons cache.”

  • Coverage sensationalistic and in poor taste

    Today, I decided to stop subscribing to the Monitor after being a faithful reader for 35 years.
    Why? Because the paper has become a third rate gossip rag with old news, if any news, and the Monitor’s reporting of the “Bathtub Row Standoff” was the last straw.  
    “Weapons cache seized” Cache? Really? Isn’t that a bit sensationalistic? Three guns and 1,000 rounds of ammo is hardly a cache. Any hunter or gun collector is likely to have more than that, and last I checked, it was still legal.

  • Compromise is progress

    In 2010, a year that was bottom-heavy with bad news, we saw major progress in the stormy world of water.
    Three landmark cases that defied resolution and guaranteed lawyers’ job security were settled, and our congressional delegation, led by Sen. Jeff Bingaman, managed to wring funding from Congress.
    We also marked progress on the Rio Grande and in Ruidoso.

  • Downtown businesses would suffer under a one-lane Trinity Drive

    I am writing to voice my concerns over the proposed Trinity Drive options A1 and A2.
    I regularly travel into the downtown area from Los Alamos National Laboratory, and use Trinity on an almost daily basis to run errands and visit my mother living in Aspen Ridge.
    If Trinity is reduced to one lane as proposed, traffic will be at a standstill in the event of an accident, police traffic stop or any type of EMS call.
    Has anyone spoken to the EMS providers or the hospital to see how this will impact their ability to provide emergency services?

  • Let’s put traffic calming ideas to 30-day test run

    I would like to thank the writers in Thursday night’s Monitor, voicing opposition to the “favored” options for the Trinity project.
    It seems obvious that the options A1 and A2 would be a disaster for commuters, shoppers and those wanting to travel from Los Alamos National Laboratory to the town site during noontime.
    Clearly traffic will be slowed to the lowest common denominator and gridlock will likely ensue morning, noon, and early evening. Commuters will, in all likelihood, avoid Trinity like the plague.

  • Just A Wag 01-14-11

    Porn probe set to wrap up
     Word is that the outside investigation into pornography allegedly downloaded from county computers at the Los Alamos Fire Department should conclude today.

    Clerk becoming fulltime?
    We have heard that a move is underway to switch the Los Alamos County Clerk post to a fulltime, salaried position. Stay tuned for updates.

    Send us your wags

  • Tool helps small business tap global markets

    Technology and energy products, chili peppers, nuts, dairy goods and other farm products have topped the list of New Mexico’s exports for the past few years, but the state has a vast untapped potential to sell more of its goods and services well beyond our nation’s boundaries.