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Today's Opinions

  • Seeking a balanced transportation system

    The results of a recent license plate survey taken along Trinity Drive have shown us that Trinity is not just a bypass for commuters driving to work.
    Even during peak commuting hours, less than half the drivers actually continue through to the bridge on Diamond Drive.
    The majority of turn off onto Central Drive or Canyon Road or stop somewhere along Trinity Drive.
    As a matter of fact, there are lots of people living along Trinity, working along Trinity and shopping along Trinity – so Trinity is much more than a commuter road, it is a destination for many.  
    And therefore, the design of Trinity Drive must accommodate many different users and uses.
    Our transportation corridors should offer a balance of mobility options.

  • Spirit is my sixth sense

    September is ovarian cancer awareness month, and, as a survivor, it always reminds me that life is definitely a journey.
    Most of us forget to value what we find most precious, and many just get lost in the day to day humdrum of the 24 hour cycle.
    Sometimes it just takes a good day to re-find our spirit. But other times it takes a miracle.
    It had been a tough couple of years. I often joked that when our container of possessions came over to the states from England in January 2001, a giant mirror must have broken on the ship, because it definitely felt like we were getting a lot of bad luck.

  • Comments are seconded

    We appreciated Jody Sheppard’s positive approach in her “Seven quick comments” Letter to the Editor last week.
     We would like to second her number one and number seven comments.
     “1.  What is behind this dreadful traffic-circle idea?  Leave Trinity Drive alone!”
     “7.  Please reread #1.”
     Thank you for saying it well for many Los Alamos residents and commuters, Ms. Sheppard.
     
    Jim and Nerita Collier
    Los Alamos

     

  • Family full of gratitude

    The family of George O. Bjarke would like to express their appreciation to all of the wonderful people of Los Alamos.  During the recent weeks, while my father was battling Alzheimer’s, so many people reached out to help us.  
    The Los Alamos Medical Center Emergency Department, the nurses and doctors in the hospital, the staff at Sombrillo, the Los Alamos Visiting Home Nurses and hospice care and EMTs were all excellent in their care for him.
    Dr. Church and his staff were very caring for many months and years. Our neighbors provided comfort and food for our family.  
    The outpouring of love from family, friends, the Elks, LAPS and Southwest Airlines has been so appreciated.
    Thank you for all of your care.

  • Helicopters needed

    On Aug. 6, the U.S. lost 30 special forces troops, including 22 Navy SEALS in a helicopter shot down over Afghanistan. These people were the elite of our military who have trained for these missions over many years.
    We have suffered similar losses in prior missions where helicopters loaded with military personnel have been shot down or crashed due to equipment problems.  
    Helicopters are relatively slow moving vehicles, especially the large Chinook helicopters, which operate in close proximity to the ground.  
    They make easy targets for rocket propelled grenades and hand held missile systems. We need missile and RPG counter measure defensive systems to protect our vulnerable helicopters.

  • Keep an eye on decision process

    Robert Gibson’s Sunday column provides an important frame to view our county’s governance as major decisions are and continue to be made.
    Would that it had wider distribution.
    Prospectively the issue remains to be one of accountability, Of course, the county council is subject to the ballot, but that is really all.
    It strikes me the issue also effects county staff, boards and commissions and even charter review.
    In general, most of these do well most of the time, but the (putative) leadership/public service tension  seems to rise up when “leaders” may hear but don’t seem to listen.

  • It's an ugly climate

    Nothing much, bad or good, seems to be happening in the New Mexico economy.
    For the past few months the state has been bumping along.
    The big bad exception is Las Cruces, which has dropped firmly back into recession and job loss. Maybe we’re ending the long slide.
    The job creation index of the Gallup polling firm, released Aug. 19, shows New Mexico tied for 45 out of 51 with three states, California, the epitome of state policies gone wrong; the near bankrupt Rhode Island; and New Hampshire.
    Ugly company. (See www.capiolreportnm.blogspot.com for an explanation of the Gallup survey.)
    Our neighbors fare better, as is usual with state economic performance rankings.

  • Managing epidemics: an argument against blanket job cuts

    The unvaccinated woman got on a plane in London. She flew to Washington, D.C., changed planes and flew to Denver, then on to Albuquerque, and from there drove home to Santa Fe.  She had measles.  
    During the trip, she exposed other passengers from all over the world to this disease.
    Preventing an epidemic involved 70 countries and four states, and cost $1 million, according to Dr. Chad Smelser, an epidemiologist with the New Mexico Department of Health.
    A few other thought-provoking highlights from a recent presentation by Smelser: