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Today's Opinions

  • The art of publicity

    Professional publicists recommend press releases to deliver business news to the media for broadcast to potential customers.
    Publicity of this kind is free and can often be done by a business owner or someone who works for her company.
    If the media publish the story, the business stands to gain the goodwill of existing customers and attract new ones.
    The result can be increased sales at a cost of only the time it takes to write and distribute the release.
    But the average newsroom receives hundreds of e-mails and faxes every day, only a fraction of which are published.
    Competition for print space and airtime means press releases need to be creative, factual and informative.

  • Anthony Casino far from sure thing

    The Jemez casino at Anthony doesn’t look nearly as sure today as it did a month ago when the Bureau of Indian Affairs issued a very rosy draft environmental impact study of the proposal.
    Evidently the draft was prepared by the Jemez Pueblo for the BIA’s consideration. The negative side of the proposal was not mentioned. But now it is coming out.
    The Jemez Pueblo wants to build a casino at Anthony, south of Las Cruces to attract the large population in the El Paso and Juarez area, which don’t have casinos.
    Jemez has the misfortune of not being located on a major highway. So it has petitioned the BIA to allow it to locate a casino on land it would purchase almost 300 miles to the south.

  • Legislature's work covers rules for pasture gates, alcohol, school day

    Other than spending money, much of the work of our Legislature involves creating new rules or tinkering, changing this or that little thing.
    For example, the penalty for leaving a pasture gate open, potentially allowing livestock to escape, used to be $5 to $10. Now the fine ranges from $250 to $1,000, thanks to House Bill 391, one of two animal and livestock bills to pass the 2011 session of Legislature and survive Gov. Susana Martinez’s veto pen.
    The new gate non-closure fine is mentioned in the Highlights report issued last month by the Legislative Council Service. The report emphasizes policy changes.

  • Chewing the fat about gum

    Two young adults sit alone, staring into each other’s eyes.  They move closer.  Closer.  
    A smile slowly forms on their faces and the man reaches into his pocket to take out a packet designed especially for this occasion.  
    But it’s empty!  His smile quickly morphs into panic.  He rushes to the pharmacy, but it’s closed.  He needs that packet.  His girlfriend won’t wait forever.  What is he to do?
    And then he sees a friend in a nearby steamed up car, knocks on the window, and his friend gives him what he needs.  

  • Test to reveal the truth about traffic circles

    I have read several letters to the editor supporting the idea of a two-lane Trinity Drive with roundabouts.
    These letters presented arguments that show how roundabouts have worked in other areas. Yet when I ask people I know for their thoughts on the matter, I have not heard a single person say they’re looking forward to the change.

  • Look who benefits from traffic circle travesty

    Regarding the ill advised plan to construct eight traffic circles in a 4.2 mile stretch of Trinity Drive —  while the bombardment of ads about how great traffic circles are continues to bombard us at the Reel Deal theater, and we watch the waste of money being spent trying to convince a dubious public that this really is a good idea, one can only echo the Roman judge Lucius Cassius: “Cui bono?”  Who benefits?
    Eight traffic circles in four miles?  That’s one traffic circle every half a mile - creating an accelerate-decelerate cycle that disrupts traffic flow, commute speed and fuel economy.  Who benefits?

  • Actions speak volumes

    Things are obviously not peaches and cream between Republican Gov. Susana Martinez and her Republican Lt. Gov. John Sanchez.
    You’ll recall that following their election last November, the then governor-elect trundled into Santa Fe to begin the process of setting up her incoming administration.
    Simultaneously, she cut the lieutenant governor-elect out of that process by dispatching him on a jaunt around the state to find out what business folks thought needed to be done to improve the state’s economy.
    It smelled fishy at the time and it still does.

  • Albuquerque merits pondered

    The Democratic U.S. senate primary is likely to be as hard fought and negative as the GOP primary. The two races have much in common.
    Both contests feature a U.S. house member or former member, representing Albuquerque, against an opponent who has won a statewide election.
    In the GOP primary, former Rep. Heather Wilson and Lt. Gov. John Sanchez do battle.
    In the Democratic primary, Rep. Martin Heinrich and state Auditor Hector Balderas face off.
    Wilson represented Albuquerque for more than 10 years, never losing  an election. She left her seat and unsuccessfully ran statewide in the 2008 GOP senate primary to replace Sen. Pete Domenici.