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Today's Opinions

  • Immigration ills

    When she was two years old, “Maria” crossed the Rio Grande from Mexico on her mother’s back. She grew up as an American, graduated from high school in New Mexico, married a Navajo man and started a family.

    She’s now alone in a rundown apartment in Juarez, one of the planet’s most violent cities, far from her husband and children. Part of the price of trying to obtain legal residency is to first leave the country and wait for the immigration bureaucracy to creak forward. She speaks poor Spanish; to her, Mexico is the foreign country.

  • NM fuel tax increase could ease fiscal pain

    For many years New Mexico citizens have seen gasoline prices bounce up or down by 5, 10 or more cents per gallon.  

    Sometimes there were several price changes each week.  

    Service station operators, fuel distributers and the general public easily handled the constant price changes.  

    Nor have we seen any major negative economic impact or complaints from the general public concerning these constant price bounces.

  • Cuts and consequences

    Those angry growls you hear are likely emanating from employees of state, local and county governments around these United States, and their fury is approaching the level a roar. Two years into the worst economic calamity since the Great Depression, there’s barely a state where declining tax revenues haven’t produced budget shortfalls the likes of which haven’t gripped state and local governments in decades.

  • Shopkeeper says buying local gets her vote

    I just finished reading the Monitor and I have to say that I am truly saddened by what I read.

    Geoff Rodgers is the only candidate who supported local businesses 100 percent in his campaign for county council. Geoff you have my vote!

    The excuses are endless, “It was more convenient to shop in Santa Fe or online,” “It is too expensive when you use a middle man,” and “I did not know that any businesses offered this service.” I can walk down Central Avenue and see that these services are offered at two locations within a block.

  • Chimpanzees deserve better after research

    Chimpanzees walk on two feet. They have hands, use tools and language and have a complex society. They display intelligence and emotion.

    Yet the United States government treats them as property, with no more rights than ashtrays or toilet seats.

    About 240 chimps at the Alamagordo Primate Facility in New Mexico were rescued from an abusive owner - cited for improper care and even negligent deaths - in 2000.

    They had been used for decades for research, much of which could be considered torture.

  • Broken city

    Colorado Springs is broke.

    A friend, driving in Colorado Springs recently, hit a pothole and did $400 in damage to her car. “They’re not fixing the streets!” my friend says angrily.

    It’s just possible my friend was going a tad too fast, perhaps operating on previously true assumptions of flat street surfaces. Certainly, going less fast is one short-term means of dealing with potholes.

    The Colorado Springs situation raises questions about the proper role of government.

  • On the budget, Denish leaves Martinez in the road

    Last week the Legislative Finance Committee warned that the state could see another revenue shortfall, even with the combined cuts and tax increases delivered in the last legislative session, even with federal stimulus money. The governor is presently ignoring the committee’s Nervous Nellies and waiting for consensus estimates by government economists.

    You will recall that if we see red ink, the ball – tossed to him by legislators – is in the governor’s court.

  • Bomb test no surprise in LA

    SANTA FE — Mid-July is a momentous time in New Mexico’s history. On July 14, 1881, Pat Garrett shot Billy the Kid. The Kid is arguably the world’s most famous outlaw. The news quickly traveled around the world.

    On July 16, 1945, the world’s first nuclear explosion occurred at Trinity Site, north of Alamogordo. According to history, news of that event traveled nowhere but Los Alamos, Washington, D.C., London, Potsdam and Moscow.