.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Mountain roads really must be taken seriously

    Sheesh. Two tractor trailers have lost it and crashed in two days on one of our most popular bike rides and recreational roads, N.M. 4, just above the Back Gate.
    From those pictures in the Los Alamos Monitor, it sure is lucky no one on a bike or motor vehicle was in the way.
    It’s also apparently a good idea for a bicyclist to know how to descend that road really fast. Faster than an out-of-control 18-wheeler, at least.
    I better stop trying to lose weight. Gravity loves a big guy. Is it my imagination, or have there not always been a few big rigs driving that route?
    Is it more than coincidence that both trucks were from the same company (according to the Los Alamos Monitor, BB Transport of Colorado) and both loaded with crushed cars?

  • Medicare train wreck's coming

    When a train is heading into a known train wreck, but a switch will allow it to continue on a different tack and avoid the train wreck, should fear or courage allow us to dictate the course of that train?
    I am a consumer of Medicare dollars, spending approximately $35,000 to $70,000 per year for my medical condition. Let’s look at the facts instead of the myths surrounding Medicare reform.
    •Medicare in its current form, will be bankrupt before 2020. Every report confirms that  Medicare spends more money than it takes in. The train wreck is coming. The checks will stop.

  • Burgess was best pick

    Yippee!  Thank you!  
    I have been doing a jig since I read last night’s Monitor (and you know that’s a tall order for me).  
    It’s had to have been a grueling process for you, our council, as well as for the candidates, yet I feel your choice was the very best!  
    Thank you, each of you, for all the effort and care you put in to bringing such a talented person to Los Alamos. After meeting all the candidates and listening to each of them, Harry (Burgess)’ energy, openness and well thought out responses won me over.

  • Leisure pool could benefit everyone

    I have to agree with Robert Visel that the “property taxes in this town are ridiculous” — they average about 60 percent per housing unit of the rate in Livermore and 25 percent or less of other places that a Los Alamos resident is likely to move to (almost anywhere else in California, Massachusetts, New York; see http://www.city-data.com/zips/.

  • Solyndra isn't the whole story

    In the utility room of a wealthy homeowner was a Rube Goldberg-like solar system, impossibly complex. It wasn’t working. In the 1970s, it was my first solar story.
    We’ve come a long way, baby. Now they work, and the biggest obstacle – cost – is going away. Good ol’ American know-how would have risen to the challenge, eventually, but the Chinese beat us to the punch.  

  • Analyze your benefits

    Admit it: You probably spend more time comparison shopping online than reviewing your annual benefits enrollment materials.
    That’s a big mistake because the money you could save by choosing the right employee benefits package probably far exceeds any savings you could get on a big-screen TV.
    For example, many people don’t sign up for an extremely valuable benefit – flexible spending accounts (FSAs).
    If your employer offers them, FSAs let you pay for eligible out-of-pocket health care and/or dependent care expenses on a pre-tax basis – that is, before federal, state and Social Security taxes are deducted from your paycheck.

  • Don’t raise property taxes

    Dear Editor,
    As everyone should know by now they will be receiving a mail-in ballot to vote on a General Obligation Bond to support the construction of a new leisure pool at the Aquatic Center.
      I’m all for this new pool but not at the expense of me having to pay higher property taxes which is how these type of bonds are paid for.  The property taxes in this town are ridiculous as it is and I’m sure not going to pay any more!  And don’t tell me the property taxes won’t go up.  I’ve heard that one before.

  • Diamond delays truly costly

    The Los Alamos Monitor’s blazing headline on Sunday, September 30, “Councilor makes costly motion,” was about three County staffers each spending roughly five hours waiting for an agenda item delayed in a Council meeting.
    Actually, most staffers anticipate that possibility and work on something else in an anteroom.  The time can be at least partially productive.
    A more important story would address how much time we have wasted sitting in traffic on Diamond Drive.  Construction took five years, not the planned three.  In most of those years, work extended weeks to months beyond what was scheduled.  Traffic control plans appeared to have been developed in response to jams, not engineered in advance and then tweaked.