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Today's Opinions

  • Let's get it all straight

    In reference to a story in the Los Alamos Monitor in which the following statement was published, “George Chandler also disputed Gavron’s claim that Trinity had less accidents than other roads.”
    I (Gavron) did not “claim” anything.  I quoted openly published State of New Mexico Highway Department statistics that are freely available on the web.   
    We should rely on hard numbers and not on anecdotal evidence when we decide what is best for our town.
    The numbers clearly show that Trinity Drive is less dangerous than several other roads in our community.

    Victor Gavron
    Los Alamos

     

  • Roundabouts supposed to be wonderland of puppies and butterflies

    Ah, the truth about the traffic circles debate finally emerges.  As a reminder, this all began when the Transportation Board announced that they had a perfect solution to traffic on Trinity Drive — traffic circles.
    Despite the overwhelming skepticism by motorists that traffic circles would work on Trinity, the Transportation Board claimed that traffic would in fact move better with traffic circles than with those pesky traffic lights.
    They knew this to be true because they had hired a landscaping firm that found some software that real traffic engineers use to model these circles.  

  • Keep focus on efficiency

    Two newspaper essays I wrote this spring broached the idea of working on the regulatory process to boost its efficiency. The early responses are in.
    Support is unanimous in all sectors and comes in three colors – white, red and black.  
    White-colored support says the idea is “right on target.” Red support says, “I can tell real horror stories about inefficient regulation.”
    The black support says, “the worst of (business, government) will wreck the good idea from the start.”
    No one thinks the process is as efficient as is.

  • Rep. Jim Hall reports on Special Session

    We are now a few days into the Special Legislative Session.  Before things get really busy, I would like to update citizens of House District 43 on my experience to date and first impression as a new legislator.

  • The battle heats up

    Gov. Susana Martinez has been hauled into court again, although this time it’s Martinez’s Taxation and Revenue Secretary Demesia Padilla who is targeted in a case filed in Santa Fe state district court.
    The suit cites Padilla for implementing the governor’s directive to dispatch some 10,000 letters seeking proof of residency from New Mexico licensed drivers presumed to be illegal immigrants.
    Such licenses may be legally obtained by foreign nationals in New Mexico under a state law passed in 2003.
    Martinez doesn’t like that law and promised to have it repealed during her campaign last year.

  • Chile Pepper Institute reflects the future

    The slash of bright red peeking above a brick wall certainly will catch the eye of some drivers in west Las Cruces. It is red and it is bright.
    A closer look brings something a bit magnificent. The something, a sign claims, is the world’s largest chile. At 45 feet long, it may be. Red indeed, it is.
    It’s that time in New Mexico, the time of picking and processing of the vegetable that is central to our unique cuisine and perhaps to New Mexico’s very soul.

  • Senate race gets revved up

    SANTA FE — The Labor Day weekend usually is the kick off for the following year’s major political campaigns. This year may be a little different however.
    The state legislature’s special session on redistricting undoubtedly will grab many of the headlines for a few weeks. That likely means no major announcements by the candidates but it won’t stop behind-the-scenes jockeying.
    The wide open U.S. Senate race to replace retiring Sen. Jeff Bingaman picked up four major candidates very quickly last spring but has been rather quiet since then.

  • Reapportionment key for LA

    The Los Alamos Monitor story on the future of House District 43 was a great story and it showed the Los Alamos community was alert and concerned about the redistricting of our House seat.
    The presentations were right on with  the strongest being the economic impact of Los Alamos on northern New Mexico. U.S. Senators Clinton Anderson and Pete Domenici knew this well and they were always able to provide support for a strong laboratory as the engine of healthy job and local spending on local economies. The New Mexico House and Senate representatives for Los Alamos took care to work with the state on the important issues of maintaining support for the lab and as an offshoot the workforce.